April 4, 2020

Johnson-Young Publishes Manuscript on Firearms Safety

Assistant Professor Elizabeth Johnson-Young

Elizabeth Johnson-Young, Assistant Professor of Communication, recently had her co-authored manuscript “Understanding Pediatric Residents’ Communication Decisions Regarding Anticipatory Guidance About Firearms” published in Journal of Health Communication. It is now available on their website and will appear in the next print version. The study was co-authored with emergency pediatricians and investigates decisions of pediatricians to counsel on firearm safety during well-child visits, as recommended by organizations, such as the AAP. Using concepts from the Theory of Planned Behavior and the Health Belief Model, ordinary least squares regression testing and a path analysis demonstrated the impact of several variables on the prioritization of firearm counseling, including pediatrician sex, perceptions of parental viewpoints on, self-efficacy, perceptions of training, and comfort discussing firearms. Future plans include further study, as well as training material for residential programs. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10810730.2020.1745961.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s latest column deals with the ‘new normal’ of staying home. Read LIVING AND WORKING IN A NEW, VIRTUAL REALITY.

 

While watching television one night, I saw a commercial for home grocery delivery.

“Soon, we won’t have to leave our house for any reason,” I said to my husband.

We can get our entertainment at home, and professional development and education through our computers. While going to the gym is nice, some of us have home gyms or use videos or online exercise classes. I can download books through free services from my public library or have a subscription service provide me with everything I want to read. Our news is delivered online. I can use TeleMed for many medical needs.

Then there’s food delivery. In addition to the tried-and-true pizza delivery options, we now have companies like GrubHub and DoorDash. Retailers allow you to order online and have products delivered to your door. Need some clothing? It’s just a click away. You can stay home and enjoy your worship service online or on television, too. Some organizations have allowed employees to telework, at least occasionally, for years. And now you can get your groceries delivered? Why would I ever need to leave home?

Fast forward a couple of months, and we are living this reality. I certainly never expected to have to stay home, but we’re doing it. Read more.

Larus Comments on Presidents Suspending Constitutional Rights During Crises

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Larus

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Larus

Elizabeth Larus, professor of political science and international affairs, contributed to an article entitled, “Can President Trump suspend constitutional rights of Americans due to the coronavirus crisis? Experts say unlikely,” on MEAWW.com.

“There has been talk of suspending the Constitution during times of crisis, such as President Abraham Lincoln’s suspension of habeas corpus and Franklin D. Roosevelt’s extraordinary wartime powers, such as the internment of Americans of Japanese descent,” Elizabeth Freund Larus, Professor of Department of Political Science, University of Mary Washington told MEA WorldWide (MEAWW).

“Americans have (sometimes grudgingly, sometimes willingly) acquiesced to enhanced executive power during times of national crisis, with the understanding that things ‘get back to normal’ once the crisis has passed. This, in fact, happened during WWII. However, that was when Americans had faith in our government. Americans no longer have that level of trust in the federal government,” she said. Read more.

Baker Interviewed about Center for Economic Development in The Free Lance-Star

As head of UMW's Small Business Development Center, Brian Baker helps entrepreneurs bring their businesses to fruition and contributes to the economic wellbeing of the Fredericksburg region. Photo by Suzanne Carr Rossi.

As head of UMW’s Small Business Development Center, Brian Baker helps entrepreneurs bring their businesses to fruition and contributes to the economic wellbeing of the Fredericksburg region. Photo by Suzanne Carr Rossi.

Brian Baker, executive director of UMW’s Center for Economic Development and Small Business Development Center, was interviewed for an article in The Free Lance-Star on how he and his team are helping local businesses navigate the pandemic.

The University of Mary Washington Center for Economic Development has taken the pulse of area businesses suffering from the impact of COVID-19 and pivoted to provide help.

It’s creating free, 30-minute online classes and brief podcasts on topics that are causing owners the most pain at a time when many are having to shut their doors, and providing consultation online in keeping with new social distancing requirements.

“We haven’t had this kind of challenge since [Hurricane] Isabel, and all the processes have changed,” said Brian Baker, the center’s executive director for economic development.

He said his office, which includes the UMW Small Business Center, has been getting four times as many calls as normal. He and his staff decided to survey businesses in Planning Districts 16, 17 and 18 to see how prepared they were and what problems they were facing. Read more.

 

 

Benedict Interviewed in Forbes about Feeding On-Campus Students During a Pandemic

UMW Dining Marketing Coordinator Rose Benedict was recently interviewed by Forbes in an article entitled, “Will Coronavirus Improve Customer Service?” Benedict spoke about the ways UMW Dining is accommodating self-quarantined students, as well as those not in quarantine, living on campus during the pandemic:

 For example, the University of Mary Washington’s dining service has completely rethought the way it feeds students. The dining team now delivers food directly to self-quarantined students in the dorms. “We’re still on the line at lunch time and dinner time to serve the students who are still residing on campus, and who are not self-quarantined,” says Rose Benedict, a unit marketing coordinator at the University of Mary Washington Dining Services. “But since we are following the social distancing protocols, students are not permitted to eat in our dining room and must get all of their meals to go.” Read more.

Broome’s Online Learning Collective in The Chronicle of Higher Education

College of Education Associate Professor John Broome. Photo by Norm Shafer.

College of Education Associate Professor John Broome. Photo by Norm Shafer.

College of Education Associate Professor John Broome was mentioned in a Chronicle of Higher Education article entitled, “How to Help Struggling Students Succeed Online.” Broome recently launched the Online Learning Collective, a Facebook group – which has since added a website and YouTube channel – to help faculty worldwide with high- and low-tech tools and resources, support and encouragement as they learn to teach remotely.

John Broome, an associate professor of education at the University of Mary Washington, started a Facebook group, the Online Learning Collective, to support the transition to remote teaching. It already has more than 20,000 members.

Read more.

UMW Administration, Faculty & Staff Featured in FLS Article on Remote Work

Members of the UMW community, including Associate Provost for Institutional Analysis and Effectiveness Debra Schleef, Executive Director of Human Resources Beth Williams, Associate Payroll Manager Leslie Petrey and Provost Nina Mikhalevsky were interviewed for a recent article in The Free Lance-Star: “Outbreak sends many Fredericksburg area residents home to work.”

Debra Schleef, associate provost of Institutional Analysis and Effectiveness

Debra Schleef, associate provost of Institutional Analysis and Effectiveness

Debra Schleef, a sociology professor at the University of Mary Washington, learned early on that the coronavirus would soon enough require staff and faculty to remotely work and teach from home.

It prompted Schleef, who also works in the provost’s office, to pull together a collection of paper and electronic files she’d need to work from home with the other three folks in the office.

She was a bit ahead of the game, already having a laptop that uses an internet connection so that makes it “not too different from sitting in front of my computer at work.” Read more.

Bylenok’s ‘With Good Reason’ Episode Rebroadcast Starting on March 27

Assistant Professor of English and Creative Writing Laura Bylenok

Assistant Professor of English and Creative Writing Laura Bylenok

Assistant Professor of English and Creative Writing Laura Bylenok will be featured in a rebroadcast of With Good Reason on public radio stations across the country.  An award-winning poet who stitches together her love of science with her passion for the written word, Bylenok read from her recent collection on WGR’s Poetry That Heals last spring. The rebroadcast will air starting Friday, March 27.

“In college, [Bylenok] was fascinated with genetic engineering. Now, she manipulates language, not DNA,” says the show’s description. “Her recent book turns familiar forms into poetic laboratory experiments.”

Sharing selections from her book Warp, winner of the 2015 T.S. Eliot Prize, Bylenok describes her fascination with molecular biology and genetics, explaining her use of the words and concepts they conjure to put the human condition into prose. An inspiration for her poem Genome, she tells WGR host Sarah McConnell, before reading the piece on air, is a haunting image left by a past professor, an endocrinologist who sewed together pairs of living rats.

With Good Reason airs Sundays at 2 p.m. in Fredericksburg on Radio IQ 88.3 Digital. A complete list of broadcast times and audio files of the full programs (posted the week of the show) can be found online at www.withgoodreasonradio.org. Produced by Virginia Humanities for the Virginia Higher Education Broadcasting Consortium, With Good Reason airs on 100 stations in 33 states.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses the importance of body language. Read NONVERBAL SIGNALS SPEAK VOLUMES.

 

Did you know research shows that your body language, or nonverbal messaging, speaks louder to people than the words you say?

Some believe 55 percent of communication is nonverbal. Within that remaining 45 percent, only 7 percent of communication is attributed to the words. The remaining 38 percent comes from tone, pitch, loudness and other attributes related to how the words are said.

Here’s an illustration I use in my professional selling class, one that everyone can relate to. Read more.

Farnsworth Comments in the Regional and National News

Stephen Farnsworth, professor of political science and director of the University’s Center for Leadership and Media Studies

Stephen Farnsworth, professor of political science and director of the University’s Center for Leadership and Media Studies

Stephen Farnsworth, professor of political science and director of the University’s Center for Leadership and Media Studies, has been quoted in several regional and national news stories:

Grading the region’s coronavirus response: Hogan 1st, Northam last, and Bowser in the middle (The Washington Post)

National Media Discover Gov. Hogan: ’The Republican Who Gets It’ (Maryland Matters)

Viewpoints with Todd van der Hey (CJAD Montreal)

Virginia Judge Loosens Ballot Signature Rules Amid Pandemic (Courthouse News Service)