April 19, 2014

UMW to Host Psi Chi Symposium, April 17-18

James P. Morris, assistant professor of psychology at the University of Virginia, will deliver the keynote address at the 29th annual Psi Chi Symposium for Undergraduate Research in Psychology at the University of Mary Washington. The lecture, “Characterizing Individual Variability in Neural Circuitry Underlying Social Perception,” will be delivered at 4 p.m. on Friday, April 18 in Lee Hall, Room 411.

James P. Morris, assistant professor of psychology at the University of Virginia

James P. Morris, assistant professor of psychology at the University of Virginia

UMW students will present their research as part of the symposium on Thursday, April 17from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and on Friday, April 18from 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Lee Hall, Room 411. Morris’s lecture and the symposium are free and open to the public.

Morris is the head of the Social Neuroscience Laboratory at the University of Virginia.  He also teaches courses in human neuroscience, social neuroscience and social neuroscience research at UVA.  In his research, Morris focuses on how social perception is represented in the brain, with research relating specifically to the neuroscience of autism spectrum disorder, epigenetics and social perception. He is a member of the International Society for Autism Research, the Society for Experimental Social Psychology and the Social and Affective Neuroscience Society.

Sponsored by UMW’s chapter of Psi Chi, the international honor society in psychology, the symposium provides a forum for students to share their research and findings with their professors and peers.

For more information, contact Mindy Erchull, associate professor of psychology, at (540) 654-1557.

Liss and Erchull Publish in Psychology of Women

Miriam Liss, professor of psychology, and Mindy Erchull, associate professor of psychology, published a paper in the September 2013 issue of Psychology of Women Quarterly titled “Differences in Beliefs and Behaivors Between Feminist Actual and Anticipated Mothers.” They found that feminist non-mothers anticipated an egalitarian division of labor but feminist mothers were more likely to do the majority of the household chores and childcare. They also found that young feminist women anticipating motherhood hoping to give their children nontraditional name choices while feminist mothers were more likely to give their children their husbands’ last name.

UMW Hosted Psi Chi Research Symposium

Bruce Rybarczyk, associate professor and director of clinical psychology at Virginia Commonwealth University, delivered the keynote address at the 28th annual Psi Chi Symposium for Undergraduate Research in Psychology at the University of Mary Washington. The lecture, “The Sleep System: Your Owner’s Manual for Maintenance and Repair,” was held on Friday, April 19 from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. in Chandler Hall, Room 102.

Bruce Rybarczyk, associate professor of psychology at Virginia Commonwealth University
Photo courtesy of VCU

As part of the symposium, psychology students presented their research during sessions on Thursday, April 18 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Friday, April 19 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Chandler Hall, Room 102. A reception followed the conclusion of the symposium on Friday.

Ryabarczyk is a faculty member and director of the clinical psychology program at VCU.  His research focuses on understanding and facilitating the psychological adaption to chronic medical illness and disability. Ryabarczyk’s studies, which have been published in numerous scholarly journals and book chapters, include coping mechanisms and intervention techniques for recovering patients and behavioral sleep medicine.

Sponsored by UMW’s chapter of Psi Chi, the international honor society in psychology, the symposium provides a forum for students to share their research and findings with professors and peers.

For more information, contact Mindy Erchull, associate professor of psychology, at (540) 654-1557.

David Rettinger Named Executive Director of Center for Honor, Leadership and Service

The University of Mary Washington has named David A. Rettinger as executive director of the newly formed Center for Honor, Leadership and Service. Rettinger, a member of UMW’s psychology faculty since 2006, will remain in his role as associate professor.

As executive director, Rettinger will promote collaboration between faculty and student services, develop new programs and coursework and facilitate communication on campus about honor, service and leadership. He also will conduct research on academic integrity and serve as the content expert on honor.

The center aims to enhance and deepen student learning through best practices, educational competency and skill sets for leadership and service grounded in the core value of honor. Starting with the fall semester, the center will involve students in the areas of honor, leadership and service through leadership training and development, an annual leadership conference, honor training, service learning opportunities and immersion experiences, as well as special programs and events throughout the year.

“Honor, leadership and service are at the heart of UMW’s ethos and the center was created with the goal of placing these three virtues at the heart of the Mary Washington experience,” Rettinger said. “Our goal is to provide students with opportunities both within and beyond the curriculum to develop as leaders in pursuit of an honorable life in service to communities great and small.”

Rettinger has been the faculty advisor to the UMW Honor Council since 2008. An expert on moral decision making and academic integrity, his research on student cheating and academic honor issues has been widely published in academic journals, including most recently in Ethics & Behavior and Research in Higher Education.

In February, Rettinger presented “Impulsivity and Emotion: Leveraging Individual Differences to Reduce Cheating” at an international higher education conference in Germany. Also at the conference, Rettinger gave a presentation on UMW’s honor system and honor code.

Rettinger received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan and a master’s degree and doctorate from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

For more information about the Center, visit http://students.umw.edu/chls/.

Chris Kilmartin to be Featured on Public Radio Program

During an interview on the “With Good Reason” public radio program, Chris Kilmartin, professor of psychology, examines how anti-feminine taunts reinforce the fiction that men are sexually indiscriminate. The interview originally aired in July 2011 on public radio stations across Virginia.

The interview will be re-aired beginning Saturday, August 18 on several Virginia public radio stations, as well as stations across the U.S. The segment, “Real Men,” also is available online at http://withgoodreasonradio.org/2012/08/real-men-2/.

Liss and Schiffrin’s Study Appears on Time Magazine Website

Miriam Liss

Holly Schiffrin

A recent study by Associate Professors of Psychology Miriam Liss and Holly Schiffrin and 2012 graduate Kathryn Rizzo appears in the article “Smother Mother: Why Intensive Child Rearing Hurts Parents and Kids,” published on Time.com on Friday, July 13.

The study, “Insight into the Parenthood Paradox: Mental Health Outcomes of Intensive Mothering,” also is mentioned in a recent op-ed in the New York Post.

Liss and Schiffrin’s Study Garners National Media Attention

Miriam Liss

Associate Professors of Psychology Miriam Liss and Holly Schiffrin’s study “Insight into the Parenthood Paradox: Mental Health Outcomes of Intensive Mothering” has attracted national media attention. Liss and Schiffrin co-authored with study, published in the Journal of Child and Family Studies, with 2012 graduate Kathryn Rizzo.

References to the study appear in numerous media outlets, including Chronicle of Higher Education, Forbes.com and Buzz Feed. Schiffrin also discusses the study in an interview on radio station 1320 WILS.

 

 

Holly Schiffrin

Psychology Faculty and Students Publish Papers

Psychology faculty members and students have two papers accepted for publication in the Journal of Child and Family Studies.

“Development and Validation of a Quantitative Measure of Intensive Parenting Attitudes” is co-authored by Miriam Liss, associate professor of psychology, Holly Schiffrin, associate professor of psychology, Virginia Mackintosh, assistant professor of psychology, Haley Miles-McLean, a current UMW student and Mindy Erchull, associate professor of psychology.

“Insight into the Parenthood Paradox: Mental Health Outcomes of Intensive Mothering” is co-authored by Schiffrin, Liss and Kathryn Rizzo, a 2012 UMW graduate.

New Study by Erchull and Liss Garners Media Attention

Mindy Erchull

Associate professors of psychology Mindy Erchull and Miriam Liss’ study “Feminism and Attachment Parenting: Attitudes, Stereotypes, and Misperceptions” appears in the June 2012 edition of the journal Sex Roles.

The study, based on a survey of hundreds of self-described feminists and non-feminists, shows that attachment parenting techniques, like co-sleeping, breastfeeding and carrying a child in a body sling, are more popular with feminists than non-feminists. The study also reveals that people hold stereotypes about the ‘typical feminist,’ when in fact those stereotypes aren’t true.

Liss and Erchull’s study has appeared in various media outlets, including Buzz Feed, Science Daily and Counsel & Heal.

Miriam Liss

Holly Schiffrin Talks Psychology & Design at Workshop

Holly Schiffrin

Holly Schiffrin presented during a four-hour workshop at the annual meeting of the American Institute of Architects National Convention and Design Exposition in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday, May 16. The workshop, “Happiness and Architecture: Linking Design to Positive Psychology,” also featured Charles First, an architect with HEERY that has been working on the Dahlgren campus. Other co-presenters included Tim Bachman and Connie Hom of Buckingham Greenery.