December 8, 2019

Cooperman Discusses Women’s Republican PAC Involvement in Primary Race

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman was interviewed for an article in the Sunflower State Journal on a Women’s Republican PAC’s decision to get involved in a primary race between two female GOP candidates.

“It’s highly significant,” said Cooperman. “What is unusual about this move is that it came so early and it came in a race with other Republican women. That to me is the most noteworthy thing.” Read more. 

Grothe’s Co-authored Study Results Published in Scientific Journals

Assistant Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences Pamela Grothe

Assistant Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences Pamela Grothe

Assistant Professor of Earth and Environmental Science Pamela Grothe has had the results of a study she co-authored published in several scientific journals and websites, as well as Forbes. According to the study, originally published in Geophysical Research Letters, El Niño swings have intensified to 25% stronger in the Industrial Age. Grothe performed the study under Kim Cobb, principal investigator and professor in Georgia Institute of Technology’s School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. As the study’s first author, Grothe compared temperature-dependent chemical deposits on coral that was recently extracted to that of older coral records showing relevant sea surface temperatures from the past 7,000 years. Then, with the assistance of Georgia Tech collaborators and other partner research institutions, she identified patterns in the El Niño Southern Oscillation, swings of heating and cooling equatorial Pacific waters that cause El Niños and La Niñas to form every few years.

New and Strange Climate Pattern Includes More Violent El Nino Swings (SciTechDaily)

Pacific Ocean temperature swings violently in industrial age: Study (The Tribune, India; Daily Excelsior)

El Nino seeing extreme swings in the industrial age (Space Daily)

Has El Nino Become More Intense In The Industrial Age? (Forbes)

 

Larus Comments on Hong Kong Protests and Taiwan Election

Elizabeth Freund Larus, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs

Elizabeth Freund Larus, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Freund Larus spoke to the South China Morning Post in an article on how the Hong Kong protests are impacting the Taiwanese elections. Larus said “that in most polls Tsai had a significant lead over Han, bolstered by young voters who supported the Hong Kong protesters. ‘The Tsai camp clearly has momentum, while Han appears to be stuck looking for the right message, which is much too late in the campaign cycle,’ she said.” Read more.

 

Lee Presents at the Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association

Janie Lee, Associate Professor of Linguistics.

Janie Lee, Associate Professor of Linguistics

Janie Lee, Associate Professor of Linguistics, presented her research at the 2019 meeting of the American Anthropological Association and the Canadian Anthropology Society in Vancouver. Her paper was “Migrants as Language Experts and Subtitles as Listening Subject in South Korean Television” and was part of the panel “Redefining the Language Professional: Shifting Duties and Changing Institutional Climates.” The paper investigated the way Korean ethnonationalism was enabled in entertainment media through the use of unconventional subtitling practices for migrant speech.

Hamon Contributes to Government Simulation on Future of Southeast Asia

Adjunct Instructor David Hamon

David Hamon, Adjunct Instructor in the Political Science & International Affairs Department, was a major contributor to a high-level U.S. Government simulation held in Washington D.C. in mid-November on the future political, social, and resiliency of the Southeast Asia region. The simulation focused around the Mekong river and the many actors/organizations involved in the viability of ecosystem.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star tackles how to navigate boss-employee workplace friendships. Read FRIENDLY, NOT FRIENDS.

 

YOU’RE THE BOSS in your organization. How do you interact with your employees? Are you friends with your staff or just friendly?

How did you become the boss? In many organizations, people are promoted from within—which generally is a good thing. Sometimes the boss is hired from outside the organization, which can be a good practice too, depending on the needs of the organization.

It doesn’t matter how you step into the supervisor role. When you do, you’re entering a new universe with a different set of rules. Read more.

Farnsworth Presents Research at National Communication Conference

Stephen Farnsworth, professor of political science and director of the University’s Center for Leadership and Media Studies

Stephen Farnsworth, professor of political science and director of the University’s Center for Leadership and Media Studies

Stephen Farnsworth, professor of political science and director of the University’s Center for Leadership and Media Studies, recently presented a research paper, “Studying the Presidency after 9/11: Re-considering Presidential Character in Domestic and International Contexts,” at the National Communication Association conference in Baltimore, Maryland. The paper is also a chapter in a new book: 9/11 and the Academy: Responses in the Liberal Arts and the 21st Century World. The book is edited by Mark Finney, a 1999 graduate of Mary Washington, and Matthew Shannon and was just published by Palgrave Macmillan. Dr. Finney, who is now an associate professor of Mass Communications at Emory and Henry College, Emory, Virginia, was one of Dr. Farnsworth’s first political science students at Mary Washington two decades ago.

Dr. Farnsworth has also been quoted in several regional and national news stories:

Locking It Down (Style Weekly)

Trump Urged to Take Part in Impeachment Inquiry (CTV News Channel)

Some Local Governments in Rural Virginia Declare 2nd Amendment Sanctuary (WVTF)

Virginia Senators Hope to Pass Legislation That Would Fix Virginia Beach Tragedy Fund (WVTF)

Senator Warner: Let Users Freely Move Their Data From One Social Media Platform to Another (WVTF)

Could Driver’s Licenses for Undocumented Immigrants Split Democrats in January? (WVTF)

Virginia Democrats Set Sights on Equal Rights Amendment (Courthouse News Service)

Mark Herring backs recreational marijuana in Virginia (Daily Stock Dish)

Farnsworth 2018 book, “Presidential Communication and Character: White House News Management from Clinton and Cable to Twitter and Trump,” was recommended in an article on The Free Lance-Star on local authors:

Looking for holiday gifts? Consider books by Fredericksburg area authors (The Free Lance-Star)

Goldman Presents on Images of Young Black Females in Reality Programming at National Communication Association Conference

Assistant Professor of Communication Adria Goldman

Last Friday, November 15, Adria Goldman, Assistant Professor of Communication, presented at the National Communication Association’s 105th Annual Convention in Baltimore, MD as part of the session “Beyond the Journal: Discussions of Media Narratives about Youth and Race and a Call for Media Literacy.” Her presentation, titled “From Cartoons to Reality Television: Examining Images of Young Black Females in Reality Programming,” was a review of her analysis of two competition reality shows with child/adolescent casts–Bravo’s Top Chef Jr. and Lifetime’s The Rap Game. In her dissertation research, she found that representations of Black women in reality television were more flattering when the cast was predominately Black. The goal of the current study was to (1) identify how young Black females are presented in reality television programming and the implications of such, (2) identify similarities and differences between the two competition shows, noting the different racial background of each show, and (3) use the findings to recommend media literacy practices and activities or young audiences. It was a great session, and she reports that it was also exciting presenting alongside fellow UMW Assistant Professor of Communication Emily Deering Crosby and with Elizabeth Johnson-Young, also a UMW Assistant Professor of Communication, as their chair.

Crosby Presents Two Papers at National Communication Association Conference

Assistant Professor of Communication Emily Deering Crosby

Emily Deering Crosby, Assistant Professor of Communication, presented her research last Thursday and Friday at the National Communication Association Conference in Baltimore, MD. The title of her research presentation in the Feminist and Women’s Studies Division was “‘She went too far’: Exploring Patriarchal Critiques of Feminist Comedians Michelle Wolf and Samantha Bee,” which discussed patriarchal themes of manufactured catfights, double standards, and protection in critiques of feminist comedy. Crosby’s second presentation was titled “Framing Racial Innocence: Media Literacy and the Cases of Brock Turner and Owen Labrie” in the African American Communication and Culture Division, which used visual rhetoric scholarship to analyze news media bias and call for media literacy in communication and digital studies curriculum. Her second presentation was alongside leading panelist and fellow UMW faculty member Adria Goldman, Assistant Professor of Communication. Their well-attended panel was expertly chaired by fellow UMW faculty member Elizabeth Johnson-Young, Assistant Professor of Communication.

Levy Publishes Story, Presents Excerpt from Novel in Progress

Assistant Professor of English Rachel Levy

Rachel Levy, Assistant Professor of English, recently presented an excerpt from a novel in progress at The Bitter Laugh, a featured event at the 2019 Lambda Lit Fest in Los Angeles, CA. The Bitter Laugh showcased queer/trans writers of dark comedy, including Ryka Aoki, Charlie Jane Anders, and Megan Milks. In addition, Levy’s short story “Severin,” a satire of Venus in Furs scholarship, is published in the current issue of The Account. And today, alongside co-editor Lily Duffy, Levy launched Issue Eighteen of Dreginald Magazine.