September 22, 2014

Learning Lab Redefined

UMW students train service dogs.

Mindy Erchull Honored with Leadership Award

Mindy Erchull, associate professor of psychology at the University of Mary Washington, has been recognized as an emerging leader by the American Psychological Association (APA).

Mindy Erchull

Mindy Erchull

The award, given by the APA’s Committee on Women in Psychology, honors psychologists who have made a substantial contribution to women in psychology and show promise of an extensive, influential career. Erchull was distinguished for her pattern of scholarship, mentorship of undergraduate students and service to the profession.

She was named an APA Fellow in 2013, and currently serves as program chair for the 2015 APA convention for the Society for the Psychology of Women. She has presented her research on gender issues and feminism at numerous APA conventions.

Erchull earned a Ph.D. and an M.A. in social psychology from Arizona State University, after receiving a B.A. in psychology from Connecticut College. Her research interests include objectification and sexualization of women, feminism and feminist identity, psychological aspects of reproductive health, and attitudes about menstruation. She also has broad training in social psychology, health psychology, psychology of women, women’s health, social influence, and statistics and research methods.

In addition to research and academic training in these areas, Erchull serves as a consulting editor for Psychology of Women Quarterly, Women’s Reproductive Health, and Gender Issues. She also regularly reviews manuscripts for other journals, including Sex Roles, Health Care for Women International and Basic and Applied Social Psychology.

 

Psychopharmacologist Named UMW Psychology Graduate-In-Residence

Annie Kleykamp, a scientist with Pinney Associates Inc., has been named Graduate-in-Residence for the University of Mary Washington’s Department of Psychology. An expert on the effects of nicotine, alcohol and opiates on cognitive function in healthy and drug dependent adults, she also is an accomplished scientific writer who has taught at the University of Maryland and the United States Naval Academy.

Annie Kleykamp '01

Annie Kleykamp ’01

Kleykamp will visit the Fredericksburg campus for three days, including Thursday, September 18, when she will present a public lecture,And Now for Something Completely Different: Using a Psychology Degree in the 21st Century.” The talk will take place in Combs Hall, Room 139 at 7:30 p.m.

Kleykamp will talk to psychology classes about both her research on the effects of addictive drugs and her work as a technical writer in the field of health technology and pharmacology. She also will meet with students who are interested in pursuing careers in experimental psychology.

After graduating UMW in 2001, Kleykamp received a master’s degree from Wake Forest University and a Ph.D. in experimental psychology from Virginia Commonwealth University. She completed post-doctoral fellowships at Johns Hopkins University, the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

The Graduate-in-Residence program began in 1995 as a part of career advising within the psychology department, helping expose psychology majors to UMW graduates working in their field. Each year, the psychology department faculty nominate alumni who participate in interesting work in the psychology field.

The Graduate-in-Residence program is partially funded by the Campus Academic Resources Committee. For more information about the Graduate-in-Residence program, contact the Department of Psychology at (540) 654-1054.

Psychopharmacologist Named UMW Psychology Graduate-In-Residence

Annie Kleykamp, a scientist with Pinney Associates Inc., has been named Graduate-in-Residence for the University of Mary Washington’s Department of Psychology. An expert on the effects of nicotine, alcohol and opiates on cognitive function in healthy and drug dependent adults, she also is an accomplished scientific writer who has taught at the University of Maryland and the United States Naval Academy.

Annie Kleykamp '01

Annie Kleykamp ’01

Kleykamp will visit the Fredericksburg campus for three days, including Thursday, September 18, when she will present a public lecture,And Now for Something Completely Different: Using a Psychology Degree in the 21st Century.” The talk will take place in Combs Hall, Room 139 at 7:30 p.m.

Kleykamp will talk to psychology classes about both her research on the effects of addictive drugs and her work as a technical writer in the field of health technology and pharmacology. She also will meet with students who are interested in pursuing careers in experimental psychology.

After graduating UMW in 2001, Kleykamp received a master’s degree from Wake Forest University and a Ph.D. in experimental psychology from Virginia Commonwealth University. She completed post-doctoral fellowships at Johns Hopkins University, the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

The Graduate-in-Residence program began in 1995 as a part of career advising within the psychology department, helping expose psychology majors to UMW graduates working in their field. Each year, the psychology department faculty nominate alumni who participate in interesting work in the psychology field.

The Graduate-in-Residence program is partially funded by the Campus Academic Resources Committee. For more information about the Graduate-in-Residence program, contact the Department of Psychology at (540) 654-1054.

UMW Student Wins Virginia Psychological Association Award

University of Mary Washington senior Leanna Papp has been named the winner of the Frederick B. Rowe Award for an outstanding paper at the Virginia Psychological Association conference.

Leanna Papp '14 (right) worked with Professor Mindy Erchull (left) on her award-winning paper.

Leanna Papp ’14 (right) worked with Professor Mindy Erchull (left) on her award-winning paper.

Papp received the award for her paper “Looking Over Her Shoulder: Women’s Justifying Beliefs and Experiences of Objectification Predict Fear of Rape and Rape Avoidance Tactics.” The work serves as her psychology honors thesis and her women’s and gender studies capstone project with Associate Professor of Psychology Mindy Erchull.

The paper explores the effects of the history of rape and attempted rape, sexual objectification, and justifying beliefs on the fear of rape and rape-avoidant behaviors of women. The results suggest that women’s fear of rape is often more contingent on more subtle factors than obvious trauma, and that rape avoidance behavior may be a more complicated construct than originally hypothesized. In 2013, Papp received an undergraduate research grant from Psi Chi, the International Honor Society in Psychology, to begin her project.

“The fact that Leanna sought off-campus grant funding for this project is indicative of her drive and determination to see this project through,” Erchull said. “I look forward to working with her in the coming months to revise her thesis for publication.”

A psychology and women’s and gender studies double major, Papp is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, Psi Chi and Mortar Board. She has worked as a writing tutor for the past three years and as a research assistant/lab aide for the Department of History and American Studies since her junior year. She is a founding member of the campus feminist club, and has served as its president.

Psychology Professor to Appear on Radio Program

Mindy Erchull, associate professor of psychology at the University of Mary Washington, will appear on the public radio show “With Good Reason” to discuss her research on the connections between female jealousy and abusive relationships. The show, “A Jealous Kind of Love,” will air beginning Saturday, April 26.

Mindy Erchull, assistant professor of psychology at the University of Mary Washington, has received the 2011 Psi Chi Southeastern Regional Faculty Advisor Award for her active involvement as the university’s Psi Chi chapter advisor.

Mindy Erchull

During the show, Erchull will suggest that women who see jealousy as a positive thing may be more likely to find themselves in abusive relationships, based on findings from a recent survey. The program also will feature commentary from instructors at several Virginia institutions, including George Mason University and the University of Virginia.

Erchull was recently named the 2014 recipient of the Florence L. Denmark Faculty Adviser Award by Psi Chi, the international honor society in psychology.

Audio files of the full program will be posted online at http://withgoodreasonradio.org/2014/04/jealousy/.

With Good Reason” is a program of the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities. The show airs weekly in Fredericksburg on Sundays from 1-2 p.m. on Radio IQ 88.3 Digital. To listen from outside of the Fredericksburg area, a complete list of air times and links to corresponding radio stations can be found at http://withgoodreasonradio.org/when-to-listen/.

UMW to Host Psi Chi Symposium, April 17-18

James P. Morris, assistant professor of psychology at the University of Virginia, will deliver the keynote address at the 29th annual Psi Chi Symposium for Undergraduate Research in Psychology at the University of Mary Washington. The lecture, “Characterizing Individual Variability in Neural Circuitry Underlying Social Perception,” will be delivered at 4 p.m. on Friday, April 18 in Lee Hall, Room 411.

James P. Morris, assistant professor of psychology at the University of Virginia

James P. Morris, assistant professor of psychology at the University of Virginia

UMW students will present their research as part of the symposium on Thursday, April 17from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and on Friday, April 18from 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Lee Hall, Room 411. Morris’s lecture and the symposium are free and open to the public.

Morris is the head of the Social Neuroscience Laboratory at the University of Virginia.  He also teaches courses in human neuroscience, social neuroscience and social neuroscience research at UVA.  In his research, Morris focuses on how social perception is represented in the brain, with research relating specifically to the neuroscience of autism spectrum disorder, epigenetics and social perception. He is a member of the International Society for Autism Research, the Society for Experimental Social Psychology and the Social and Affective Neuroscience Society.

Sponsored by UMW’s chapter of Psi Chi, the international honor society in psychology, the symposium provides a forum for students to share their research and findings with their professors and peers.

For more information, contact Mindy Erchull, associate professor of psychology, at (540) 654-1557.

Liss and Erchull Publish in Psychology of Women

Miriam Liss, professor of psychology, and Mindy Erchull, associate professor of psychology, published a paper in the September 2013 issue of Psychology of Women Quarterly titled “Differences in Beliefs and Behaivors Between Feminist Actual and Anticipated Mothers.” They found that feminist non-mothers anticipated an egalitarian division of labor but feminist mothers were more likely to do the majority of the household chores and childcare. They also found that young feminist women anticipating motherhood hoping to give their children nontraditional name choices while feminist mothers were more likely to give their children their husbands’ last name.

UMW Hosted Psi Chi Research Symposium

Bruce Rybarczyk, associate professor and director of clinical psychology at Virginia Commonwealth University, delivered the keynote address at the 28th annual Psi Chi Symposium for Undergraduate Research in Psychology at the University of Mary Washington. The lecture, “The Sleep System: Your Owner’s Manual for Maintenance and Repair,” was held on Friday, April 19 from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. in Chandler Hall, Room 102.

Bruce Rybarczyk, associate professor of psychology at Virginia Commonwealth University
Photo courtesy of VCU

As part of the symposium, psychology students presented their research during sessions on Thursday, April 18 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Friday, April 19 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Chandler Hall, Room 102. A reception followed the conclusion of the symposium on Friday.

Ryabarczyk is a faculty member and director of the clinical psychology program at VCU.  His research focuses on understanding and facilitating the psychological adaption to chronic medical illness and disability. Ryabarczyk’s studies, which have been published in numerous scholarly journals and book chapters, include coping mechanisms and intervention techniques for recovering patients and behavioral sleep medicine.

Sponsored by UMW’s chapter of Psi Chi, the international honor society in psychology, the symposium provides a forum for students to share their research and findings with professors and peers.

For more information, contact Mindy Erchull, associate professor of psychology, at (540) 654-1557.

David Rettinger Named Executive Director of Center for Honor, Leadership and Service

The University of Mary Washington has named David A. Rettinger as executive director of the newly formed Center for Honor, Leadership and Service. Rettinger, a member of UMW’s psychology faculty since 2006, will remain in his role as associate professor.

As executive director, Rettinger will promote collaboration between faculty and student services, develop new programs and coursework and facilitate communication on campus about honor, service and leadership. He also will conduct research on academic integrity and serve as the content expert on honor.

The center aims to enhance and deepen student learning through best practices, educational competency and skill sets for leadership and service grounded in the core value of honor. Starting with the fall semester, the center will involve students in the areas of honor, leadership and service through leadership training and development, an annual leadership conference, honor training, service learning opportunities and immersion experiences, as well as special programs and events throughout the year.

“Honor, leadership and service are at the heart of UMW’s ethos and the center was created with the goal of placing these three virtues at the heart of the Mary Washington experience,” Rettinger said. “Our goal is to provide students with opportunities both within and beyond the curriculum to develop as leaders in pursuit of an honorable life in service to communities great and small.”

Rettinger has been the faculty advisor to the UMW Honor Council since 2008. An expert on moral decision making and academic integrity, his research on student cheating and academic honor issues has been widely published in academic journals, including most recently in Ethics & Behavior and Research in Higher Education.

In February, Rettinger presented “Impulsivity and Emotion: Leveraging Individual Differences to Reduce Cheating” at an international higher education conference in Germany. Also at the conference, Rettinger gave a presentation on UMW’s honor system and honor code.

Rettinger received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan and a master’s degree and doctorate from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

For more information about the Center, visit http://students.umw.edu/chls/.