August 3, 2021

Al-Tikriti Monitors Armenia Parliamentary Elections

Prof. Al-Tikriti at Khor Virap Monastery in Armenia.

Prof. Al-Tikriti at Khor Virap Monastery in Armenia.

From 15-24 June 2021, Middle East History Professor Nabil Al-Tikriti served as a Short Term Observer (STO) for the Organization of Security & Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) in Ararat Province, Armenia.

In the course of this single week deployment, Prof. Al-Tikriti observed the election process for the 20 June 2021 Armenian parliamentary elections. In the course of this observation, he and his STO team visited eight polling stations in and around Ararat City, Armenia. In addition, he was able to visit the Khor Virap Monastery, Garni Temple, Geghard Monastery, Lake Sevan, and Matenadaran Library.

Together with his Polish STO partner, Ms. Halszhka Lachowicz, Prof. Al-Tikriti completed multiple visit reports, monitored the evening count, and carried out other observation requirements as mandated by the OSCE’s Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR). Ms. Lachowicz and Prof. Al-Tikriti’s work contributed to ODIHR’s reporting.

Prof. Al-Tikriti thanks the colleagues who served with him in Ararat, as well as all the wonderful Armenian officials, activists, and election colleagues whom he was fortunate enough to meet in the course of this election observation.

Richards Presents at Faulkner and Yoknaptawpha Conference

Professor of English Gary Richards

Professor of English Gary Richards

Gary Richards, Professor of English, presented the paper “Circling New Orleans: Faulkner’s Mosquitoes and Welty’s ‘No Place for You, My Love'” on the “Remapping Southern Geographies” panel at the 47th annual Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference held digitally July 18-21, 2021. This year’s conference, titled “Faulkner, Welty, Wright: A Mississippi Confluence,” put writer William Faulkner in dialogue with fellow twentieth-century Mississippi writers Eudora Welty and Richard Wright.

Larus Comments on South China Sea Arbitration

Professor and Chair of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Larus

Professor and Chair of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Larus

Department of Political Science and International Affairs Chairman Elizabeth Freund Larus commented on the South China Sea dispute between China and the Philippines. Five years after the SCS arbitration decision in favor of the Philippines, Manila accuses China of continuing to harass Filipino fisherman in the Philippines’ EEZ. The UN lacks an enforcement mechanism to back its 2016 decision, leaving the US as guarantor of maritime security in the region. Professor Larus’ comments to Indus News begin at 4:28 minutes into the program, viewable at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DwRsTUkI0SI

 

Farnsworth Lectures on Political Humor

Stephen Farnsworth, professor of political science and director of the University’s Center for Leadership and Media Studies

Stephen Farnsworth, professor of political science and director of the University’s Center for Leadership and Media Studies

Stephen Farnsworth, professor of political science and director of the University’s Center for Leadership and Media Studies, recently delivered an online lecture, “Political Humor from Johnny Carson to Stephen Colbert,” to the Jewish Community Center of Greater Richmond. Dr. Farnsworth drew upon his recent co-authored book, “Late Night With Trump: Political Humor and the American Presidency,” for that online conversation.

In Virginia governor’s race, a raging debate about education takes center stage (The Washington Post)

Judge dismisses group’s effort to remove Black state senator (The Washington Post; The Philadelphia Tribune)

Trump still butt of late-night comedy jokes | COMMENTARY (Baltimore Sun)

New Book Examines Virginia’s Urban-Rural Divide (WVTF Radio IQ)

CNBC, for the Second Year in a Row, Names Virginia as Best State for Business (Virginia Mercury, Virginia Patch)

Trump joins Rumble as his search for alternative social media platform continues (ABC 6; CBS12; CNY Central)

2022’s midterm elections already are pressuring Democrats, as Wall Street ‘might be praying for Republican gains’ (MarketWatch; Morningstar; Crumpe)

Petition against Louise Lucas seeks to do the unprecedented-recall a Virginia lawmaker (The Virginian-Pilot; Yahoo News)

McAuliffe commits to five debates in Virginia governor’s race, Youngkin to one (The Washington Post; Westport News)

Democrats Playing Too Nice? (CTV News Channel)

Stephen Farnsworth Interview (The Packaged Tourist Show podcast)

Biden Agenda at Risk? (CTV News Channel)

Poska, Davidson Appear on Upcoming ‘With Good Reason’ Episodes

Professor of History Allyson Poska

Professor of History Allyson Poska

Professor of History Allyson Poska and Professor of Political Science Jason Davidson will appear in upcoming episodes of With Good Reason, which airs Sundays at 2 p.m. on Fredericksburg’s Radio IQ 88.3 Digital and at various times throughout the week on stations across Virginia and the United States. Check the website for show times.

In an episode entitled “Pandemics Past,” which airs July 23, Dr. Poska shares the story of 29 orphan boys who crossed the Atlantic Ocean as live incubators for the smallpox vaccine and what lessons we can learn from this early campaign. Also appearing in the episode are experts from Virginia Tech, William & Mary and Virginia Commonwealth University. Listen here. 

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Jason Davidson

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Jason Davidson

The following week, an episode entitled “Entangling Alliances,” airing on July 30, discusses how George Washington famously warned against the dangers of alliances in his Farewell Address. But Dr. Davidson says despite Washington’s misgivings, America has relied on foreign alliances throughout its history. Also appearing in the episode are experts from George Mason University, William & Mary and Virginia Military Institute. Listen here.

Rettinger Discusses College Student Cheating on Brookings Podcast

Professor of Psychological Science and Director of Academic Integrity Programs David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science and Director of Academic Integrity Programs David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger, who is director of Academic Integrity Programs at UMW, participated in the Brookings Institute TechTank Podcast, discussing “How Universities Deal with Student Cheating?”

The COVID pandemic forced many schools and universities to remote education where students logged onto video calls for their classes. At one level, technology was helpful in giving students opportunities to continue learning despite being limited to their homes. Yet during the pandemic, there was a startling increase in the use of online monitoring software designed to prevent student cheating on exams. To discuss these issues, host Darrell West is joined by David Rettinger and Lindsey Barrett. David is a professor of psychological science and director of academic integrity programs at the University of Mary Washington. He also is the president emeritus of the International Center for Academic Integrity. Lindsey is the Fritz Family Fellow at Georgetown University Law Center and the author of a paper entitled “Rejecting Test Surveillance in Higher Education.” Listen here.

Bales’ Book Featured in Chicago’s Daily Herald

Reference and Humanities Librarian Emeritus Jack Bales. Photo Credit: Erin Wysong.

Reference and Humanities Librarian Emeritus Jack Bales. Photo Credit: Erin Wysong.

Reference and Humanities Librarian Emeritus Jack Bales’ book, “The Chicago Cub Shot for Love: A Showgirl’s Crime of Passion and the 1932 World Series,” was the subject of an article in Chicago’s Daily Herald.  The book and article focus on 21-year-old Violet Popovich, a former chorus girl with the Earl Carroll Vanities, who shot 24-year-old Cubs shortstop Billy Jurges in Jurges’ room on July 6, 1932 at the Hotel Carlos in Chicago. Read more.

Gupta Discusses Global Minimum Corporate Tax

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta appeared on CGTN America, on “The Heat: Global leaders agree 15% minimum corporate tax.”

It’s called a global minimum corporate tax – designed to crack down on tax havens and impose new levies on large, profitable multinational corporations.

Details remain to be worked out, but according to the OECD, if enacted the plan could bring in about $150 billion in additional global tax revenue per year — and reshape the global economy. CGTN’s Toby Muse has a report.

To discuss: 

  • John Gong is an economics professor at the University of International Business and Economics in Beijing.
  • Joel Rubin is a democratic strategist and national security analyst. He served as a Deputy U.S. Assistant Secretary of State in the Obama administration.
  • Surupa Gupta is a University of Mary Washington political science and international affairs professor.
  • Arthur Dong is an economics and business professor at Georgetown University. Listen here.

Subramanian Pens Article About Extreme Heat in Inner Cities

Assistant Professor of Communication Sushma Subramanian

Assistant Professor of Communication Sushma Subramanian

Assistant Professor of Journalism Sushma Subramanian penned an article in Croakey Health Media entitled, “US cities are suffocating in the heat. Now they want retribution.”

For years, an elderly man stood as a regular fixture around his East Baltimore neighborhood for the way he would wander the streets in the summer, trying to stay outside his sweltering home until nightfall.

This man, who suffers from dementia, lived in a row house that shared side walls with its neighboring homes. With windows only in the front and back, there was little air flow, which trapped the heat inside. It’s not unusual for the upper floors in such homes to be several degrees hotter than the temperature outdoors.

During a nearly two-week heat wave that swept through the city in July 2019, Cynthia Brooks, executive director of the Bea Gaddy Family Center, a local non-profit that provides food and other services for the poor and homeless, noticed she hadn’t seen the man for a while. Finally, on one of the “code red” days – when the forecasted heat index is expected to be at 105F (40.56C) or higher – he stumbled out of his house, looking disoriented. No one knows how long he had been sitting inside, alone, without a fan or air conditioning.

This man had no one to call – no family was around, and alerting emergency responders could have led to a hefty medical bill. Brooks dropped everything and took him to nearby Johns Hopkins hospital, where he was diagnosed with heatstroke and given treatment. After that incident, Brooks became his legal custodian. He currently lives in a senior home nearby, and she makes his treatment decisions.

This man represents the population in Baltimore most likely to face the personal impacts of the climate crisis. Around the country, global heating is increasing the frequency, intensity and duration of summer heat waves. The recent triple-digit temperatures across the Pacific north-west, where air conditioning in homes isn’t common, highlight the real-world hardships caused by extreme heat exposure and how the elderly and homeless suffer disproportionately from physical discomfort and worse health outcomes. Read more.

Richardson Final Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

Outgoing College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s final column in The Free Lance-Star is entitled, “Repotting the Plant.”

I’m not a gardener, but I understand the concept of repotting plants.

At some point, the nutrients in the dirt become depleted. Replacing the old dirt with new soil full of nutrients helps the plant grow. Of course, your plant may be outgrowing its pot, so a bigger pot might reduce the constriction on the plant’s growth.

I am the plant in the pot, and it’s time to repot me! I need new nutrients and, while not necessarily a bigger pot, a different pot. After 10 wonderfully challenging years at the University of Mary Washington, I need new challenges to address. This will be my last column. Read more.