July 13, 2020

Larus Comments on Taiwan Recall Vote, U.S.-China Relations

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Freund Larus

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Freund Larus

Elizabeth Freund Larus, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, commented on Taiwan and U.S. politics on Squawk Box Asia, CNBC Asia, on June 9, 2020. Overblown promises, an ambitious presidential bid, efforts to move Taiwan closer to China, and the HK protests all contributed to the historic recall of Han Kuo-yu, mayor of Kaohsiung, Taiwan’s critical industrial city. Regarding the 2020 U.S. presidential election, Larus claimed that a Democratic administration may not be much kinder to China than the Trump administration.

View part of the interview at  athttps://www.cnbc.com/video/2020/06/09/china-should-not-expect-an-easier-relationship-with-biden-professor.html

Rotter, Hansen-Glucklich Pen FLS Letter to the Editor on Protest Cartoon

Assistant Professor of German Jennifer Hansen-Glucklich

Assistant Professor of German Jennifer Hansen-Glucklich

Associate Professor of German Marcel Rotter

Associate Professor of German Marcel Rotter

Associate German Professor Marcel Rotter and Assistant German Professor Jennifer Hansen-Glucklich penned a Letter to the Editor of The Free Lance-Star on an editorial cartoon that compared anti-racist protests to the infamous German pogroms known as “Kristallnacht”—or “Night of Broken Glass.” Read more.

 

Protests cannot be compared to Kristallnacht

It was with great dismay that we saw the June 3 editorial cartoon in The Free Lance–Star, a comparison of the infamous pogrom of Nov. 9, 1938, in Germany (often referred to as “Kristallnacht”—or “Night of Broken Glass”) with the anti-racist street protests of June 2020.

By its very definition, an editorial cartoon sheds light on a societal issue poignantly, quickly, and without the need for a long explanation. We were struggling to find an interpretation that would not be racist.

Do you really believe that protesters and looters are the same group of people?

This cartoon betrays at best an ignorance of history, and at worst a total lack of compassion for the plight of victims of racism in this country.

Marcel P. Rotter
Associate Professor of German

Jennifer Hansen–Glucklich
Assistant Professor of German

University of Mary Washington

Rycroft Discusses How Virus-Linked Recession Affects Women, Minorities

Professor of Economics Robert Rycroft

Professor of Economics Robert Rycroft

Professor of Economics Robert Rycroft recently discussed with Courthouse News the effect the recession, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, has had on women and minorities.

Pew reported Thursday that women, particularly Hispanic women, fared much worse in the coronavirus recession than during the Great Recession of 2007-09. Conversely, African-American men, who saw a peak unemployment of 21.2% during the Great Recession, have seen only a 15.8% top unemployment rate this time around. 

“The disparities have a lot to do with the different mix of occupations,” said Robert Rycroft, an economics professor at the University of Mary Washington. Rycroft noted that in previous recessions manufacturing and construction suffered more than the service sector. “Some jobs were very susceptible to the effects of the virus,” Rycroft said. Read more.

Stommel Interviewed by the Chronicle of Higher Education

Jesse Stommel, Senior Lecturer of Digital Learning

Jesse Stommel, Senior Lecturer of Digital Learning

Jesse Stommel, a senior lecturer of Digital Studies, was recently interviewed by the Chronicle of Higher Education for an article entitled, “How Your Syllabus Can Cater to Every Student.”

Imagine, for instance, an online course in which some students crave real-time interaction, and others are unable to participate. As Jesse Stommel, a senior lecturer and digital-learning fellow at the University of Mary Washington, in Virginia, said when I was working on our recent report on preparing for an online fall, a professor could give students the option of attending a discussion in Zoom — or writing a reflection, or posting to a discussion board. In addition to providing access, Stommel said, such choices can lead to better discussions since students get to pick a format that appeals to them. Read more.

Farnsworth Comments in the Regional and National News

Stephen Farnsworth, Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for Leadership and Media Studies.

Stephen Farnsworth, Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for Leadership and Media Studies.

Stephen Farnsworth, professor of political science and director of the University’s Center for Leadership and Media Studies, has been quoted in several regional and national news stories:

G.O.P. Congressman Faces Primary After Officiating Same-Sex Wedding (The New York Times)

Rep. Riggleman ousted in Virginia GOP convention after presiding over same-sex marriage (The Hour; The Washington Post)

Republican congressman’s gay wedding role draws challenge at parking lot convention (Reuters)

Biden wants the media to cover more of his events, and Trump does too (CNY Central; mycbs4.com; abc6onyourside.com)

New Charges Against Police in Floyd Case (CTV News Channel)

Trump Eyes Executive Order on Policing (CTV News Channel)

U.S. Racial and Political Divisions (CTV News Channel)

Trump Changes Rally from ‘Juneteenth’ (CTV News Channel)

Virginia Governor Orders Removal of Confederate Statue Amid Protests (Courthouse News Service)

Rep. Harris’ Loyalty to Trump Appears Unbreakable (Maryland Matters.org)

Democratic candidates label Good, who defeated Riggleman, ‘extremist’ (Nelson County Times)

Mornings on the Mall (WMAL)

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses the importance of reaching out to Black employees and colleagues in the wake of George Floyd’s death. Read MANAGEMENT MATTERS: DON’T BE SILENT.

George Floyd’s senseless death on Memorial Day has caused many people of all races to find their voices. Protests are happening around the United States in communities of all sizes. While most of these happen at nights and on weekends, they impact normal work days, as well, as we work with people who are distracted and may be emotionally and perhaps physically empty.

While colleagues of all backgrounds are impacted, as a manager have you reached out to your black colleagues to see how they are doing? They are certainly the center of attention right now. Do you recognize how your black colleagues are being treated on a daily basis? Are you intentionally holding conversations about racial biases in the workplace with your coworkers?

What are your African American colleagues feeling right now? Do you know? Have you asked? If so, good for you! Only by asking will most people share. And if you haven’t asked, why haven’t you? Do you ascribe to the mindset of “if I don’t acknowledge it, it’s not happening?” The frustration and weariness among our black colleagues is real. If you don’t know that, it’s because you just aren’t paying attention. As a manager and leader, your job is to serve and support each of your subordinates, not just the ones who share your same ethnicity. Read more.

 

Lamphere Offers Insight for Viral Turtle Photo

Assistant Biology Professor Brad Lamphere

Assistant Biology Professor Brad Lamphere

Assistant Professor of Biology Brad Lamphere, an expert on the ecology and evolution of freshwater fishes, offered up his insight on turtles to The Free Lance-Star after a photo of three turtles stacked on top of each other in the Rappahannock Canal went viral, garnering millions of views worldwide.

Brad Lamphere, an assistant professor of biology at the University of Mary Washington, said turtles enjoy basking on dry things in water.

“Sometimes the dry thing is another turtle,” he said. “I’ve seen a double-decker before, but not a triple.” Read more.

 

 

Larus Comments on Indus News on U.S. Arms Sales to Taiwan

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Freund Larus

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Freund Larus

Elizabeth Freund Larus, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, commented on pending torpedo sales to Taiwan. Dr. Larus explained that the 1979 Taiwan Relations Act legally obligates the United States to sell arms to Taiwan to defend itself against military threat. The torpedo sales, announced on the day of Tsai Ing-wen’s presidential inauguration, sends a political signal that the United States is upholding a longstanding commitment to a democratic ally.

Larus’ commentary begins at 16 minutes into the program at https://youtu.be/X4bvwmP1OFw.

Rao Added to Virginia Education Work Group

Anand Rao, professor of communications and director of the Speaking Intensive program and Speaking Center

Anand Rao, professor of communications and director of the Speaking Intensive program and Speaking Center

Professor of Communication Anand Rao was recently added to the Virginia Education Work Group to help guide processes for safe, equitable reopening of schools. He is serving as the representative for the Faculty Senate of Virginia. You can find the Governor’s announcement here: https://www.governor.virginia.gov/newsroom/all-releases/2020/may/headline-856846-en.html?fbclid=IwAR1VlsMzzuPSkST9uDp9_K10RppUvbdEiV-KNuyu4DKD5xkHW0ZFroaM5Yg

Poska Presents to Center for Disease Control

Professor of History Allyson Poska

Professor of History Allyson Poska

Dr. Allyson M. Poska, Professor of History, presented her research on the first vaccination efforts in the Spanish Empire to the Center for Disease Control’s Immunization Division.