December 7, 2022

Farnsworth, Hemphill Publish Opinion Column in ‘Richmond Times-Dispatch’

Professor of Political Science Stephen Farnsworth

Professor of Political Science Stephen Farnsworth

Stephen Farnsworth, professor of Political Science and director of the University’s Center for Leadership and Media Studies, and Emily Hemphill, a UMW senior majoring in political science and minoring in journalism, are coauthors of an opinion column, “Sorry, Virginia, we’re stuck with the Electoral College,” which was published recently in the Richmond Times-Dispatch and the News Virginian.

 

Farnsworth also was featured in other recent news, including:
Gibson: Trump creates dilemma for Va. GOP in 2023 (Roanoke Times)
Stephen Farnsworth, who directs the Center for Leadership and Media Studies at the University of Mary Washington, said Republicans in Virginia may find it tough to retain their House majority next year in these new districts.
Commentary: 2022 midterm highlighted by red-blue shift in the 7th (The Free Lance-Star)
Where the counties of Loudoun and Prince William have gone will Stafford and Spotsylvania soon follow?
Former U.S. President Donald Trump Launches Another Run for Presidency (www.youtube.com)
“Trump, for the moment at least, continues to be banned from Twitter and other social media platforms,” said Stephen Farnsworth.
Joe Biden turns 80 and sets a record in the White House: will he seek re-election at 82?(clarin.com)
“His is an inspiring story, that of the working-class boy who goes to university (the public one in Delaware) and makes his way to the top of the American system,” Stephen J. Farnsworth, PhD in Political Science, told EFE. and professor at the University of Mary Washington.
Opinion/Column: Trump’s Republican romance frays (The Daily Progress)
Stephen Farnsworth, who directs the Center for Leadership and Media Studies at the University of Mary Washington, said Republicans in Virginia may find it tough to retain their House majority next year in these new districts.

Rucker Lands African-American Affairs Post at UVA

UMW Dean Emeritus Cedric Rucker

UMW Associate Vice President and Dean of Student Life Emeritus Cedric Rucker

The following is a message from the Office of Student Affairs:

Dear UMW Campus Community,

I’m writing today to share news and congratulations for Associate Vice President and Dean of Student Life, Emeritus, Cedric Rucker, who has been named Senior Associate Dean in the Office of African-American Affairs at the University of Virginia. His role, expected to span 12-18 months, will surely leave a lasting impact just as it has at the University of Mary Washington.

Cedric spent more than four decades at Mary Washington – as a student, staff member, teacher and confidante. His college journey started in 1977 when he became the first Black male student to live on campus all four years before graduation, and this past summer 2022, we celebrated his retirement and the naming of the Cedric Rucker University Center. He’s recognized widely for his dedication to Mary Washington and the many students and families he’s helped throughout the years, from the first moments of Orientation to the straightening of an academic hood as they walk toward Commencement. His service extends through the Fredericksburg community and the Commonwealth of Virginia.

A Richmond native, Cedric earned a master’s degree from the University of Virginia and served briefly as UVA’s assistant dean of admissions before returning to Mary Washington as an administrator and a larger-than-life campus presence. Now he’s returning in service to his graduate alma mater, pausing plans to pursue the Peace Corps to remain close to his academic homes. More information will be posted to the UVA website soon, but we wanted to share the news first with our UMW community. We wish Cedric all the best in this next endeavor and know that his work in this pivotal moment will benefit all who have the opportunity to interact with him.

Dr. Juliette LandphairVice President for Student Affairs

This email is being sent to you in accordance with the UMW Broadcast Email Policy. Please do not respond directly to this message with comments or questions, but instead to the office or individuals listed above. 

Kelly Comments on Teacher Apprenticeship Program Grant

Pete Kelly is dean of UMW's College of Education. Photo by Suzanne Carr Rossi.

College of Education Dean Pete Kelly

The University of Mary Washington received a $14,200 planning grant from the Virginia Department of Education to work with local school divisions to develop a teacher apprenticeship program.

The VDOE on Monday announced that it awarded a total of $143,000 to nine universities across the state to develop the programs, which would allow school divisions to hire classroom aides, paraprofessionals, long-term substitutes and other unlicensed school employees as teacher apprentices, paving the way for them to become licensed educators.

A year ago, the U.S. Department of Labor approved K–12 teaching as an “apprenticeable” occupation, qualifying teacher apprentice programs for funding through several federal workforce-development grants.

In January, Tennessee became the first state to be approved by the Department of Labor to establish a permanent teacher apprenticeship program. Tennessee’s “Grow Your Own” program is a collaboration between Austin Peay State University and Clarksville-Montgomery County schools.

The program has been successful because it removes the financial burden of enrolling in a traditional teacher education program, making the profession more accessible to low-income and minority adults, said Peter Kelly, dean of UMW’s College of Education.

Apprenticeships can also improve teacher retention, as teachers who are hired out of apprenticeships go into the job “with both eyes open, knowing what they are walking into,” said Kelly.

“They’ve been doing at least some measure of the job already,” he said. “Part of the idea is that teachers are also rooted to place, and so I think people see it as an effective ‘grow your own’ program.”

Kelly said UMW is working with Stafford, Spotsylvania and Fredericksburg public schools to determine the level of need for a local apprenticeship program.

“[The divisions] are primarily focusing on long-term substitutes and paraprofessionals, especially at the elementary level and in special education,” he said. Read more.

Smith Talks Chemistry/Beer on ‘With Good Reason’

Visiting Assistant Professor of Chemistry Sarah Smith '12 instructs biochemistry major Valerie Ebenki in a Jepson Science Center lab. Photo by Suzanne Carr Rossi.

Visiting Assistant Professor of Chemistry Sarah Smith ’12 instructs biochemistry major Valerie Ebenki in a Jepson Science Center lab. Photo by Suzanne Carr Rossi.

Ever tried to drink a bottle of hot sauce? That’s what Ray Parrish of Maltese Brewing Company says his new Signal One beer tastes like. He teamed up with UMW Visiting Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Physics Sarah Smith and her student, Val Ebenki, to attempt to create the world’s spiciest beer. Smith shares the story, topping off a replay of the “Food is Family” episode of With Good Reason radio, which airs through Friday, Dec. 2. Listen to the episode.

Bocaz-Leiva Shares Expertise With ‘News Explorer’

Assistant Professor of Spanish Maria Laura Bocaz-Leiva

Associate Professor of Spanish Maria Laura Bocaz-Leiva

Associate Professor of Spanish Maria Laura Bocaz-Leiva contributed to an article titled “José Donoso, Coronation and a novel in the line of maximum danger” in News Explorer. Coronación responded to a rather particular context, as explained to Culto by Bocaz-Leiva, a specialist in the work of the author of El lugar sin límites. Read more.

Larus Offers Insight on a China+1 Business Strategy

Professor Emerita of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Freund Larus

Professor Emerita of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Freund Larus

Elizabeth Freund Larus, Professor Emerita of Political Science and International Affairs, claimed in a WION India documentary that Vietnam, the Philippines and India are in a strong position to benefit from a China+1 diversification strategy, and that India’s future as an alternative to China lies in being a hub for next generation technologies. This and more throughout the program.

Larus also spoke with CNBC for a segment titled “Taiwan polls: The pendulum swings back and forth as it does in other democracies, consultancy says.” Larus discusses the Nov. 27 Taiwan local elections. Watch the segment.

Singh Pens Essay for Magazine’s Inaugural Issue

Department of Political Science and International Affairs Associate Professor Ranjit Singh

Department of Political Science and International Affairs Associate Professor Ranjit Singh

Associate Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Ranjit Singh’s essay “Enter the Coyote” appeared in the inaugural issue of the online Pie and Chai Magazine, which focuses on local issues that resonate elsewhere. The essay considers the impact of coyotes on Potomac Creek, where Dr. Singh was raised. Dr. Singh teaches a seminar on politics and the environment, and researches and writes on local environmental issues from time to time.  Read the essay.

Foss Presents at The Victorians Institute’s Golden Jubilee Conference

Foss’s Conference Badge

Professor of English Chris Foss presented a paper entitled “‘We are the zanies of sorrow’: Oscar Wilde’s Post-Prison Relationship to Disability” on Saturday, Oct. 15, at The Victorians Institute’s Golden Jubilee Conference in Spartanburg, South Carolina.  In conjunction with the conference theme, Anniversaries and Auguries, Foss’s paper marked the 125th anniversary of Oscar Wilde’s release from Reading Gaol upon serving a two-year sentence for crimes of “gross indecency” by exploring Wilde’s relationship to disability in the few years remaining to him.  Most paint this period as merely the pathetic pageant of a broken man of sorrows, well acquainted with grief.  What often becomes lost in such a narrative, though, is the extent to which the physical debilitation and psychological distress he endured in prison moved him to reciprocal pity and responsive action in the name of those who have experienced similar difficulties.  Instead of simply wallowing in his own suffering, Wilde demanded justice for vulnerable bodies/minds that places like Reading rendered at risk. Indeed, in all three of the only texts he published after his incarceration (two published letters to the Daily Chronicle on prison reform and in his powerful poem The Ballad of Reading Gaol), Wilde shows himself to be a voice who calls to us from out of the depths of self-reflection to learn with him important lessons about love and kindness, justice and equality.

Kim’s Paper Published in New Park Dae Sung Book

Assistant Professor of Art History Suzie Kim

Assistant Professor of Art History Suzie Kim

Assistant Professor of Art History Suzie Kim received $25,000 from Korea Foundation this year and presented a paper on “Visualizing the Ideal Relationship between Animals and Humans: Zoomorphic and Anthropomorphic Images” at Korea Institute, Harvard University, on Oct. 28, 2022. See details on the symposium.

Kim’s paper is included in the book, Park Dae Sung: Ink Reimaginedpublished last week, and she will curate the Park Dae Sung: Ink Reimagined exhibition at UMW Galleries in fall 2023. The traveling exhibit, featured in a recent Forbes article, opened at Korea Institute, Harvard University and the Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth College this fall.

Hansen-Glucklich Delivers Keynote at University of Utah

Associate Professor of German Jennifer Hansen-Glucklich

Associate Professor of German Jennifer Hansen-Glucklich

Associate Professor of German Jennifer Hansen-Glucklich gave a keynote address on antisemitism at the University of Utah on Monday, November 7th. The address was part of the university’s annual “U-Remembers the Holocaust” week (organized by the Center for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion).  The theme this year was “Erasure of History.” Read more.