June 25, 2016

Fontem Publishes in Annals of Operations Research

Belleh Fontem, assistant professor in the College of Business, recently had his article “An Optimal Stopping Policy for Car Rental Businesses with Purchasing Customers” accepted for publication in Annals of Operations Research. The paper is already online at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10479-016-2240-2.

Business Faculty Article Accepted in AIS Educator Journal

Dave Henderson, Mike Lapke and Chris Garcia,  assistant professors in the College of Business, have had their article “SQL Injection: A Demonstration and Implications for Accounting Students” accepted for publication in the AIS Educator Journal.

Rabson Co-edits Anthology of Japanese Literature in Translation

Steve Rabson, Adjunct Instructor at the Leidecker Center for Asian Studies, has published Islands of Protest: Japanese Literature from Okinawa, co-edited with Davinder Bhowmik, from University of Hawaii Press. The anthology presents English translations of fiction, poetry and drama written from the perspectives of an oppressed minority in Japan.

UMW Anthropology Professor Featured on With Good Reason

University of Mary Washington Assistant Professor of Anthropology Laura Mentore will be featured on the With Good Reason public radio program that airs beginning Saturday, August 15.   Laura Mentore, Assistant Professor of Anthropology In the show, “It’s a Jungle Out There,” Mentore discusses her research with the Waiwai, an indigenous people of Guyana, and how she discovered the path of a special songbird from the rainforest to New York City. Mentore has been conducting ethnographic research with the Waiwai and Makushi people of Guyana since 2002, focusing on their perceptions of the environment and emerging relations with urban Guyanese as well as conservation and development NGOs in the region. One thread in her research began upon observing the Waiwai trapping and selling a particular species of seed-finch, which she discovered was being transported to urban areas in coastal Guyana and smuggled into Guyanese diasporic communities in New York. She found that they are key players in a favorite pastime among coastal Guyanese men, a singing competition between birds known as ‘birdsport. “Birdsport is far more than recreational,” said Mentore, whose research sheds light on the complex economic and environmental connections between indigenous communities and urban centers in 21st century Amazonia. “For the men of all backgrounds who participate, it provides an alternative means of social achievement in one of the poorest countries in the Western hemisphere.” With Good Reason is a program of the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities. The show airs weekly in Fredericksburg on Sundays from 1-2 p.m. on Radio IQ 88.3 Digital. To listen from outside of the Fredericksburg area, a complete list of air times and links to corresponding radio stations can be found athttp://withgoodreasonradio.org/when-to-listen.  Audio files of the full program and its companion news feature will be available online at http://withgoodreasonradio.org/?p=25912. Mentore is an expert in environmental transitions and critical development theory, with regional specializations in  Amazonia and the Caribbean. Since joining UMW in 2010, Mentore has launched a summer study abroad course in Guyana called Ethnographic Field Methods. She also teaches anthropology courses relating to economics, food, medicine and gender, in addition to classes on Amazonian societies, environment and development narratives and ethnography. Mentore has been published in The Social Life of Achievement, Anthropology and Humanism and the Journal of Cultural Geography. She is currently waiting publication for her paper titled “The Force of the Imaginary: At Play in the Field of Conservation Economics and Amerindian Sociality.” Mentore is a member of the American Anthropological Association, the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America Society and the Society for Humanistic Anthropology. She is also a board member for the journal Environment and Society. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Virginia and her doctoral degree from Cambridge University.

UMW to Offer Early Decision Admission Plan

The University of Mary Washington will offer early decision as an option to prospective students applying for admission. The university’s Board of Visitors approved the plan during its August 8 meeting.

Donald Rallis' geography class, Thursday Oct. 27, 2011. (Photo by Norm Shafer).Early decision is a binding agreement between a student and the university.  Prospective students who apply to their first-choice institutions by the early decision deadline will receive prompt consideration of their applications. If accepted, the student commits to UMW and agrees to withdraw applications from all other schools.

“We wanted to give students another option as it relates to applying to the University of Mary Washington,” said Kimberley Buster-Williams, associate provost for enrollment management.  “For many students, UMW is their first choice so early decision is a great option. This option empowers high school seniors to tailor their college application experience from day one. ”

UMW will begin accepting early decision applications immediately. Currently, the university also offers non-binding early action and regular decision options for prospective students.

The early decision application deadline is Nov. 1, early action deadline is Nov. 15 and regular admission applications are due Feb. 1. Students will be notified in early December about their acceptance under early decision.

For more information, contact the Office of Admissions at admissions.umw.edu/undergraduate or 540-654-2000.

Main Course

Summer session feeds students’ passion for writing

State Superintendent Steven R. Staples Addresses Master’s Candidates

State Superintendent Steven R. Staples challenged graduates to step up as leaders during his address at the University of Mary Washington’s graduate commencement Friday, May 8.   State Superintendent Steven Staples “We need high quality leadership,” said Staples, who pondered the question of whether leaders are made or born.   He recounted the impact of three diverse trailblazers–Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King Jr. and Mother Teresa—who shared common traits. “All three refused to simply accept circumstances ‘as they were’ and worked to make progress to improve life, despite obstacles and challenges,” Staples said. “And all three led from the heart.  Their leadership was an extension of their core beliefs and principles.” Staples addressed nearly 1,000 graduates, family members, friends and faculty, gathered in Dodd Auditorium. A total of 169 graduate degrees were awarded, including 87 Master of Education degrees, 47 Master of Business Administration degrees, 27 Master of Science in Elementary Education degrees and 8 Master of Science in Management Information Systems degrees. Five graduates received both the MBA and the MSMIS in a dual-degree program. Staples implored graduates to model qualities from such leaders of the past. “Refuse to accept ‘what is’ if ‘what could be’ is better,” he said. “Lead by your core principles.” As Virginia’s 24th superintendent, Staples is a leader in his own right. He serves as the executive officer of the Virginia Department of Education, the administrative agency for the commonwealth’s public schools. He also serves as secretary of the Board of Education. Pondering the ‘born’ or ‘made’ leadership dilemma, Staples said the answer may be a combination of the two. “Perhaps it doesn’t matter, as long as leaders are willing to accept the expectations, responsibilities, and challenges inherent in leadership . . . . as long as we are all ready to become one of those willing to dare greatly.” Pamela Bridgewater, a Foreign Service officer who served as U.S. Ambassador in three countries, will deliver the undergraduate commencement address on Saturday, May 9, beginning at 9 a.m. on Ball Circle.

UMW Initiates Test-Optional Admissions Provision

The University of Mary Washington will offer high-achieving prospective students the opportunity to opt out of providing standardized college admission tests with their application for enrollment. The University’s Board of Visitors approved the action during its April meeting. Donald Rallis' geography class, Thursday Oct. 27, 2011. (Photo by Norm Shafer).Beginning with the 2015-16 recruitment period, high school students who have maintained at least a 3.5 grade point average have the option of waiving submission of their SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test) or ACT (American College Test) scores when applying for admission to the university. Previously, UMW required either SAT or ACT scores for students to be considered for admission. Students applying for merit-based scholarships would be ineligible for this program. “High school GPAs are by far one of the strongest predictors of college success,” said Kimberley Buster-Williams, associate provost for enrollment management and admissions. “We welcome the opportunity to consider admission for students who perhaps do not test well or for whom a standardized test doesn’t reflect their true potential.” Strong academic students traditionally pursue a rigorous high school curriculum that includes college-level courses, Buster-Williams said. She added that the most compelling reason for instituting a test-optional policy is to enhance the diversity of the student body. Data reveals that schools with test-optional policies often see increased applications from minorities, women, Pell-eligible students, first-generation college students and students with learning differences. In addition, a growing body of evidence suggests that high school GPA is a better indicator of student success in college than standardized test scores. Currently, more than 800 colleges and universities no longer require the submission of standardized test scores in admission decisions, according to Fair Test: The National Center for Fair and Open Testing. To be considered for admission to UMW, any student who applies to UMW must submit a high school transcript, essay and letters of recommendation.

Scanning Through History

Students relive the past using 3-D technology.

UMW Students Win Art Awards

The University of Mary Washington Department of Art and Art History announced its student awards at the opening reception of the Annual Student Art Exhibition at the duPont Gallery on Wednesday, April 8.   IMG_9849Senior Taylor White of Stafford received the Melchers Gray Purchase Award for his video “A Lawful Order.” The work will become part of the university’s permanent collection. Senior Marie Firth of Vienna received the Emil Schnellock Award in Painting for her painting “Peggy Childers.” The Department of Art and Art History presents this award each year to recognize excellence in painting. Senior Khirstie Smith of Spotsylvania was presented the Anne Elizabeth Collins Award for her piece, “June Beach.” The following students also received awards at the exhibition’s opening ceremony:
  • Maddox Palmer of Arlington received an award of excellence
  • Christine Valvo of Stafford received an award of excellence
  • Ashley Most of Front Royal received an award of excellence
  • Katie Frazier of Lexington received the Art History Award for Outstanding Research
  • Alyssa Hughes of Chesapeake received The Melchers Award for Excellence in Art History
Tosha Grantham, curator of Second Street Gallery in Charlottesville, selected works for the exhibition from more than 100 submissions and chose the recipients of awards of excellence, along with the Melchers Gray Purchase Award, Emil Schnellock Award in Painting and the Ann Elizabeth Collins Award. The Student Art Exhibition will run through Sunday, April 26 in the duPont Gallery, located on College Avenue at Thornton Street. The exhibition is open to the publ without charge and selected works are for sale. The duPont Gallery is open Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. Free parking is designated for gallery visitors in a lot across College Avenue at Thornton Street. For more information about the UMW Galleries, visit http://www.umwgalleries.org/.