July 24, 2014

UMW Department of Theatre & Dance Brings Back “Always…Patsy Cline”

In response to overwhelming and unprecedented demand, the University of Mary Washington Department of Theatre & Dance is bringing “Always…Patsy Cline” by Ted Swindley back to Klein Theatre. Performances will be July 9-12, July 16-19, and July 23-26 at 7:30 p.m., and July 12, 13, 19, 20, 26, and 27 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $40 for standard admission, $35 for students, senior citizens, UMW alumni, and the military and $25 for groups of 10 or more. Tickets are on sale at umw.tix.com.

Photo by Geoff Greene.

Photo by Geoff Greene.

“Never in the history of our program have we experienced such a demand for tickets,” said Director Gregg Stull, chair of the Department of Theatre & Dance and the Department of Music. “We are thrilled to be able to offer this thrilling production to the greater Fredericksburg community this summer.”

UMW’s original production ran in Klein Theatre for three sold-out weeks in February.

“Always…Patsy Cline” is based on the true story of Louise Seger, a fan of Patsy Cline, who gets the chance to meet Cline when she comes to her hometown for a show. Louise and Patsy become fast friends, bonding after the show over the troubles of life. Their friendship grew through a series of letters and phone calls that continued until Cline’s untimely death. The musical features many of Patsy Cline’s hits, including “Crazy,” “Walkin’ After Midnight,” and “I Fall to Pieces.”

Taryn  Snyder as Patsy Cline. Photo by Geoff Greene.

Taryn Snyder as Patsy Cline.
Photo by Geoff Greene.

Virginia Patterson Hensley, known as Patsy Cline, was a country singer from Winchester, Va., who crossed over in the 1960’s from country and western into the pop-music charts. She died at the age of 30 in a plane crash in 1963. Ten years later, Cline became the first female solo artist to be inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame. Her plaque in the Hall of Fame reads: “Her heritage of timeless recordings is testimony to her artistic capacity.”

“Always…Patsy Cline” features two local students in the roles of Patsy Cline and her friend and fan, Louise Seger. Senior theatre major Taryn Snyder, who grew up in Fredericksburg before moving to Rochester, N.Y., to attend high school, plays the role of Patsy. Fellow senior theatre major Emily Burke, who graduated from James Monroe High School, plays Louise. Burke is the recipient of the Susan Mulholland Breedin ’86 Scholarship and Snyder received the Debby C. Klein Scholarship for 2013-14. Both students are members of Alpha Psi Omega, the national collegiate theatre honorary fraternity.

“Always…Patsy Cline” is directed by Stull, with musical direction by Christopher Wingert. Scenic design is by associate professor Julie Hodge and costume design is by associate professor Kevin McCluskey. Lighting and sound designs are by guest artists Catherine Girardi and Anthony Angelini. For more information or to purchase tickets, call the Klein Theatre Box Office at (540) 654-1111 or visit umw.tix.com.

UMW’s M.S. in Geospatial Analysis Program Begins This Fall

Students interested in the University of Mary Washington’s new Master of Science in geospatial analysis program will have an opportunity to meet with faculty and tour the facilities at an open house on Wednesday, May 14. The open house will begin at 6:30 p.m. in Monroe Hall, Room 346.

Professor Brian Rizzo (right) works with students in UMW's GIS lab.

Professor Brian Rizzo (right) works with students in UMW’s GIS lab.

Geospatial analysis encompasses geographic information systems (GIS), remote sensing, and global positioning systems (GPS) to organize, analyze and display spatial information. UMW will be one of only two institutions in Virginia to offer an advanced degree focused solely on geospatial analysis.

The M.S. in geospatial analysis will be an intensive 12-month program designed for both recent graduates and working professionals. The graduate degree was approved by the Board of Visitors and the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia in 2013. A complete course outline is available at http://cas.umw.edu/gis/masters/.

UMW’s program will require 30-course credits, which will be available through evening classes and can be taken by both full-time and part-time students. Applications for the program have a recommended filing date of June 1. For more information, contact Brian Rizzo, director of GIS programs, at rizzo@umw.edu or Steve Hanna, chair of the Department of Geography, at shanna@umw.edu.

Students Presented Work at Research and Creativity Symposium

Hundreds of University of Mary Washington students presented their research as part of the annual Undergraduate Student Research and Creativity Symposium on Friday, April 25. The event, in its eighth year at UMW, celebrates excellence in undergraduate student research by giving students the opportunity to share their work with faculty, their peers and the public.

Students discuss their research in Jepson Hall as part of the ninth Research and Creativity Symposium.

Students discuss their research in Jepson Hall as part of the ninth Research and Creativity Symposium.

The presentations represented various disciplines, including the sciences, history, humanities, mathematics, social sciences and the arts.

Many student oral and poster presentations took place in Jepson Hall, filling the building with students, faculty and family members. Presentation topics ranged from biodegradable polymers and erosion in the Chesapeake Bay to food security and advertising.

“It’s fun learning about the real life applications of the chemistry we’ve been learning,” said Rachel Thomas, a sophomore biology major and chemistry minor who presented on alternative methods for closing wounds. “You learn more as you go, and people ask questions to really help you think about your research.”

An art student shares her work.

An art student shares her work.

Student performed original music and scenes from plays in duPont Hall, with art and art history presentations and works in Melchers.

In conjunction with the symposium, additional presentations took place across campus in the areas of English, math, history and geography.

“We hope that our research will help inspire future UMW students,” said David Chambers, a senior geography major who co-presented with junior Ray Humiston on the results of their field work on deforestation in Guatemala.

The symposium kicked-off on Thursday, April 24 with the keynote lecture “Structural Color – Origin and Evolution,” by Hui Cao, professor of applied physics and physics at Yale University.

The Undergraduate Student Research and Creativity Symposium is funded by the Class of 1959 Endowment. For a full list of student presentations, visit http://cas.umw.edu/student-research-and-creativity-symposium/.

National Geographic Photographer Visits UMW, May 8

Noted National Geographic photographer Annie Griffiths will present “A Camera, Two Kids and a Camel” at the University of Mary Washington on Thursday, May 8. The lecture, which is free and open to the public, will begin at 7 p.m. in the Jepson Alumni Executive Center and will be followed by a book signing and Q&A session.

National Geographic photographer Annie Griffiths  will present a lecture on Thursday, May 8. ©National Geographic Live. Photo by Mark Thiessen.

National Geographic photographer Annie Griffiths will present a lecture on Thursday, May 8.
©National Geographic Live. Photo by Mark Thiessen.

During her visit to campus, Griffiths also will meet with UMW photography and journalism students.

In 2008 Griffiths published “A Camera, Two Kids and a Camel,” a photo memoir about balance and the joy of creating a meaningful life. In 2010, she published “Simply Beautiful Photographs,” which was named the top photo/art book of the year by Amazon and by Barnes and Noble.

She has photographed in nearly 150 countries in her career at National Geographic and her work has appeared in dozens of magazine and book projects. Griffiths has received awards from the National Press Photographers Association, the Associated Press, the National Organization of Women, The University of Minnesota and the White House News Photographers Association.

In addition to her photography work, Griffiths is the executive director of Ripple Effect Images, a collective of photographers who document the programs that are empowering women and girls throughout the developing world.

For more information about the lecture, contact Carole Garmon, chair of the Department of Art and Art History, at cgarmon@umw.edu.

UMW Sophomore Receives Barry Goldwater Honorable Mention

University of Mary Washington sophomore Juliana Laszakovits is the recipient of an honorable mention from the Barry Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Foundation.

Juliana Laszakovits

Juliana Laszakovits
Photo by Leigh Williams ’14

Her work focuses on understanding how dead plant life, known as dissolved organic matter, and pharmaceuticals and personal care products, known as PPCP’s, degrade. An accurate estimation of how quickly PPCP naturally degrade will provide a better estimate of the actual concentrations of pharmaceuticals entering the environment. During her research process, Laszakovits, a chemistry major, collaborated with research groups from Ohio State University and the University of Connecticut. Charles Sharpless, UMW associate professor of chemistry, will present their research findings at the Gordon Research Conference this summer.

The Barry Goldwater Scholarship Program, established by Congress in 1986 to honor longtime Senator Barry Goldwater, is designed to foster and encourage outstanding students to pursue careers in the fields of mathematics, the natural sciences and engineering. The Goldwater Scholarship is the premier undergraduate award of its type in these fields. It aims to foster and encourage excellence in the STEM disciples and to education and train new generations of U.S. leaders.

This year, the Goldwater Foundation awarded 283 scholarships from more than 1,100 STEM students across the country. In addition to the scholarships, the foundation also recognized several students from each state with the honorable mention distinction.

Laszakovits, a member of the UMW Honor’s Program, has been named to the Dean’s List. In August, she will attend the Biennial Conference on Chemical Education to present findings on the effectiveness of Peer Assisted Study Sessions at UMW.

UMW Students Win Art Awards

The University of Mary Washington Department of Art and Art History announced its student awards at the opening reception of the Annual Student Juried Art Exhibition at the duPont Gallery on Wednesday, April 9.

Senior Sidney Mullis received the Melchers Gray Purchase Award for her piece “Straight.”

Senior Sidney Mullis received the Melchers Gray Purchase Award for her piece “Straight.”

Senior Sidney Mullis of Spotsylvania received the Melchers Gray Purchase Award for her piece “Straight.” The work will become part of the university’s permanent collection.

Senior Christine Valvo of Stafford received the Emil Schnellock Award in Painting for her piece “VI.” The Department of Art and Art History presents this award each year to recognize excellence in painting.

Senior Elizabeth Castillo of Alexandria was presented the Anne Elizabeth Collins Award for her piece, “Andy Warhol.”

Senior Christine Valvo received the Emil Schnellock Award in Painting for her piece “VI.”

Senior Christine Valvo received the Emil Schnellock Award in Painting for her piece “VI.”

The following students also received awards at the exhibition’s opening ceremony:

  • Tim Stark of Fredericksburg received an award of excellence,
  • Michelle Howell of Spotsylvania received an award of excellence,
  • Ellen Dreher of Roanoke  received an award of excellence,
  • Kristine Woeckener of Fredericksburg received the Art History Award for Outstanding Research,
  • Isabel Smith of Silver Spring, Md., received the Melchers Award for Excellence in Art History.

Artist Desiree Holman selected works for the exhibition from more than 100 submissions, and chose the recipients of the awards of excellence, the Melchers Gray Purchase Award, the Emil Schnellock Award in Painting and the Anne Elizabeth Collins Award.

Senior Elizabeth Castillo was presented the Anne Elizabeth Collins Award for her piece, “Andy Warhol.”

Senior Elizabeth Castillo was presented the Anne Elizabeth Collins Award for her piece, “Andy Warhol.”

The Student Juried Art Exhibition will run through Sunday, April 21 in the duPont Gallery, located on College Avenue at Thornton Street. The exhibition is open to the public without charge and selected works are for sale.

The duPont Gallery is open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. Free parking is designated for gallery visitors in a lot across College Avenue at Thornton Street.

UMW Theatre Closes 2013-14 Season with Production of “Lysistrata”

The University of Mary Washington Department of Theatre & Dance will debut “Lysistrata” as its final show of the 2013-2014 season. Performances will be April 10-12 and April 16-19 at 8 p.m., and April 13 and 19 at 2 p.m. in duPont Hall’s Klein Theatre.

UMW's production of "Lysistrata" opens Thursday, April 10. Photo by Geoff Greene.

UMW’s production of “Lysistrata” opens Thursday, April 10. Photo by Geoff Greene.

“Lysistrata,” written by Aristophanes and translated by Dudley Fitts, is a comedy set in ancient Greece, where there seems to be no end to the Peloponnesian War. The main character, Lysistrata, convinces the women of Sparta and Athens to withhold sexual privileges from their husbands until they negotiate peace. Comedy and ancient ideals come to a head as Aristophanes explores the effects of war and the lengths many will go to end it.

The anti-war play, first staged in 411 B.C. during the Festival of Dionysus, has been produced all over the world. This production is a sophisticated and timeless play that explores ageless ideas with suggestive language and sexual imagery.

“Lysistrata” is directed by Helen Housley, associate professor of theatre. Scenic and lighting designs are by student designers Sidney Mullis and Christopher Stull, respectively. Costume design is by Associate Professor Kevin McCluskey, and sound design is by guest artist, Anthony Angelini.

Tickets are $18 for standard admission and $16 for students, senior citizens, alumni and military. For more information or to purchase tickets, call the Klein Theatre Box Office at (540) 654-1111 or visit http://umw.tix.com/.

New Director Brings Expertise to UMW’s Nursing Completion Program

Pamela McCullough has a nearly 35-year nursing career, a focus on patient-centered care, and a passion for the liberal arts.

Now, she is taking the helm of the University of Mary Washington’s new bachelor of science in nursing completion program, which is slated to begin this fall. The program is designed for registered nurses who have graduated with an accredited associate’s degree or diploma nursing program.

Pamela McCullough

Pamela McCullough

“Continuing your education to the bachelor level makes you able to see a more global picture of healthcare,” she said. “You are looking at populations instead of individuals. You are learning how to think using different models. It’s exposure to different ways of thinking.”

McCullough pointed to recent studies that show patient outcomes are improved when at least 80 percent of nurses hold bachelor’s degrees.

“Not only does the employer want it, but there is an advantage for the individual,” she said. “[The curriculum] focuses on how to think outside the box.”

As an undergraduate, she started out as a theater major, then started her nursing coursework. Those connections between the liberal arts and healthcare drew her to UMW’s program.

McCullough, herself a registered nurse and certified nurse practitioner, wants the degree program to be a good fit for working nurses.

“I want to make it flexible and individualized,” she said. “Some nurses will want to go fast and some will go slow. I want to adapt our program to meet their needs.”

The coursework will include classes that allow nurses to make connections between their everyday situations and liberal arts disciplines, including advanced writing techniques, sociology courses on global health and medicine, and medical ethics.

McCullough has lived in the Fredericksburg area since 1998. Most recently, she spent more than two years as nursing program director at Stratford University in Woodbridge. She also spent a decade as a certified nurse practitioner at Pratt Pediatrics in Fredericksburg.

She received a bachelor’s degree, master’s degree and post-master’s certificate from the Catholic University of America and a doctor of nursing practice from Old Dominion University. She completed her doctoral capstone project at UMW’s Student Health Center from 2009 to 2011.

For more information about the program, please contact McCullough at pmccullo@umw.edu.

“Spring Awakening” Opens Tonight at Klein Theatre

The University of Mary Washington’s Department of Theatre & Dance will continue its 2013-2014 season with a production of the rock musical “Spring Awakening.” Performances will be Nov. 7-9, Nov. 13-16 and Nov. 21-23 at 8 p.m. and Nov. 10, 16, 17, 23 and 24 at 2 p.m. in duPont Hall’s Klein Theatre. Tickets are $24 for general admission and $20 for students, senior citizens and military.

Courtesy of Geoff Greene.

Courtesy of Geoff Greene.

“Spring Awakening,” with book and lyrics by Steven Sater and music by Duncan Sheik, revolves around the lives of school children in 19th-century Germany who are struggling to comprehend the changes in their bodies and the consequences of searching for the answers on their own.

“The truth of ‘Spring Awakening’ is as relevant today as it was over a century ago,” said Gregg Stull, professor and chair of the Department of Theatre & Dance and Department of Music. “I know our production will touch our audience and leave them pondering the musical’s questions about what it means to grow up in our complex and uncertain world.”

The play, by Frank Wedekind, first opened on Broadway at the Eugene O’Neill Theatre on December 10, 2006.  The original Broadway cast starred Lea Michele, Jonathan Groff and John Gallagher, Jr. in the lead roles. The musical won eight Tony Awards, including for best musical, direction, book, score, and featured actor in a musical. The collaboration between Steven Sater and American singer-songwriter, Duncan Sheik, also brought the show a Grammy for its cast album.

Courtesy of Geoff Greene.

Courtesy of Geoff Greene.

Stull is the director of the show, with musical direction by Christopher Wingert and choreography by Samantha Reynolds. Scenic design is by Associate Professor Julie Hodge and costume design is by Associate Professor Kevin McCluskey. Lighting and sound design are by guest artists Jason Arnold and Christopher Husted.

The show explores provocative ideas with explicit language, sexual situations and nudity. For more information or to purchase tickets, call the Klein Theatre Box Office at (540) 654-1111 or visit http://cas.umw.edu/theatre/.

News release prepared by: Jamie Wilson

Art Historian, Alumna Visited UMW

The University of Mary Washington’s Department of Art and Art History and the Wendy Shadwell ’63 Program Endowment in Art History sponsored a two-day visit from Allison Stagg ’02, a 2012 Jane and Morgan Whitney Postdoctoral Fellow of Drawings and Prints at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, on Nov.7 and 8.

Stagg presented a public lecture, “James Akin: The First American Caricaturist,” on Thursday, Nov. 7 at 5 p.m. in Lee Hall, Room 411. Stagg’s upcoming book and the basis for her lecture, “The Art of Wit: American Political Caricature,” is the result of her extensive research on U.S. political caricature between 1780 and 1830.

Allison Stagg '02 will visit UMW on Nov. 7-8.

Allison Stagg ’02 will visit UMW on Nov. 7-8.

James Akin was an American artist who, in 1804, published a visual satirical attack against President Thomas Jefferson through a caricature. Akin was the most infamous caricaturist of his time period. Politicians, contemporary artists and newspaper editors cautioned him that his prints would have a negative impact on his career, but his work influenced many popular caricaturists of the 19th century.

On Friday, Nov. 8, Stagg held an informal group talk about her career at 9:30 a.m. in Melchers Hall, Room 107. She also had individual appointments with interested students.

Stagg has roots in museum experience through curating exhibitions at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Morris-Jumel Mansion in New York and University College in London. She also organized exhibitions at the British Museum and National Portrait Gallery in London and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

A 2002 graduate of Mary Washington, Stagg has received many fellowships and grants from institutions such as the American Philosophical Society, the New York Public Library, the Smithsonian American Art Museum and Yale University.