March 3, 2021

Walker’s Co-Authored Paper Featured on University of Colorado News Site

Assistant Professor of Education Jennifer Walker

Assistant Professor of Education Jennifer Walker

College of Education Assistant Professor Jennifer Walker was featured in an article in Communique, the official news publication of the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, about an article she co-authored with Colorado faculty member Kathy Randolph entitled, “Teacher Self-Advocacy for the Shared Responsibility of Classroom and Behavior Management.”

With more than 40 percent of new teachers leaving the profession after five years, teacher burnout is among the highest for all professions in the United States – and special education teachers can face even greater challenges. But with the right tools, special educators can lighten the load, writes Kathy Randolph, assistant professor of teaching and learning, in new research published in SAGE Journals. Read more.

Say ‘Thank You’ To Dining Workers

It's All Thanks to Them graphicThe University Dining management team wants to let all of the dining employees know how much their hard work, dedication, and friendly service are genuinely appreciated by everyone here at UMW. Almost every day we get comments from students or members of the faculty and staff about how much they love and appreciate our workers, and we’re hoping you’ll share those sentiments with them by writing “Thank You” notes, signing display banners, or submitting THX messages online in preparation for our Employee Appreciation Week that begins on March 1st.

Please stop by the Dining Concierge desk on the 2nd floor of the University Center during the week of February 22nd to sign our banner, write messages on postcards, or drop off your own notes of appreciation. There will be a host at the Concierge station between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. and between 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. each day, but you can still drop off a note or sign the banner if the station is unattended. We know that many of you have favorite team members, but we do want all of our staff to get recognized.

Photo Opportunities! We’d love to take photos of you holding up messages of appreciation! You can do that, too, when you stop by the Concierge! We’ll put the photos up on our monitors and on EagleVision during the week of March 1st. During that week all of our staff members (we hope!) will be wearing buttons with their pictures on them (with no mask!), so you can see their great smiles! We invite you to give them lots of great feedback, and let them all know how much you appreciate their service.

We’ve got lots of special “thank you” events planned for them that week, from candy bars, to ice cream treats, to donuts and prize drawings, but your personal words of appreciation mean more to them than any prize we can give them. For more information, contact Rose Benedict, University Dining Marketing Manager, at rbenedic@UMW.edu or 540-654-2169.

University Seeking Feedback

There have been many changes in UMW campus life due to COVID-19 and the resulting increase in virtual learning and teleworking. To better serve the UMW community, University Dining would like to learn whether the faculty and staff are aware of the current dining options (especially those that are designed exclusively for the faculty and staff); whether these options are being used; and whether there are new or different options that might better meet dining needs and expectations.

Members of UMW’s faculty and staff are invited to complete the online feedback form in order to give their views on these and any other aspects of University Dining services. For additional information contact Rose Benedict, University Dining Marketing Manager, at rbenedic@umw.edu.

Rettinger Appears on Inside Higher Ed Podcast

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger was a guest on Inside Higher Ed’s The Key podcast. Rettinger, who is the director of academic integrity programs at UMW and president emeritus of the International Center for Academic Integrity, discussed issues of cheating, test proctoring tools and academic misconduct.

Farnsworth Comments in the News

Stephen Farnsworth, professor of political science and director of the University’s Center for Leadership and Media Studies

Stephen Farnsworth, professor of political science and director of the University’s Center for Leadership and Media Studies

Stephen Farnsworth, professor of political science and director of the University’s Center for Leadership and Media Studies, has been quoted in several regional, national and international news stories:

How blue is Trump’s shadow in Virginia? This year’s governor’s race is already shaping up as a key barometer. (The Washington Post)

Census delay could complicate some Fredericksburg-area supervisors, school board elections (The Free Lance-Star)

Snyder pushes to fully reopen schools, businesses in GOP bid for Virginia Governor (Potomac Local News)

Trump Eyes a Political Comeback (CTV News Channel)

MCKL holding free live webinar on reviewing the 2020 U.S. Election (Citizens Journal)

Biden’s $1.9T Rescue Package (CTV News Channel)

From savior to bully: Is Cuomo’s hardball style falling out of favor? (The Christian Science Monitor)

Harris, Catron Interviewed for Article on Belmont Staircase

The horseshoe staircase at Belmont, home of Gari Melchers.

The horseshoe staircase at Belmont, home of Gari Melchers.

UMW Museums Executive Director Scott Harris and Belmont Assistant Director and Curator Joanna Catron were interviewed for an article in The Free Lance-Star about the restoration of the “horseshoe staircase” at Belmont.

Some stories are quick turnarounds I can share mere hours after learning the details.

Today’s story—about the removal and restoration of the “horseshoe staircase” at the front of Gari Melchers Home and Studio in Falmouth—is not one of those. That’s partly due to COVID-19 delays, but also because of having to digest more than a century of history.

The staircase was likely commissioned in Philadelphia around 1850. The company doing the restoration, Keswick-based Stokes of England, has done work for Prince Charles, the sultan of Oman and Patricia Kluge.

In an earlier column, I mentioned that a restored steamboat pilothouse in the Northern Neck had been voted one of Virginia’s most endangered artifacts. That brought a message from Scott Harris, the executive director of museums at the University of Mary Washington. He said the horseshoe staircase railing at Belmont was among the first artifacts to get that designation a decade or so ago.

I joined Harris and Joanna Catron, the assistant director and curator at Belmont, to examine the staircase. The wrought-iron railing was most likely installed in about 1850 by Joseph Burwell Ficklen, the owner of the estate at that time. Read more.

Eagle Awards 2021 — Submit Your Nominations Now!

Eagle Award Nominations are now open! Help us recognize outstanding students and programs that have continued to persevere this year. You can find out more information about the Eagle Awards on our website.

The nomination form will be open through Sunday, March 14. Please submit nominations here.

We are also currently looking for faculty, staff, and students to serve on the selection committee. If you are interested in volunteering, please email Sandrine Sutphin at ssutphin@umw.edu.

The virtual award ceremony will be air in late April through SAE’s YouTube channel.

 

Marsh Pens Editorial on Anna Julia Cooper and W. E. B. DuBois for ‘Great Lives’ Lecture

Kristin Marsh, professor and chair of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Kristin Marsh, professor and chair of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Professor of Sociology Kristin Marsh penned an editorial on authors and Black rights activists Anna Julia Cooper and W. E. B. DuBois in The Free Lance-Star in advance of her “Great Lives” lecture on Feb. 23. View the lecture here.

AT THE TURN of the 20th century, William Edward Burghardt Du Bois (1868–1963) was one of the most renowned social justice intellectuals in the U.S. He helped found the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), edited its popular journal, The Crisis, and established the first School of Sociology at Atlanta University.

Toward an empirically grounded critical race theory, the DuBoisian school examined the extensive institutional and interpersonal racism facing African Americans. Du Bois was a staunch supporter of liberal education for blacks at a time when whites favored the vocational education advocated by Booker T. Washington.

Anna Julia Haywood Cooper (1858–1964) was as fully engaged in public debates surrounding racial uplift as was Du Bois. An educator herself, Cooper led the M Street High School for blacks in Washington, D.C., where she insisted on providing students with the best college preparatory curriculum available. Read more.

Blakemore Pens Editorial on General MacArthur for ‘Great Lives’ Lecture

Professor of Modern European History and Military History Porter Blakemore

Professor of Modern European History and Military History Porter Blakemore

Professor of Modern European History and Military History Porter Blakemore, a former naval officer and aviator, penned an editorial in The Free Lance-Star newspaper in advance of his “Great Lives” lecture on General Douglas MacArthur on Feb. 18. View the lecture here.

DOUGLAS MacArthur is one of the most famous American military officers of the first half of the 20th century. As a young brigadier general in 1918, he was poised for a distinguished future that held great promise.

Yet his potential produced enigmatic success and failure in the career that followed. Today, while some historians consider him one of the great captains of history, others disparage his accomplishments.

The truth falls somewhere in the middle. Read more.

Bales Pens Editorial on Horatio Alger for ‘Great Lives’ Lecture

Reference and Humanities Librarian Emeritus Jack Bales

Reference and Humanities Librarian Emeritus Jack Bales

UMW Reference and Humanities Librarian Emeritus Jack Bales penned an editorial in The Free Lance-Star on children’s novelist Horatio Alger that ran in advance of his “Great Lives” lecture on Feb. 16. View the lecture here.

NO AUTHOR of children’s books during the last 30 years of the 19th century was more popular than Horatio Alger Jr. (1832–1899). In subsequent decades, his stereotypical “rags-to-riches” narratives became so familiar that in our own times, the term “Horatio Alger story” has come to be commonly used as shorthand for a person who, through diligence and hard work, rises from poverty to achieve notable success.

The author himself was born in 1832 in Revere, Mass., the son of a Harvard-educated Unitarian minister. Intending to follow in his father’s footsteps, Horatio Jr. graduated from Harvard in 1852.

The several years after graduation, however, were marked by Alger’s indecisive search for a career. Although he was preparing for the ministry, he had a longing to write. His first works, mostly short stories and poems, were aimed at adults. Read more.