March 1, 2021

Alumni Trio Adapts to Teaching in Madrid, Pandemic Style

Mary Washington alumna Cara Wissinger ’19 is among several UMW graduates who moved to Madrid to teach after studying abroad in Spain while in college.

Mary Washington alumna Cara Wissinger ’19 is among several UMW graduates who moved to Madrid to teach after studying abroad in Spain while in college.

When quarantine began in March 2020, Chloe Morton ’19 decided to improvise, creating virtual scavenger hunts to engage her middle and high school-aged students.

It’s a typical assignment in the age of COVID-19. But she also had to add English subtitles. After all, she is teaching in Spain.

One third of each graduating class at the University of Mary Washington studies abroad, so it’s no wonder that some decide to move overseas after graduation. Three 2019 alums – Morton, Thomas Peterson and Cara Wissinger – are among several Mary Washington graduates who have moved to Madrid to teach after participating in UMW’s study abroad program with Universidad de Deusto in Bilbao during college.

Teaching abroad in a global pandemic is no easy task. Here – in a Q&A – these recent UMW graduates share how they’re navigating life in a foreign country, thanks to skills they honed and support they received at Mary Washington. Read more.

‘Great Lives’ Lecture Series Continues with Goethe

Great Lives banner

The William B. Crawley Great Lives Lecture Series continues on Thursday, Feb. 25 with German poet and author Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, presented by UMW Professor Emeritus of German Sammy Merrill. The Davenport & Company Lecture.

Because of restrictions on public gatherings on campus, the entire series of 18 lectures will be pre-recorded and delivered electronically, through Zoom Webinars, with closed captioning available. Although the presentations will be taped in advance, there will still be a live Q&A session following the online debut of each lecture, in which the speaker will be available to answer questions submitted by audience members.

Portrait of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, 1749-1832, a German poet and author.

Portrait of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, 1749-1832, a German poet and author.

The German author, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe is known to most of the English-speaking world as the author of Faust, the story of a scholar, who, disillusioned with the course of his life, and seeking new directions to the truth, turns in frustration to the Devil and enters a compact with him. It is one of numerous plays that he wrote, along with hundreds of poems, and four major path-breaking novels.

His first major dramatic work was Goetz von Berlichingen, which immediately catapulted him into the forefront of the movement known as “Storm and Stress.” Similarly, his first novel, The Sorrows of Young Werther, was such a sensation that for much of Goethe’s life he was known as the author of Werther. He was also known outside the world of belles lettres for his writings on scientific topics as diverse as color theory, plant and animal morphology, and geology.

Duke Karl August appointed him chief minister of state, the highest official after the duke himself in the duchy of Weimar. During his lifetime Goethe enjoyed close personal and intellectual relationships with many women who were important for his development as an artist and a man. The body of work of this universal genius fills more than 133 volumes in the Weimar edition of his collected works.

Other upcoming lectures include former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, presented by Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Jason Davidson; Harlem Renaissance author Zora Neale Hurston and southern novelist Eudora Welty, presented by Professor of English and English Department Chair Gary Richards; and St. Augustine, presented by Associate Professor of Religious Studies Jennifer Barry. To learn more about Great Lives and view past and upcoming lectures, please visit https://www.umw.edu/greatlives/.

#UMWTogether – Contributing to the community and looking out for each other, Be the change

UMW student Yamila Merida spreads mulch for Tree Fredericksburg at Into the Streets last fall. Photo by Suzanne Carr Rossi.

UMW student Yamila Merida spreads mulch for Tree Fredericksburg at Into the Streets last fall. Photo by Suzanne Carr Rossi.

“Civic engagement is very important. We all live here together and we need to look out for one another.” – Elizabeth Goreham

Why is it so important to find a cause you love and volunteer your time? Spending time enriching your community is a great way to broaden your perceptions of the world. By immersing yourself in a community and surrounding yourself with people who are dedicated to bettering the world, you can learn so much about how the world works. You gain a unique sense of purpose by serving those around you, one which often manifests in other areas of your life. Giving back to the place you call home helps to unite the community and bridge some of the social, economic and political gaps.

Volunteering:  How helping others helps you

https://bigfuture.collegeboard.org/get-started/outside-the-classroom/volunteering-how-helping-others-helps-you

5 Benefits for giving back to the community

https://borgenproject.org/5-benefits-giving-back-community/

10 Ways You Can Make a Difference in Your Community

https://medium.com/the-whole-family-happiness-project/10-ways-you-can-make-a-difference-in-your-community-26f699a6a4bd

UMW’s Community Engagement webpage

https://academics.umw.edu/communityengagement/

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In fall 2019, prior to the pandemic, CCE’s Faculty Director Leslie Martin works with UMW first-years to stock the Eagle Resource Closet, a food pantry on the fifth floor of Lee Hall. Photo by Suzanne Rossi.

In fall 2019, prior to the pandemic, CCE’s Faculty Director Leslie Martin works with UMW first-years to stock the Eagle Resource Closet, a food pantry on the fifth floor of Lee Hall. Photo by Suzanne Rossi.

Historically, times of devastation have often proven that people, communities and, on a larger spectrum, the world has what it takes to work together for the greater good of humanity. For example, people from all over, domestically and abroad, came together to provide aid to the citizens of Louisiana, Texas, and adjacent regions that were tremendously impacted by the destruction of Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Or, what greater display of “representation matters” is there than the Olympics, where countries set aside differences in order to come together to celebrate one of the world’s greatest competitions. So, as we, in 2021, move deeper into the midst of a global pandemic and social unrest, it is hopeful that we all can agree that “working together” to recover society should be an avid part of our communal and personal action-plans this year. Therefore, let us all ponder the question “What steps can I take today, tomorrow, and in the near future to rebuild hope, stability, and peace within myself, my community, and the world?” And If you have feelings of questioning what impact “U” can have on the world, try to spell unity without it. You matter.

Here are some resources that may inspire you to keep striving to be the change:

https://youtu.be/mIqhl0rH0Wc

https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2020/03/21/how-you-can-help-during-coronavirus/?arc404=true

https://earthjustice.org/blog/2020-april/8-ways-you-can-help-your-community-amid-the-covid-19-crisis

https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/covidwise/

Campus Rec This Week

CAMPUS RECREATION

Spring 2021 Group Fitness ScheduleGroup Fitness Schedule

19 classes Hybrid classes

Monday-Saturday 

Free 30 minute Guided Meditation Zoom Call with Bill Brooks

Mindfulness is great for relieving stress and improving mental health. On these free weekly meditation calls, you won’t be asked to speak, but simply to listen as Bill guides everyone on the line through some mindfulness practice

30 minutes of LIVE guided meditation with Bill Brooks, UMW Yoga & Mindfulness Instructor

Wednesday 12:15-12:45

Zoom link: https://umw-sso.zoom.us/j/81773264881

Meeting ID: 817 7326 4881

 

Bill’s Fac/Staff Lunchtime Yoga Mon & Fri 12-12:50 PM (ZOOM) 

Use your lunch break to relax, stretch, and rejuvenate. This lunchtime yoga class is designed to give faculty and staff headspace during busy workdays, as well as the energy needed to finish the day strong.

Session 1: Feb 8-Mar 12

Session 2: Mar 22-Apr 23

Learn more here.

 

Virtual Movie Night with Outdoor Rec 

Wednesday, February 24th Outdoor Rec is hosting a virtual movie night 🎥 🍿!

FREE SOLO is both an edge-of-your-seat thriller and an inspiring portrait of an athlete who exceeded our current understanding of the human physical and mental potential. The result is a triumph of the human spirit.

The first 20 people registered will receive a “Never Stop Exploring” sticker! Registration link in umwcampusrec Instagram bio

 

Mary Wash Moves

Check your email for this week’s challenge


Running for the Fun of it!Running with Bill

Have you always wanted to run but don’t know how to get started? Join Bill and his new class, “Running for the Fun of it” no matter where you are in your running journey. Whether you’re just starting out or have ran a marathon before, this class is about creating a community of those interested in running. Bill is also a yoga instructor and will be bring in aspects of mindfulness and meditation into the class. Starting Feb 2nd at 4 PM. Meet outside the fitness center. Register through campusrec.umw.edu is free, so it is a great chance to try out this new class format. Again, no prior running experience required!

Kickball

Intramural kickball season begins February 19th through March 7th!

Say ‘Thank You’ To Dining Workers

It's All Thanks to Them graphicThe University Dining management team wants to let all of the dining employees know how much their hard work, dedication, and friendly service are genuinely appreciated by everyone here at UMW. Almost every day we get comments from students or members of the faculty and staff about how much they love and appreciate our workers, and we’re hoping you’ll share those sentiments with them by writing “Thank You” notes, signing display banners, or submitting THX messages online in preparation for our Employee Appreciation Week that begins on March 1st.

Please stop by the Dining Concierge desk on the 2nd floor of the University Center during the week of February 22nd to sign our banner, write messages on postcards, or drop off your own notes of appreciation. There will be a host at the Concierge station between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. and between 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. each day, but you can still drop off a note or sign the banner if the station is unattended. We know that many of you have favorite team members, but we do want all of our staff to get recognized.

Photo Opportunities! We’d love to take photos of you holding up messages of appreciation! You can do that, too, when you stop by the Concierge! We’ll put the photos up on our monitors and on EagleVision during the week of March 1st. During that week all of our staff members (we hope!) will be wearing buttons with their pictures on them (with no mask!), so you can see their great smiles! We invite you to give them lots of great feedback, and let them all know how much you appreciate their service.

We’ve got lots of special “thank you” events planned for them that week, from candy bars, to ice cream treats, to donuts and prize drawings, but your personal words of appreciation mean more to them than any prize we can give them. For more information, contact Rose Benedict, University Dining Marketing Manager, at rbenedic@UMW.edu or 540-654-2169.

UMW Galleries Presents “Rows, Collections and Private Spaces: New Work by Chris Gregson”

Flyer for "Rows, Collections and Private Spaces: New Work by Chris Gregson."UMW Galleries presents “Rows, Collections and Private Spaces: New Work by Chris Gregson,” in the Ridderhof Martin Gallery on the UMW Fredericksburg campus. The show is open through March 21. Please visit www.umwgalleries.org for more information.

Spring Safe Zone Programs

UMW Safe Zone logoThe UMW Safe Zone program offers workshops that are designed to educate members of the University community about lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and queer (LGBTQ+) issues to increase the safety and inclusion of all campus citizens. We are excited to announce the following Spring programs:

  • We will be offering a basic training on Tuesday, March 2nd from 2:00-4:30pm (via Zoom). This training focuses on terminology, issues related to privilege, increasing awareness and sensitivity, and how to support the LGBTQ+ population on campus.
  • We will be offering an advanced training on Friday, March 5th from 1-3:30pm (via Zoom). The advanced training is for faculty and staff who have already completed the basic training and covers more complex topics, including bystander intervention.
  • We are also in the process of planning a book club. This would be a two-part program offered in the late afternoon on Zoom. We would like to judge interest and availability before picking the dates. We will be reading “Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More” by Janet Mock. Safe Zone will provide a free copy of the book to the first 14 people who sign up!
  • We are also in the process of planning an offering of our Identity and Intersectionality. The training covers privilege, power, oppression, prejudice, diversity, cultural competency, intersectionality, and allyship. Ideally, participants will have attended at least one Safe Zone workshop prior to attending this training, but this is not mandatory. We would like to judge interest and availability before picking dates and times for this workshop.

Registration is required to attend each event, and space is limited. If you are interested in registering for the Basic and/or Advanced training, or would like to express interest in the Book Club and/or Identity and Intersectionality Workshop, then please provide your information at http://umw.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_57QYFoE4BvcEGz4.

Alumna Reappointed to UMW Board of Visitors

Princess R. Moss

Princess R. Moss

Princess R. Moss, an education executive and 1983 Mary Washington graduate, has been reappointed to University of Mary Washington’s Board of Visitors. Moss, who previously served on the BOV from 2007 to 2011, is vice president of the National Education Association (NEA), the nation’s largest professional organization, representing three million teachers across the country.

She takes over a four-year BOV term set to expire June 30, 2024, succeeding Sharon Bulova of Fairfax, who has been appointed to Gov. Northam’s new committee on passenger rail.

An advocate for the arts in schools, Moss taught in the classroom for 21 years as an elementary school music teacher, while simultaneously championing children and public education at the local, state and national levels. For nearly four decades, she has supported the NEA’s mission to ensure that students receive well-rounded educations. Read more.

 

Alumnus Holds Court as Black History Month Keynote Speaker

Judge Kerwin A. Miller Sr. ’95, will deliver the virtual keynote address on Feb. 10, for the James Farmer Multicultural Center’s Black History Month celebration.

Judge Kerwin A. Miller Sr. ’95, will deliver the virtual keynote address on Feb. 10, for the James Farmer Multicultural Center’s Black History Month celebration.

Judge Kerwin A. Miller Sr., who graduated from Mary Washington in 1995, delivered the virtual keynote address on Wednesday for the James Farmer Multicultural Center’s Black History Month celebration.

As a young teenager growing up in the Bronx, Miller came across an article about how unlikely it was for an African American male to graduate high school. Taking that news story as both an insult and a challenge, he vowed he’d have a different outcome. At Mary Washington, he excelled both in the classroom as a business administration major and on the court as a member of the Eagles basketball team.

A few years later, Miller found himself in a different kind of court after earning a juris doctorate from Southwestern University School of Law in Los Angeles. He became an attorney with the Legal Aid Bureau in Baltimore, and worked his way through the legal system, serving as a public defender, assistant state’s attorney and eventually an administrative law judge. In 2019, he was sworn in by Governor Larry Hogan as the second African American judge in the history of Harford County, Maryland. Read more.

COVID Delays, But Fails to Deter Fulbright Scholars

2019 alumna Hannah Rothwell is one of several recent UMW graduates going abroad as a Fulbright Scholar this year. The international program recently announced that educational exchanges would continue after being halted last year due to the pandemic.

2019 alumna Hannah Rothwell is one of several recent UMW graduates going abroad as a Fulbright Scholar this year. The international program recently announced that educational exchanges would continue after being halted last year due to the pandemic.

Hannah Rothwell ’19 was recently in the middle of a meeting for her internship at a D.C. think tank when she received a text out of the blue: Call the U.S. Embassy in Uzbekistan immediately.

Rothwell, who majored in economics and international affairs at the University of Mary Washington, was suddenly flooded with memories of being named months earlier as an alternate for a Fulbright award. Knowing she was only a backup and that COVID-19 had suspended all Fulbright endeavors, she had “put it completely out of mind.”

Despite – or, possibly, due to – COVID, Rothwell learned she was needed in Uzbekistan, formerly part of the Soviet Union, as soon as possible to teach English under the auspices of the Fulbright.

Designed to increase mutual understanding between countries, Fulbright is the flagship international educational exchange program sponsored by the U.S. government. Its student exchange program is the largest for American students and young professionals who want to undertake international graduate study, advanced research or teaching English worldwide. More than 2,000 grants are awarded annually in all fields of study for the program, which operates in more than 140 countries. Read more.