July 4, 2020

Jason Davidson’s Article Published in Scholarly Journal

Associate Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Jason Davidson’s article, “France, Britain and the intervention in Libya: an integrated analysis,” appears in the most recent issue of The Cambridge Review of International Affairs.

Jason Davidson Delivers Briefing in D.C.

Jason Davidson

Jason Davidson

Associate Professor of Political Science Jason W. Davidson delivered a briefing titled “Italy’s Security Policy after the 2013 Elections: Still in the Game?” at an invitation-only event on April 16 organized by the National Intelligence Council and the State Department’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research.

Davidson, who argued that the 2013 elections will have a minor impact on Italy’s security policy, was one of 11 presenters from around the world. About 40 members of the U.S. intelligence community attended the event.

UMW Faculty to Discuss Anniversary of Iraq War

Nabil Al-Tikriti

Nabil Al-Tikriti

Eric Bonds

Eric Bonds

UMW faculty members will discuss the 10 year anniversary of the Iraq War during a roundtable on Wednesday, Feb. 13. The discussion will begin at 4 p.m. in Combs Hall, Room 139 and is free and open to the public.

The roundtable will feature Nabil Al-Tikriti, associate professor of history, Eric Bonds, assistant professor of sociology, Jason Davidson, associate professor of political science and Stephen Farnsworth, professor of political science and director of the Center for Leadership and Media Studies. All four faculty members have published scholarly research on aspects of the war. Ranjit Singh, associate professor of political science, will serve as the moderator.

For more information, contact Jason Davidson at jdavidso@umw.edu or (540) 654-1509.

Jason Davidson

Stephen Farnsworth

Stephen Farnsworth

Ranjit Singh
Ranjit Singh

Jason Davidson’s Article Appears in Journal

Jason Davidson

Associate Professor of Political Science Jason Davidson’s article “The Republican Ticket and Foreign Policy: A Test of Inexperience,” is featured in Aspenia Online, the web version of the Aspen Institute’s quarterly journal. The journal offers international analysis and commentary in English and Italian.

 

Jason Davidson’s Article Appears in Journal

Jason Davidson

Associate Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Jason Davidson’s essay “Assessing NATO’s Experience in Libya” appears in the journal Aspenia. The journal is a publication of the Aspen Institute Italia.

Jason Davidson Publishes Commentary in The Diplomat

Jason Davidson

Associate Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Jason W. Davidson’s article “Ignoring Allies in Afghanistan,” was published in the Feb. 15 issue of The Diplomat. The article discusses U.S. policy  and strategy in Afghanistan.

Jason Davidson Published in Volume

Jason Davidson

Associate Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Jason W. Davidson’s chapter, “Italy at War: Explaining the Italian Contribution to the Kosovo War (1999),” was recently published by Lexington Books in a volume edited by Giampiero Giacomello and Bertjan Verbeek titled Italy’s Foreign Policy in the Twenty-First Century.

Jason Davidson Offers Opinion on D.C. Radio Program

Jason Davidson, associate professor of political science, was a featured guest on Voice of Russia radio on September 7. In the interview, Davidson discusses the legacy of 9/11 and the changes in security since the attack.

Listen to the full interview.

Jason Davidson

Jason Davidson, associate professor of political science and international affairs, will discuss his new book, “America’s Allies and War: Kosovo, Afghanistan, and Iraq,” during a book forum at the Cato Institute in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, May 10 at 4 p.m.

The book forum is free and open to the public. Advance registration is required for all Cato events. Seating is limited. The forum also will be streamed live over the Internet. For more information, visit http://www.cato.org/event.php?eventid=7943.

The website says, “The United States pledges to defend our NATO allies under Article V of the North Atlantic Treaty. Why, and in what ways, do the allies reciprocate? Jason Davidson will present evidence from his unique analysis of transatlantic burden-sharing to explain why Britain, France, and Italy provide or refuse military support for U.S.-led uses of force. Sixty original interviews with top policymakers and analysts provide insight into allies’ decisions regarding the Kosovo War (1999), Afghanistan (2001), and the Iraq War (2003). Davidson shows that such decisions reflect a combination of factors such as alliance value, threat, prestige, and electoral politics. Join us for a discussion that will include recommendations for how U.S. policymakers can increase the allies’ contributions to global security, and shift some of the burdens of defense off the shoulders of American taxpayers.”

Jason Davidson

Jason W. Davidson, associate professor of political science and international affairs, had the column “America’s Allies and Libya: Why Coalitions Make Sense” published March 30 in the Aspen Institute Italia’s foreign affairs journal.

Read the column at http://www.aspeninstitute.it/aspenia-online/article/america%E2%80%99s-allies-and-libya-why-coalitions-make-sense.

In addition, Davidson has the book ”America’s Allies and War: Kosovo, Afghanistan, and Iraq” scheduled for release in April by Palgrave Macmillan. 

Visit http://us.macmillan.com/americasalliesandwar to learn more about the book, which is especially relevant in light of the unrest and war in Libya.

The publisher’s summary says, “Why do Britain, France, and Italy provide or refuse military support for U.S.-led uses of force? This book provides a unique, multiple-case study analysis of transatlantic burden-sharing. Sixty original interviews with top policymakers and analysts provide insight into allies’ decisions regarding the Kosovo War (1999), Afghanistan (2001), and the Iraq War (2003). The cases show that neoclassical realist factors–alliance value, threat, prestige, and electoral politics–explain allies’ decisions better than constructivist factors–identity and norms. The book briefly covers additional cases (Vietnam, Lebanon, the Persian Gulf War, Somalia) and concludes with recommendations for increasing future allied military support.”

In Patricia A. Weitsman’s endorsement, the Ohio University political science professor writes, “Jason W. Davidson’s exceptional book is a must read for scholars and policy makers interested in knowing why states put troops in harm’s way for the benefit of their allies.  Davidson’s masterful explanation of burden sharing is essential knowledge for students of history and politics, as well as decision makers crafting strategy for the future.”