October 30, 2020

Family Weekend: Connecting With UMW From the Comfort of Home

For the first time ever, UMW’s beloved fall tradition known as Family Weekend is going virtual, with events and activities throughout the weekend of Oct. 29 through Nov. 1.

For the first time ever, UMW’s beloved fall tradition known as Family Weekend is going virtual, with events and activities throughout the weekend of Oct. 29 through Nov. 1.

Every fall, University of Mary Washington students gather with loved ones on campus for exciting events and activities that showcase Eagle life.

Now in its 47th year, Mary Washington’s Family Weekend is going virtual for the first time. Even in the digital realm, this beloved tradition, held Oct. 29 through Nov. 1, promises families ample opportunities for quality time together while apart.

“Virtual Family Weekend allows families the flexibility to decide when they want to engage together,” said Marissa DiMeo, of the Office of University Events and Conferencing. Much of the digital content will be available around the clock, thus “eliminating the stress of missing out on events that occur at the same time.” And there’s no need to worry about the weather. Read more.

Hillel Center to Serve as a Nest for Eagles

UMW hosted a socially distanced soft opening yesterday for the Maxine and Carl D. Silver Hillel Center. President Troy Paino described it as an “intellectual, social and cultural hub” for students and the broader Jewish community. Photo by Karen Pearlman.

UMW hosted a socially distanced soft opening yesterday for the Maxine and Carl D. Silver Hillel Center. President Troy Paino described it as an “intellectual, social and cultural hub” for students and the broader Jewish community. Photo by Karen Pearlman.

Growing up, Fredericksburg native Larry Silver spent many hours hanging out on what were then open fields of the nearby Mary Washington College.

How fitting that decades later, the real estate investor has established a place at Mary Washington for students to hang out. Silver, based now in Boca Raton, Florida, was on hand yesterday for a “socially distanced soft opening” of the Maxine and Carl D. Silver Hillel Center at University of Mary Washington.

“My parents loved Fredericksburg and they loved the university,” Larry Silver said during a small ceremony in front of the Center, at the corner of College Avenue and Payne Street. “This is a great way to honor them.” Read more.

Fun Is Not Canceled: A Student To-Do List

Even with strict health guidelines in place, there is still plenty to do at UMW, including this “Halloweens” event. A special calendar and list contain a collection of activities and ideas for staying engaged.

Even with strict health guidelines in place, there is still plenty to do at UMW, including this “Halloweens” event. A special calendar and list contain a collection of activities and ideas for staying engaged.

The bell tower on Double Drive still chimes twice a day. Campus Walk clamors with students changing classes. Adirondack chairs continue to migrate all over Ball Circle – except for the space occupied by the white dining tent that went up this spring due to COVID-19.

In an unprecedented semester of health guidelines, there are plenty of do’s and don’ts. Time-honored Mary Washington traditions are still on track, but they’re looking more digital and distanced these days. In the midst of it all, University of Mary Washington students just want to have fun.

A calendar of scheduled events and “The List,” a growing document of brainstormed diversions – learn a TikTok dance, create a time capsule, grab a free Campus Rec Frisbee – show what students CAN do on campus.

“Fun is not canceled,” said Student Activities and Engagement Director Sandrine Sutphin, who’s working with other departments to push out ideas to keep students involved, connected and de-stressed. “You don’t have to sit in your room. There are still lots of things you can do.” Read more.

Virtual Leadership Colloquium Aims to Help Women ‘Level-Up’

University of Mary Washington’s 27th annual Women’s Leadership Colloquium @UMW will be held virtually this year.

University of Mary Washington’s 27th annual Women’s Leadership Colloquium @UMW will be held virtually this year.

The Women’s Leadership Colloquium @UMW is changing things up. The 27th annual event, held virtually this year, includes a new special session for senior leaders and puts a techy spin on tried-and-true offerings, with Zoom-room breakouts and an abbreviated agenda to accommodate the busy multi-taskers who typically attend.

“We’ve challenged ourselves to offer the same quality experience attendees have come to expect, but in a new way,” said UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson, who chairs the colloquium board. “The day will be different, but it’s another terrific program.”

A staple of coaching and camaraderie for women who strive to reach new heights in their chosen careers, the colloquium provides tools, strategies and inspiration for “leveling-up” leadership skills, both professionally and personally. The morning-long event features a Rolodex of networking opportunities, breakout sessions and more, plus a motivational keynote address. Private timeslots with prominent Fredericksburg-area coaching professionals and a workshop for senior leaders are available in the afternoon for an additional fee.

“Everyone will have the best seat in the house,” UMW Executive Director of Continuing and Professional Studies Kimberly Young said of this year’s virtual format. “It’s shorter, so there’s less time away from work, and none of this will sacrifice networking.” Read more.

Camera Captures UMW’s Resolve During COVID-19

Bench-sitting looks a little bit different in the time of COVID-19, but UMW juniors Kira Frazee (left) and Allison Bliss find a way to enjoy the popular UMW pastime while seated separately. Photo by Suzanne Carr Rossi.

Bench-sitting looks a little bit different in the time of COVID-19, but UMW juniors Kira Frazee (left) and Allison Bliss find a way to enjoy the popular UMW pastime while seated separately. Photo by Suzanne Carr Rossi.

Masks are typically worn on Halloween. Social distancing is practiced during flu-season physicians’ visits. COVID-19 has flung these phenomena into the mainstream and into microcosms of it, on college campuses everywhere. As the University of Mary Washington community perseveres through the pandemic – monitoring, masking, distancing, cleaning, testing and more – a rigorous liberal arts and sciences education remains the mission.

The Fredericksburg campus has been reimagined – classrooms reconfigured, athletic conditioning modified, residence halls re-arranged, dining options altered – with a focus on slowing the spread of the virus and continuing to provide a transformative college experience.

So what does UMW really look like these days? Here, in 22 photos, Mary Washington shares a snapshot of campus life during COVID-19. Read more.

Phi Beta Kappa Inducts Stars at Academics and Adaptability

Senior Nichole Boigegrain is one of 34 UMW students elected to Phi Beta Kappa, one of the nation’s oldest and most prestigious academic societies. Here, she stands with the PBK marker on Campus Walk. UMW’s Kappa of Virginia chapter celebrates its 50th anniversary this fall. Photo by Suzanne Carr Rossi.

Senior Nichole Boigegrain is one of 34 UMW students elected to Phi Beta Kappa, one of the nation’s oldest and most prestigious academic societies. Here, she stands with the PBK marker on Campus Walk. UMW’s Kappa of Virginia chapter celebrates its 50th anniversary this fall. Photo by Suzanne Carr Rossi.

The University of Mary Washington inducted 34 students earlier this year into Phi Beta Kappa, one of the nation’s oldest and most prestigious academic honor societies.

Founded in 1776 – the same year as the signing of the Declaration of Independence – the organization is dedicated to championing a liberal arts and sciences education. In the midst of the American Revolution, Phi Beta Kappa’s founders recognized that institutions needed to be “a grounding force and elevating influence in turbulent times,” according to its website – a principle the society upholds today.

Notable members include presidents and Supreme Court justices, activists W.E.B. DuBois and Helen Keller, former Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice and bestselling author Ta-Nehisi Coates.

Nichole Boigegrain joined the ranks of that elite group of scholars, including those who have been initiated into UMW’s Kappa of Virginia chapter over the last half century, since its founding in 1970. But she had to navigate through some 21st-century problems along the way. Read more.

Great Lives Series Explores Perceptions of Past Presidents

In the midst of 2020’s contentious presidential election season, most Americans are looking ahead – to Nov. 3 and beyond. In the meantime, UMW Professor Emeritus of History William B. Crawley is looking backward, serving up some snapshots of past presidents.

With the spring Great Lives series cut short by COVID-19, Crawley decided to videotape, starting in August, a mini-series of lectures about several U.S. presidents, the lives of whom he deems great, or at least notable – Thomas Jefferson, the two Roosevelts, Woodrow Wilson and Harry Truman.

The Great Presidential Lives mini-series of lectures by UMW Professor Emeritus of History William B. Crawley features videotaped lectures on Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Woodrow Wilson and John F. Kennedy.

The Great Presidential Lives mini-series of lectures by UMW Professor Emeritus of History William B. Crawley features videotaped lectures on Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Woodrow Wilson and John F. Kennedy.

 

The sixth and final lecture will be tomorrow: John F. Kennedy: “Camelot” and the Question of Style vs. Substance. The JFK lecture, as well as the other five – all approximately one hour – are available on the Great Lives website. Some of the lectures also are being rebroadcast as part of C-SPAN’s “The Presidency” series and will remain available on the UMW Page of the network’s free video library.

“I chose the six mainly because I’ve always found them to be especially interesting,” Crawley said. “Each was controversial in his own way in his own times and has continued to be the subject of changing historiographical interpretations over the years.” Read more.

Gari Melchers Painting Stolen by Nazis Finally Returned to Family

"Winter" by Gari Melchers.

“Winter” by Gari Melchers.

A painting by Gari Melchers that was looted by the Nazis 87 years ago was returned to the heirs of the Jewish family to whom it belonged, according to an Associated Press article. The painting, “Winter,” was among more than 1,000 pieces of art and artifacts stolen in 1933 from the Mosse family, prominent Berlin residents who were persecuted and forced to flee from Germany. The work bears a stunning resemblance to a Melchers’ painting, entitled “Skaters,” that is in the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts’ (PAFA) permanent collection. “Winter” was later auctioned off in New York City to Bartlett Arkell, the founder of the Beech-Nut Packing Co., who in turn, donated it to his museum in upstate New York, where it remained until recently. Read more.

UMW, City Work Together to Prevent Spread of Virus

First-year UMW student Caliyah Ash stands outside the Fredericksburg Area Museum, wearing a mask. A Fredericksburg/UMW joint task force is working to help ensure students comply with the University’s COVID-19 health guidelines even off campus.

First-year UMW student Caliyah Ash stands outside the Fredericksburg Area Museum, wearing a mask. A Fredericksburg/UMW joint task force is working to help ensure students comply with the University’s COVID-19 health guidelines even off campus.

Longtime partners, the University of Mary Washington and the City of Fredericksburg, have teamed up once again. This time, in an effort to slow the spread of coronavirus in the local community.

When in-person classes resumed at UMW on Sept. 14, after a three-week delay prompted by the pandemic, the University enforced a strict “MMDC” – monitor, mask, distance and clean – policy, with reminders and precautionary measures set up across campus. With large numbers of college students headed back to the Fredericksburg area, a COVID-19 Joint Task Force, comprised of city officials and university administrators, began meeting weekly in August, even before their return, to ensure guideline compliance both on and off campus.

“The open dialogue of this task force between the City and UMW is very helpful for tracking the efforts and effects of COVID-19 both on campus and elsewhere in the City,” said Fredericksburg Fire Chief Michael Jones. Read more.

Phi Beta Kappa Inducts Stars at Academics and Adaptability

The University of Mary Washington inducted 34 students earlier this year into Phi Beta Kappa, one of the nation’s oldest and most prestigious academic honor societies.

Senior Nichole Boigegrain is one of 34 UMW students elected to Phi Beta Kappa, one of the nation’s oldest and most prestigious academic societies. Here, she stands with the PBK marker on Campus Walk. UMW’s Kappa of Virginia chapter celebrates its 50th anniversary this fall. Photo by Suzanne Carr Rossi.

Senior Nichole Boigegrain is one of 34 UMW students elected to Phi Beta Kappa, one of the nation’s oldest and most prestigious academic societies. Here, she stands with the PBK marker on Campus Walk. UMW’s Kappa of Virginia chapter celebrates its 50th anniversary this fall. Photo by Suzanne Carr Rossi.

Founded in 1776 – the same year as the signing of the Declaration of Independence – the organization is dedicated to championing a liberal arts and sciences education. In the midst of the American Revolution, Phi Beta Kappa’s founders recognized that institutions needed to be “a grounding force and elevating influence in turbulent times,” according to its website – a principle the society upholds today.

Notable members include presidents and Supreme Court justices, activists W.E.B. DuBois and Helen Keller, former Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice and bestselling author Ta-Nehisi Coates.

Nichole Boigegrain joined the ranks of that elite group of scholars, including those who have been initiated into UMW’s Kappa of Virginia chapter over the last half century, since its founding in 1970. But she had to navigate through some 21st-century problems along the way. Read more.