July 22, 2014

Day of Silence, 4/20

It is that time of year again – the UMW Day of Silence is Friday, April 20.  If your department didn’t donate, you can still get a shirt!

If you are unfamiliar with what the Day of Silence is, check out this video by Anand Rao’s Social Movements Class from Spring 2011:

Come to the front of Lee Hall between 11 and 2 this week and next week until we run out!

 

Women’s History Month

Exhibit: on Hold

Thursday, March 1 5 p.m., Combs Hall, Room 139

Anne Leighton Massoni is a contemporary female photographer who deals with issues of history, infertility, lineage, and identity with women who have a family history of breast and ovarian cancer. She uses both created images and found imagery to represent an underlying story which touches on the personal while still attempting the collective.

 

Great Lives Lecture Series: Louisa May Alcott (by Harriet Reisen)

Tuesday, March 13 7:30 p.m., Dodd Auditorium, George Washington Hall

 

Seminar: Is the Arab Spring a Women’s Winter?

Wednesday, March 14 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center

The Arab revolution that started January 2011 influenced the Middle East and put an end to dictatorship systems in at least three countries. The demonstrations further transformed traditional perspectives and depictions of Arab women as silent and passive victims. The atmosphere of the region with reference to a variety of discussions on gender equality, social justice, human rights, and democracy emerged after the successes of the Arab Spring.

 

Women’s Research Symposium

Wednesday March 14 4-6 p.m., Red Room, Woodard Campus Center

Please join UMW students as they showcase their undergraduate research in women’s studies. Cash prizes will be awarded to winners. Contact Professor Cooperman at rcooperm@umw.edu for more information regarding submitting an entry.

 

Great Lives Lecture Series: Juliette Gordon Low (by Stacy A. Cordery)

Thursday March 15 7:30 p.m., Dodd Auditorium, George Washington Hall

 

Adelante Mujeres!

Monday March 19 5:30 p.m., Lee Hall, Room 411

Adelante Mujeres! is a documentary that explores the lives, culture, and history of Mexican-American women. Professors Connie Smith and Jessica Locke will facilitate a discussion following the viewing of this film.

 

Latin American Women on the Spot

Monday March 19 6:15 p.m., Lee Hall, Room 411

Join UMW students in an exciting presentation, coordinated by Professors Elizabeth Lewis and María Laura Bocaz, of various posters that provide pictures and essential information of outstanding Latin American women in the arts, sciences, literature, politics, and other areas.

 

Women and Politics in the Era of the American Revolution

Tuesday March 20 7 p.m., Monroe Hall, Room 116

Join Dr. Rosemarie Zagarri, professor of history at George Mason University, as she discusses womanhood as it was understood and experienced in 18th- and early 19th- Century America. She will provide insight into the lives of women in this era, with a special focus on James Monroe’s wife, Elizabeth Monroe.

 

Social Justice Brown Bag Lunch Discussion: Human Trafficking

Wednesday March 21 Noon, Woodard Campus Center, Meeting Room 1

The Social Dynamics of Family Violence

Wednesday March 21 7 p.m., Monroe Hall, Room 116

Research shows that one in four women is a victim of violence. Join Dr. Angela Hattery, sociologist and associate director of the program in women’s and gender studies at George Mason University, as she discusses this research with an emphasis on intimate partner violence.

Poetry Readings

Thursday March 22 5-5:30 p.m., Combs Hall, Room 139

Join Professors Ana Chichester and Connie Smith as they present a series of bilingual readings of poet Claribel Alegria. The poet, who is from El Salvador, has written several collections of poetry about women’s empowerment.

 

Women’s History Month Keynote Speaker: Dr. Danielle McGuire

Thursday, March 22, 7 p.m., 2012 Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center

Danielle McGuire is a writer and assistant professor in the history department at Wayne State University. Since receiving a doctorate from
Rutgers in 2007, McGuire has won numerous teaching and research awards. Her dissertation on sexualized racial violence and the African-American freedom struggle received the 2008 Lerner Scott Prize for best dissertation in women’s history. She is the author of At the Dark End of the Street.

 

Self-Help or Self-Hurt?

Thursday, March 26, 5 p.m.,  Meeting Room 1, Woodard Campus Center

Join the Black Student Association as they lead a discussion about men who write self-help books for and about women. The discussion will center on whether the information and advice presented in these books help or just reinforce patriarchal ideas that previously existed in society.

Film and Discussion: The Vision of Wangari Maathai

Tuesday, March 27, 5 p.m., Chandler Hall, Room 102

This documentary chronicles the life and activism of Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, Wangari Muta Maathai, the founder of the Green Belt Movement, who became a world-renowned environmentalist and women’s rights activist with the seemingly simple idea of planting trees. Join the African Student Union and Women of Color as they view the film and discuss Maathai’s life and legacy.

 

Film and Discussion: Miss Representation

Wednesday, March 28 7 p.m., Monroe Hall, Room 116

This film educates the audience by exposing the media’s negative portrayal of women and its effects on girls. It seeks to empower women by identifying the steps toward eliminating these portrayals and effects.

 

V-Day UMW “The Vagina Monologues” 2012

Friday, March 30 and Saturday 31 8 p.m., Lee Hall, Room 411

Cost: $3 in advance; $5 at the door

Email em.c.butler@gmail.com to purchase tickets

The 9th annual UMW production of The Vagina Monologues, written by Eve Ensler, uses the arts to explore women’s issues of sex, love, rape, abuse, relationships, menstruation, and childbirth. By promoting inner beauty and self-worth, The Vagina Monologues celebrates the true essence of the vagina, femininity, and the ability to speak out against the pressures of society.

Black History Month: My Black Is Beautiful: Footprints, Reflections and Paths

Steel Drum Band

Wednesday, Feb. 1

7 p.m.; Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center

Join the James Farmer Multicultural Center for the commencement of the 2012 Black History Month Celebration as Ewabo plays an eclectic range of music that incorporates soul, R&B, and funk music on Caribbean steel drums.

 

Library Exhibit: Celebrate Black History Month

Feb. 1-29

Simpson Library will feature written and digital resources from the UMW libraries collections that highlight prominent African-American women and African-American history and culture.

 

Dinner: Cuisines of Black Cultures

Monday, Feb. 6

Seacobeck Hall

Dinner cost: one meal-plan meal or $10.30 plus tax

Eagle Dining will feature African and Caribbean cuisines.

 

Social Justice Brown Bag Lunch Discussion: Prison Industrial Complex

Wednesday, Feb. 8

Noon; Woodard Campus Center, Meeting Room 4

 

Film Discussion: The Prep School Negro

Wednesday, Feb. 8

6 p.m.; Combs Hall, Room 139

André Robert Lee’s film portrays how a full scholarship to a Philadelphia prep school was supposed to be his way out of the ghetto, how he paid a high personal cost for the elite education, and looks inside today’s continuing racial naïveté. Co-sponsored by the James Farmer Visiting Professor Committee, James Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Civil Rights and Social Justice, Office of Student Affairs, Department of History and American Studies, and Department of Sociology and Anthropology.

 

An Evening of Jazz: A Tribute to America’s Great Black Artists

Thursday, Feb. 9

8 p.m.; The Underground, Lee Hall

The UMW Faculty Jazz Ensemble will feature works by legendary African-American jazz musicians. Co-sponsored by the UMW Department of Music.

 

Gospelfest

Sunday, Feb. 12

4 p.m.; Dodd Auditorium, George Washington Hall

An evening of gospel music and spiritual uplift with choirs, singing groups, and praise dance teams. Co-sponsored by Voices of Praise.

 

James Farmer Visiting Professor Lecturer and Black History Month
Keynote Speaker: Angela Davis

Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2012
7 p.m., Dodd Auditorium, George Washington Hall
Co-sponsored by the James Farmer Visiting Professor Committee

An icon of the nation’s quest for social justice, activist and scholar Angela Davis has spent decades building communities of struggle for economic, racial, and gender equality. The author of eight books, Davis has served for the last 15 years as professor of feminist studies and professor of history of consciousness, an interdisciplinary doctoral program, at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

Co-sponsored by the James Farmer Visiting Professor Committee, James Farmer Multicultural Center, and the AT&T Student Leadership Colloquium.

 

Essence of African-American Culture: Fashion and Arts

Friday, Feb. 17

7 p.m.; Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center

The Black Student Association will celebrate African and African-American culture with a talent show and Pan-African fashion show.

 

Lunch: Cuisines of Black Cultures

Monday, Feb. 20

Seacobeck Hall

Cost: one meal-plan meal or $8 for lunch.

Eagle Dining will feature Creole and Southern soul cuisines.

 

American Red Cross Blood Drive

Tuesday, Feb. 21

Noon-6 p.m.; Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center

Co-sponsored by the Black Student Association and Talk to the Hands.

Donate blood or to volunteer to assist with this event, email tragland@mail.umw.edu.

 

The Color of Sisterhood: African-American Camp Fire Girls, Girl Scouts, and Social Change

Wednesday, Feb. 22

7 p.m.; Combs Hall, Room 139

Georgetown University Assistant Professor of History Marcia Chatelain will explore the role of African-American women’s activism in desegregation and in transforming national girls’ organizations. Co-sponsored by the Women’s and Gender Studies Program and the Department of History and American Studies.

 

22nd Annual Step Show and Competition

Saturday, Feb. 25

7 p.m. (doors open at 6:30 p.m.); Dodd Auditorium, George Washington Hall

Cost: $7; $5 with UMW ID

An array of the area’s most talented step teams will engage in a high energy, entertaining competition. Co-sponsored by Women of Color and the Black Student Association.

 

Film Discussion: Brother Outsider: The Life of Bayard Rustin

Tuesday, Feb. 28

6 p.m.; Chandler Hall, Room 102

A disciple of Gandhi, a mentor to Martin Luther King Jr., and the architect of the 1963 March on Washington, Bayard Rustin was an openly gay man during the fiercely homophobic ’40s, ’50s, and ’60s. This documentary explores his activism for peace, racial equality, economic justice, and human rights. Sponsored by PRISM- People for the Rights of Sexual Minorities.

Click here to view this calendar as a PDF

Islamic Cultural Celebration: Islam Through The Ages

Islamic culture and religion has evolved and transformed over the centuries, broadening its traditional principles to become more open and progressive while still maintaining the integrity of its spiritual origins. Over time, events in Islamic culture have enlightened and even contributed to modern society. The Islamic Student Association and James Farmer Multicultural Center invite you to celebrate the vast Islamic culture and discover how it fits in with contemporary Western ideologies and values. Increase your awareness of the many Islamic contributions to the overall achievements of humanity, whether they be technological, ethical, cultural, or moral.

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Henna Night
Monday, November 28
Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center; 5 p.m.

The art of Henna is often thought of as being part of Islamic religion, but, in fact, it is part of its culture. The decorative body art has been in existence longer than Islam and is celebrated by individuals from around the world. Please join the Islamic Student Association as they address the history of Henna in combination with the opportunity to express yourself in utilizing this form of body art.

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Islamic Invention Display
Tuesday, November 29
Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center; 1 p.m. – 7 p.m.

While the Dark Ages consumed most of the world, the Islamic Empire carried the light of human civilization. Ranging from India to Spain, the Islamic Empire, from the Caliphates to the Ottoman Empire, were the world’s leaders in technology, medicine, and innovation. Come explore the inventions and discoveries that the Islamic Empire has contributed to the history of the world and modern society.

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Islam And Science: Movie Night
Film and Discussion
Wednesday, November 30
Monroe Hall, Room 116; 6:30 p.m.

Terms like algebra, algorithm and alkali are all Arabic in origin and at the very heart of modern science – there would not be modern mathematics or physics without algebra, computers without algorithms, or chemistry without alkalis. Join Physicist Jim Al-Khalili in a captivating documentary, as he travels through Syria, Iran, Tunisia, and Spain to tell the story of the great leap in scientific knowledge that took place in the Islamic world between the 8th and 14th Centuries.

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Islamic Cultural Banquet
Cultural Awareness Series Keynote Speaker: Imam Yahya Hendi
Thursday, December 1
Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center; 6 p.m.

The Islamic Cultural Banquet offers traditional food, fellowship, and a keynote lecture from Imam Yahya Hendi. Imam Hendi is the Muslim Chaplain at Georgetown University, the first American university to hire a full-time Muslim Chaplain. He has written numerous publications on many topics, including Islam and biomedical ethics, and religion and Islam in the United States. A sought-after speaker, Imam Hendi has presented a multitude of interfaith and general lectures in the U.S., Asia, Africa, Europe, Central Asia, Eastern Europe, Australia, and the Middle East over the past 14 years. He has traveled to more than 63 countries and 45 U.S. states for conferences.

 

 

 

Native American Cultural Keynote Performer: Bill Miller

Monday, Nov. 14

7 p.m., Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center

For years, Bill Miller’s music has moved audiences around the world. An icon of the Native American music community, Miller has won three Grammys in the last four years. Through music and discussion, Miller illustrates the relationship between majority and minority cultures. Instead of teaching tolerance and assimilation, he promotes a redemptive culture of understanding and peace.

 

 

 

 

Jewish Cultural Awareness Week

The basic understanding of the Jewish culture is a mix of both Jewish law and Jewish traditions. The traditions keep the Jewish people united while the laws keep the Jewish people steeped in history. Today the line between these two important aspects has been blurred, and laws and traditions have become one and the same. It is important to understand the differences between the two and how these differences make the Jewish culture what it is today. Please join the Jewish Student Association and the James Farmer Multicultural Center in this two week celebration highlighting the laws and traditions of Jewish culture.

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Israeli Folk Dancing
November 7
Lee Hall 411, 4 – 5:30 p.m.

To celebrate Jewish culture, join the Jewish Student Association for a night of traditional dancing. There will be a mix of traditional and modern dances. These dances are easy to learn and there is no skill level needed. Join us in this fun and meaningful cultural tradition that spans the generations.

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Riding Into The West:
Jewish Life Across America
November 9
Lee Hall 412, 6 – 9 p.m.

The Frisco Kid is a film about a Polish rabbi who wanders through the Old West on his way to lead a synagogue in San Francisco. On the way he is nearly burnt at the stake by Indians and almost killed by outlaws. Please join the Jewish Student Association for the showing of the film and a discussion directly following the movie.

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Trivia Judaica
November 10
Underground, 8 p.m.

Think you know a lot about the J in JSA? Come out to trivia to see how much you really know about Jewish holidays, food, pop culture, religion and Israel. Play alone or with a group of friends.
Co-hosted by UPC.

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Laws Meet Jewish Life
November 15
Red Room, 6:30 – 9 p.m.

Jewish Student Association/Hillel are pleased to present Dr. Emile Lester from the Department of Political Science and International Affairs, who will be giving a lecture and discussion on the topic of Judaism and the United States Government. The topics that will be discussed during the presentation will range from Israel, social issues, economic issues, the influence of Judaism on the domestic and foreign policies of the United States, and the influence of Judaism historically and currently on the United States government.

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Jewish Cultural Celebration
Keynote Speaker:
Roya Hakakian
November 16
Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center, 7 p.m.

 

Celebrated poet and filmmaker Roya Hakakian is passionate about raising awareness of today’s human rights issues, many of which are overlooked. A founding member of the Iran Human Rights Documentation Center and a fellow at Yale’s Whitney Humanities Center, Hakakian has written Journey from the Land of No, an account of her life growing up as a Jewish teenager in post-revolutionary Iran.

 

 

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Shabbat Dinner:

A Traditional Weekly Feast
November 18
Faculty/Staff Dining Room,
Seacobeck Hall, 6 – 7:30 p.m.
Cost: Students – 1 meal + $4,
Non-students – $10

The Sabbath is the day of rest for the Jewish community that begins at sundown on Friday and continues until three stars appear in the sky on Saturday night. During this time Jews abstain from labor of any kind and spend the day with families and friends. Traditionally, Jewish families commence the Sabbath with Shabbat dinner on Friday night. Come and enjoy a traditional Shabbat dinner and learn more about this weekly tradition.

 

 

GLBTTQQIAAP Celebration| Stand Out! Speak Up!| (October 19-28)

STAND OUT! SPEAK UP!

If all people are to get the same opportunities and rights, then everyone must Stand Out! Speak Up! Societal norms seem to be shifting, queer rights and other GLBTTQQIAAP issues are becoming more prevalent in American politics. There have been legal victories, but there’s still a long way to travel on the road to egalitarianism. Join PRISM – People for the Rights of Sexual Minorities – and the James Farmer Multicultural Center to celebrate the courage to stand out and speak up for one’s beliefs and values.

GLBTTQQIAAP Kickoff Celebration
October 19
4-6 p.m., Ball Circle
(Rain location: Great Hall,Woodard Campus Center)

PRISM welcomes the entire campus community to share in a kickoff celebration that fuses food, live music, and fun. Read “PostSecret” style coming-out stories and be inspired by the experiences, struggles, and victories of your peers.

In this corner….. Fight for Your Rights Panel Discussion
October 20
6 p.m., Lee Hall, Room 411

Join faculty, staff, and students as they discuss the many issues facing queer students at UMW. Learn about resources and tools that encourage positive change so you’ll be equipped to Speak Up!

PRISM Prom – Rio Carnival
October 22
8 p.m., Great Hall,Woodard Campus Center
Cost: $3
(Formal attire strongly encouraged)

Standing out at the high school prom might have made for a bad memory, but the memorable PRISM Prom can help undo all that. Look great and proudly stand out while you enjoy all the prom’s trappings – music, dancing, photos, and refreshments.

Changing Time, Changing Policies?
Debate on Protected Classes
October 24
6 p.m., Lee Hall, Room 411

UMW students debate whether sexual orientation and gender identity should be protected classes in Virginia and whether they should be included in the non-discrimination policies of Virginia’s colleges and universities. Stand out and speak up on the issues that affect your community.

GLBTTQQIAAP Cultural Celebration Keynote Performer: Andrea Gibson
October 26
7 p.m., Lee Hall, Room 411

A powerful live performer, Andrea Gibson is the winner of the 2008 Women’s World Poetry Slam and has placed third in the world on two international poetry slam stages. With Gibson, the personal is political. Her themes deconstruct gender norms, sexuality, class, patriarchy, and white-supremacist capitalist culture.

Queer Film Festival
Featuring Milk and The Birdcage
October 27
6 p.m., Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center
(For mature audiences)

Milk tells the story of American gay rights activist Harvey Milk and his struggles as the first openly gay person to be elected to public office in California.

The Birdcage illustrates how standing out and speaking up can be difficult. A gay cabaret owner and his drag queen companion agree to their son’s request to put up a straight front when his fiancée’s anti-gay, moralistic parents come to call.

Social Justice Brown Bag Lunch Series

 

Topic of Discussion: What is Social Justice?

Purpose:  Engage students, faculty, and staff to discuss issues of social justice together in an informal setting

When: Wednesday, September 14, 2011 @ 12:00 noon

Where: Woodard Campus Center, Meeting Room 4

 

Please e-mail Matthew Johnson (mjohns22@umw.edu) to suggest a topic of discussion for future lunches and volunteer to lead a session.

Questions?

Please contact the James Farmer Multicultural Center

(540) 654-1044

 

Latino Identities Month 2011 “Our Heritage is a Celebration”

Rich in heritage and history, the Latino culture embodies the essence of diversity. As we learn and understand the significant impact this fascinating culture has had within the United States and beyond, our society will begin to understand the unique threads that fuse individuals from an array of backgrounds and interests together into one harmonious celebration of life. Exploring the various ethnicities that personify the Latino culture, the Latino Student Association  and James Farmer Multicultural Center invite you on a journey to travel the world in order to celebrate our heritage and yours!

Kickoff Celebration

Featuring Kevin Davis and Ban Caribe

September 15| 4-6 p.m.| Ball Circle

(Rain location: Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center)

Begin the journey of exploring Latino culture through a celebration that fuses food, live entertainment, and fun. Meet members of the Latino Student Association and discover what wonderful programs are featured throughout the month.

Latino Culture in the United States

D.R.E.A.M. Act or Nightmare?

Exploring the Impact of the D.R.E.A.M. Act on the U.S. Economy and Educational System

September 19| 6 p.m.| Lee Hall, 411

Facilitated by UMW Associate Professor College of Business , Raul Chavez

Cultural Awareness Series & Latino Identities Month Keynote Speaker Bobby González

September 21| 7 p.m.| Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center

Bobby González is a nationally known multicultural motivational speaker, storyteller, and poet. Born and raised in the South Bronx, New York City, González grew up in a bicultural environment. He draws on his Native American − Taino − and Latino − Puerto Rican − roots to offer a unique repertoire of discourses, readings, and performances that celebrates his indigenous heritage.

Latino Culture in Central America and the Caribbean

Please Don’t Stop the Music: An Exploration of Latin Roots in Popular Music

September 26| 6 p.m.| Lee Hall, 411

Zumba Bash

Featuring Certified Zumba Instructor, Carlos Reyes

September 28| 6 p.m.| Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center

(Recommended for adult audiences)

Latino Culture in South America

Read Between the Lines…

Literary Seminar highlighting authors Gabriel Garcia Marquez &Mario Vargas Llosa

October 3| 6p.m.| Lee Hall, 411

Facilitated by UMW Assistant Professor of Spanish, Mariá Laura Bocaz

Taste of Latino Culture

Dinner Theatre Featuring Quique Aviles

October 5| 5-7 p.m.| Faculty/Staff Dining Room, Seacobeck Hall

Combining authentic South American cuisine and the poetic talents of Quique Aviles, participants are invited to continue their journey and celebration of Latino culture and heritage. Quique Aviles is a poet and performer whose talents address social issues. A native of El Salvador and a graduate of the Duke Ellington School of the Arts, Quique has been writing and performing in the United States for over 20 years. His poetry has been featured on NPR’s “Latino USA” and on subway posters through Washington’s “Metro Muse.” A 1991 recipient of the Washington, DC Mayor’s Arts Awards, he is founder and artistic director of Sol & Soul, where he continues a lifelong commitment to mentoring emerging artists and helping young people find their voice.

Latino Culture in Spain & Beyond

Is the World Going Broke?

The Economic and Cultural State of Spain

October 10| 6 p.m.| Lee Hall, 411

Feria

October 12| 4-6 p.m.| Ball Circle

(Rain location: Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center)

The Latino Identities Month cultural journey culminates with a celebration filled with an array of festivities to include live entertainment, dancing, and a fashion show provided by members of the UMW campus community.

 

Cultural Awareness Series 2011-2012

Over the past 18 years, the Cultural Awareness Series has grown more successful and has become highly anticipated thanks to your continued support. The James Farmer Multicultural Center invites you to join us for a new and exciting year. The speakers and performances scheduled for this year’s Cultural Awareness Series aim to promote a greater understanding and appreciation of diversity in race, gender, nationality, sexual orientation, religion, age, and culture.

A detailed list of scheduled speakers and performers can be found at www.umw.edu/multicultural. For questions, please contact the James Farmer Multicultural Center at (540) 654-1044 or visit our office in Lee Hall, room 211.

Latino Identities Month Keynote Speaker: Bobby González

Wednesday, Sept. 21 | 7 p.m. | Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center

GLBTTQQIAAP Cultural Celebration Keynote Performer: Andrea Gibson

Wednesday, Oct. 26 | 7 p.m. | Lee Hall, 411

Asian Cultural Celebration Keynote Performer: Tai Yim Kung Fu School Lion Dance and Kung Fu Demonstrations

Wednesday, Nov. 2 | 7 p.m. | Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center

Taste of Asia

Friday, Nov. 4 | 7 p.m. | Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center

Co-sponsored by the Asian Student Association

 Native American Cultural Keynote Performer: Bill Miller

Monday, Nov. 14 | 7 p.m. | Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center

 Jewish Cultural Celebration Keynote Speaker: Roya Hakakian

Wednesday, Nov. 16 | 7 p.m. | Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center

Islamic Cultural Celebration Banquet

Thursday, Dec. 1 | 6 p.m. | Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center

Co-sponsored by the Islamic Student Association

Kwanzaa

Monday, Dec. 5 | 6 p.m. | Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center

 Co-Sponsored by the Black Student Association

The University of Mary Washington Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Keynote Speaker: Dr. Marc Lamont Hill

Wednesday, Jan. 18 | 4 p.m. | Dodd Auditorium, George Washington Hall

Sponsored by the Office of the President

The James Farmer Visiting Professor Lecturer and Black History Month Keynote Speaker: Dr. Angela Davis

Wednesday, Feb. 15 | 7 p.m. | Dodd Auditorium, George Washington Hall

Co-sponsored by the James Farmer Visiting Professor Committee

Step Show Competition

Saturday, Feb. 25 | 7 p.m. | Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Dodd Auditorium, George Washington Hall | Cost: $7 general admission, $5 UMW

Women’s History Month Keynote Speaker: Dr. Danielle McGuire

Thursday, March 22 | 7 p.m. | Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center

Passover

Monday, April 9 | 6 p.m. | Faculty/Staff Dining Room, Seacobeck Hall

 For cost please contact the James Farmer Multicultural Center. Co-sponsored by the Jewish Student Association

22nd Annual Multicultural Fair

Saturday, April 14 − rain or shine | 10 a.m. − 5 p.m. | UMW campus