October 1, 2020

Poska Earns Grant from the Social Science Research Council

Professor of History Allyson Poska

Professor of History Allyson Poska

Professor of History Allyson Poska earned a COVID-19 Rapid-Response Grant from the Social Science Research Council, in partnership with the Henry Luce Foundation and with the support of the Wenner-Gren, Ford, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur, and William and Flora Hewlett Foundations. These highly competitive grants went to 62 recipients – out of 1,300 internationally who applied – for projects from across the social sciences and related fields that address the social, economic, cultural, psychological, and political impact of COVID-19 in the United States and globally, as well as responses to the pandemic’s wide-ranging effects. Dr. Poska’s paper was entitled, “Convincing the Masses: Global Public Health and Smallpox Vaccination in the Spanish Empire (1803-1810).” The grant money will mainly be used by Dr. Poska to acquire archival material in Peru, where she had planned to conduct research if the pandemic had not hit.

The abstract reads:

In 1803 Charles IV of Spain initiated a campaign against smallpox, opening vaccination rooms across the peninsula and sending the cowpox vaccine around the globe with the Royal Philanthropic Expedition. This global examination of Spain’s smallpox vaccination campaign analyzes the dynamic between the purveyors of the vaccine and the potential recipients. On both the peninsula and around the globe, the vaccination campaign engaged the diverse populations of the Spanish empire: men and women, rich and poor, Africans (both free and enslaved), Indigenous Americans, Filipinos, mixed-race peoples, and whites (both Spanish and American born). The campaign challenged deeply rooted race and gender hierarchies and asserted new claims to governmental authority. I intend to examine how each of these groups asserted their own expectations about bodily authority and governmental control as they accepted or rejected the vaccine. I have already conducted archival research in Spain and Mexico, but my plans to conduct research in Peru this summer were halted by Covid-19.  This project relates directly to the current Covid-19 as public health authorities grapple with the challenge of encouraging hundreds of millions of people of all races, classes, and cultures to submit to a novel vaccine for a novel virus. This research will result in a series of peer-reviewed articles and a book manuscript.

Williams Discusses Dr. James Farmer’s Legacy on PBS’s American Portrait

UMW James Farmer Multicultural Center Assistant Director Chris Williams. Photo by Karen Pearlman.

UMW James Farmer Multicultural Center Assistant Director Chris Williams. Photo by Karen Pearlman.

Assistant Director of the James Farmer Multicultural Center Chris Williams was featured on PBS’s American Portrait: A National Storytelling Project. He discussed the legacy of civil rights icon and late Mary Washington history professor Dr. James L. Farmer Jr., and how JFMC helps students today make connections between civil rights, social justice and anti-racism movements of the past and the present. Watch here.

Cooperman Interviewed on WAMU About Early Voting in 2020 Elections

Rosalyn Cooperman, Professor of Political Science, appeared on WAMU’s Morning Edition to discuss early voting in Virginia ahead of the 2020 presidential and congressional elections.

Early Voting In Virginia Kicks Off With Long Lines Around The Polls

Larus Comments on Tik Tok on CBN News

Professor and Chairman of the Department of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Freund Larus

Professor and Chairman of the Department of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Freund Larus

Elizabeth Freund Larus, Chairman of the Department of Political Science and International Affairs, commented on CBN News on U.S. bans of popular Chinese apps TikTok and WeChat. In her September 18 interview, Professor Larus warned that TikTok, a Chinese video-sharing social networking service, feeds the facial recognition and user data that it collects to China. WeChat is a Chinese messaging app. Its messages are not encrypted, which allows the Chinese government to read messages.

View the interview at
https://www1.cbn.com/cbnnews/us/2020/september/us-banning-wechat-tiktok-citing-national-security

Lee Publishes Research Article in Applied Mathematics and Computation

Professor of Mathematics Leo Lee

Professor of Mathematics Leo Lee

Professor of Mathematics Leo Lee saw the recent publication of his paper “A Domain Decomposition Algorithm for Optimal Control Problems Governed by Elliptic PDEs with Random Inputs” in the Journal of the Applied Mathematics and Computation.

Barry Quoted in Daily Beast Article

Associate Professor of Religious Studies Jennifer Barry

Associate Professor of Religious Studies Jennifer Barry

Jennifer Barry, Associate Professor of Religious Studies, was recently interviewed and quoted on the online news and opinion site the Daily Beast. The article, titled, “Falwell’s ‘Blame the Woman’ Strategy Goes All the Way Back to Eden” was written by Candida Moss (the Edward Cadbury Professor of Theology at the University of Birmingham, UK).

The article, written for a public audience, draws attention to the recent scandal of the former President of Liberty University, Jerry Falwell, regarding his recent sexual exploitations. Upon discovery of these allegations, he was subsequently removed from his very influential position. Moss was quick to note that Falwell’s deflection and shift to blame his wife was not an unusual tactic and quotes Barry to highlight the long Christian tradition of emphasizing the corrupting behavior of women that ultimately bring down powerful, and seemingly innocent, men.

Barry frequently teaches rhetorical strategies that target public and powerful women in Christian history. She was sought out by Dr. Moss for her expertise and interest in the study of gender, sexuality, and religion. And much of the material quoted stems from her most recent research project on gender-based violence in late ancient Christian texts.

Farnsworth Lectures on 2020 Elections

Stephen Farnsworth, professor of political science and director of the University’s Center for Leadership and Media Studies

Stephen Farnsworth, professor of political science and director of the University’s Center for Leadership and Media Studies

Stephen Farnsworth, professor of political science and director of the University’s Center for Leadership and Media Studies, recently delivered an online lecture, “The Exceptional Election Year of 2020: Anger, Protest, Economic Anxiety and Covid-19,” for Virginia Revenue Commissioners Conference.

Dr. Farnsworth also has commented on the following national or regional news stories:

Early voting turnout hits record numbers in Virginia (Fox5DC)

Virginia early voting nears 200,000 in first week (WTVR; The Free Lance-Star; WHSV)

164,000 cast ballots in first week of early voting in Virginia (Daily Progress)

Polls show Virginia voters favor Biden (Galax Gazette)

Poll of Virginia Voters Favors Biden and Warner; Shows Mixed Support for Mail-In Voting (RVA Magazine)

Virginia sees massive early voting lines ahead of general election (New York Post)

Virginians to Decide Fate of Controversial Redistricting Amendment (Courthouse News Services)

Viewpoints with Todd van der Heyden (CJAD)

Post-debate Review (CP24)

Debate Showdown (CTV News Channel)

Trump to Fill Supreme Court Vacancy (CTV News Channel)

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Dies at 87 (CTV News Channel)

Expert tells ABC7 rapidly replacing RBG before the election would be ‘unprecedented’ (WJLA)

Wittman, Rashid spar on Social Security, climate change, COVID-19 response in 2nd debate (Prince William Times)

Wittman, Rashid exchange barbs in Monday night debate (The Free Lance-Star)

The United Nations turns 75 (VOA News)

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s latest column in The Free Lance-Star is titled, “CARE ENOUGH TO COACH.”

 

I once had a colleague who provided me with opportunities to be a coach. As a manager, he had a good heart and gave me every indication that he wanted to be a good manager. But there were many times he did things that ultimately gave me the opportunity to care enough about him to correct his behavior.

Did you catch that? I cared enough about him to have tough conversations with him. Eventually, he said that to me. He shared that he had told his wife about one of our recent conversations, and his wife remarked, “She must care a lot about you to keep sharing ways that you can get better.”

Have you either thought about corrective actions as caring? Most of us do not. Read more.

 

Larus Comments on U.S.-China Tech Cold War in South China Morning Post

Professor and Chairman of the Department of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Freund Larus

Professor and Chairman of the Department of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Freund Larus

Elizabeth Freund Larus, Chairman of the Department of Political Science and International Affairs, commented in the South China Morning Post (HK) on September 16 that regardless of a Trump or Biden victory in November, the U.S. will continue and possibly deepen scrutiny of Chinese acquisitions of technology. She also indicated that a second Trump administration is likely to further limit sales of advanced technology to China on national security grounds, and that there may be greater scrutiny of Chinese graduate students engaged in technology research in the U.S. Her comments also ran in the The Korea Times.

Read the article at
https://www.scmp.com/tech/big-tech/article/3101636/us-china-tech-cold-war-has-turned-hot-would-biden-presidency-change

Larus Comments on U.S. Sanctions Against China in Indus News

Professor and Chairman of the Department of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Freund Larus

Professor and Chairman of the Department of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Freund Larus

Elizabeth Freund Larus, Chairman of the Department of Political Science and International Affairs, commented on Indus News on U.S. sanctions against Chinese construction companies. In her August 31 interview, Professor Larus argued that the U.S. sanctions are not intended to contain China’s rise, but are in response to their participation in China’s island building on disputed territories in the South China Sea. The U.S. sanctions threaten the future of Chinese development projects, such as construction of Sri Lanka’s Port City Columbo project. Professor Larus’ comments begin at 19:30 minutes into the program at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CQ1mCRNkptw