May 25, 2016

Elizabeth Johnson-Young Wins National Communication Association Award

Elizabeth Johnson-Young, assistant professor of communication, was recently awarded the prize for the Top Student Paper in the Health Communication Division of the National Communication Association. The paper, “Predicting Intentions to Breastfeed for Three Months, Six Months, and One Year Using the Theory of Planned Behavior and Body Satisfaction,” was written and submitted while completing her doctoral studies in the spring of 2015 and was presented at the organization’s national conference in Las Vegas in November.

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Johnson-Young’s research surveyed pregnant women regarding their intentions to breastfeed their babies for three recommended periods of time. Findings demonstrated the strength of the theory of planned behavior constructs in predicting these intentions, as well as a possible boomerang effect of perceived subjective norms, which might also be conceptualized as perceived social pressure. Including body satisfaction prior to and during pregnancy also appeared to be a significant moderator of these intentions, providing a new way to understand both theoretical influences and practical considerations for this specific population in making health decisions.

Rochelle Featured in Radio Segment

Warren Rochelle, professor of English, was the featured writer on The Rainbow Minutes, a feature of WRIR, 97.3. His topic was Gay Science Fiction and Fantasy. Check out http://wrir.org/ for more information.

Lorentzen Gives Talk at Victorians Institute

Eric Lorentzen, associate professor of English, presented a talk at this year’s Victorians Institute conference, held in Charlotte, Oct. 23-25.  The theme of the 43rd annual conference was “The Mysteries at Our Own Doors,” and his talk was entitled “‘The Narrative of the Tombstone': Teaching English 251S — British Victorian Detective and Sensation Novel.”  In this talk, he was able to share, with Victorian colleagues from across the country, the pedagogical philosophies and praxes that he has employed in his course for the Department of English, Linguistics, and Communication, as well as an argument about the goals and objectives of this course and genre.  He also connected the talk to a summer course here at the University of Mary Washington in which he and his students pursue the study of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and his famous detective, Sherlock Holmes.

Cross-Country Chronicles

Adam Hunter pedaled from California to Virginia, blogging about his experiences along the way.

Cross-Country Chronicles

Adam Hunter pedaled from California to Virginia, blogging about his experiences along the way.

English Alum Nominated for Emmy

UMW Alumnus Alexander Cardia ’07 is among the nominees for the 35th Annual News & Documentary Emmy Awards announced by the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. Cardia is nominated in the category of Outstanding Graphic Design & Art Direction, he was nominated for his animation and design work on Superheroes: A Never-Ending Battle, produced by PBS. For a full list of nominees, visit: emmyonline.com/news_35th_nominations.

 

 

 

Scanlon’s With Good Reason Interview to be Rebroadcast, June 21

English Professor Mara N. Scanlon’s interview about Walt Whitman and the famed poet’s experiences as a Civil War nurse will be rebroadcast on the public radio program “With Good Reason” beginning Saturday, June 21.

In 1862, poet Walt Whitman went to Fredericksburg to search in field hospitals for his brother who had been wounded in a Civil War battle. Shocked by the bloodshed, Whitman worked as a nurse for years through the end of the war.

The interview, “Whitman at War,” originally aired in 2009. The segment can be heard online at http://withgoodreasonradio.org/2014/06/america-the-beautiful/.

Finally, the Right Fit

Simpson Library boasted new CD-ROMS. The Battlefield Athletic Complex had just been completed. And acid wash jeans and shoulder pads ruled Campus Walk.

Finally, the Right Fit

Mollie Welty's UMW journey, which started in 1989, came full circle at Commencement.

Creative Critics

A small circle of University of Mary Washington students scrutinized the printed sheets of poetry resting on their laps. Lost in their lively deliberation the amateur literary critics seemed oblivious to the bitter cold outside the Combs Hall window.