June 17, 2021

Biden needs to talk about the costs of our wars to America’s allies (The Hill)

Davidson Comments on Sacrifices of America’s Allies

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Jason Davidson

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Jason Davidson

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Jason Davidson was interviewed by several international media outlets on his “Costs of War” report, commissioned by Brown and Boston universities, which focuses on contributions of America’s allies in Afghanistan.

“Americans do not fully understand, do not acknowledge, the sacrifices that allies made in Afghanistan,” Davidson recently told The Guardian. 

“It’s something that not only doesn’t get attention from those who are critics of the allies. It doesn’t even get the attention that it deserves from those who are generally cheerleaders for allies, like the current administration. I would like to see more American policymaker acknowledgment and discussion with the public of the costs that America’s allies have incurred in these wars.”

Dr. Davidson also penned an op-ed in The Hill entitled, “Biden needs to talk about the costs of our wars to America’s allies.” Read more.

British troops were twice as likely to be killed in Afghanistan as US forces (The Guardian; The Times)

Key NATO Allies Were More Than Twice as Likely to Die in Afghanistan Than U.S. Forces, According to New Study (Forbes)

British troops were twice as likely to be killed in Afghanistan as US forces (London Daily)

British soldiers were more than twice as likely to die during peak of Afghan War than US troops, report reveals (Daily Mail)

With Afghanistan Withdrawal Underway, New Report Reveals Costs of Post-9/11 Wars for US Allies (Common Dreams)

Key NATO allies twice as likely to die in Afghanistan as US forces: report (Ecns.cn)

The British Costs of the War in Afghanistan (New Eastern Outlook)

Student Research Fuels Professor’s ‘Costs of War’ Report

As the 20th anniversary of the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, draws near, troops are finally leaving the dusty deserts and treacherous mountains of Afghanistan. The departure marks the end of America’s longest war and highlights a full-circle moment for UMW Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Jason Davidson. “I was always really […]

British troops were twice as likely to be killed in Afghanistan as US forces (The Guardian; The Times)

‘An ugly peace’: Biden’s Sept. withdrawal plan leaves Afghanistan’s future in doubt (KATV; ABC News 4; WTOV9)

Davidson Comments on Biden’s Afghanistan Exit Plans on ABC

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Jason Davidson

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Jason Davidson

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Jason Davidson provided insight to an ABC story on the Biden administration’s announcement that troops will be withdrawn from Afghanistan by September 11.

“I think the Biden administration is trying to balance the president’s desire to get out and cut U.S. losses, but also the fact that the Taliban has not really complied with their side of the deal so far and they are unlikely to fully comply with a deal, period,” said Jason Davidson, a political scientist at the University of Mary Washington. Read more.

 

Davidson Pens FLS Editorial on Madeleine Albright for ‘Great Lives’ Lecture

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Jason Davidson

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Jason Davidson

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Jason Davidson penned an editorial in The Free Lance-Star in advance of his “Great Lives” lecture on former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright on Tuesday, March 2. The lecture can be viewed here.

THE NOTION that the United States can and should be a force for good in the world has been under siege from both sides of the political spectrum in recent years.

Many on the left have argued that the U.S. does more harm than good when it acts abroad and, as such, should focus exclusively on the problems it faces at home. On the right, a growing number of voices have argued that the U.S. should let others solve their problems (and suffer the consequences if they are unable to do so).

Madeleine Albright, the first female secretary of state, firmly believed that the U.S. could be a force for good in the world and, in so doing, would best serve its own interests. Read more.

GREAT LIVES: Albright believed U.S. was a force for good in the world (The Free Lance-Star)

Davidson Discusses America’s Alliances in New Book, Newsweek

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Jason Davidson

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Jason Davidson

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Jason Davidson’s new book, America’s Entangling Alliances, was recently published by Georgetown University Press. Description: In America’s Entangling Alliances, Professor Davidson challenges long-held assumptions about the costs and benefits of American alliances. He shows that, contrary to conventional wisdom, the United States has not been averse to forming alliances for most of its history. In fact, U.S. presidents and Congress have viewed it as in the country’s best interest to enter into a variety of security arrangements from the beginning.

Davidson also discussed the United States’ geopolitical battle with China, as well as its partners in the Quadrilateral Security Dialogue – Australia, Japan and India – with Newsweek. Read more.

US, China’s Geopolitical Battle for Asia Shapes New Power Dynamic for Region (Newsweek)