October 28, 2020

Image of Love: Wedding Photo a UMW Instagram Sensation

UMW asked to repost this photo of the wedding of Aaron McPherson ’12 (left) and Evan Smallwood ’15 at UMW’s renovated amphitheatre. It exploded, garnering 1,833 likes, 34 comments, 205 shares, 2,072 total engagement and 7,840 people reached. Photo by The Girl Tyler.

UMW asked to repost this photo of the wedding of Aaron McPherson ’12 (left) and Evan Smallwood ’15 at UMW’s renovated amphitheatre. It exploded, garnering 1,833 likes, 34 comments, 205 shares, 2,072 total engagement and 7,840 people reached. Photo by The Girl Tyler.

Evan Smallwood ’15 was nervous. He’d tried on six different sweaters but nothing seemed right. He paced as he dressed, peering every few minutes out his Russell Hall window to check for his date. Just as he’d settled on a green quarter-zip, Aaron McPherson ’12 pulled into view, and Smallwood rushed downstairs to meet him.

McPherson had tucked something extra into his SUV – a bouquet of Smallwood’s favorite, sunflowers. He’d pondered the purchase, since after all, it was only the couple’s first outing. But then again, it was Valentine’s Day!

Today, eight years later, the two – whose wedding is the only one to take place at UMW’s Heslep Amphitheatre since a $3 million renovation wrapped up in 2018 – celebrate their first Valentine’s Day as a married couple. A photo from their special day garnered nearly 2,000 Instagram likes and became the most popular post in Mary Washington social media history. UMW had made an indelible tag on them, too, sparking their love for each other and dual careers in higher education. Read more.

UMW Receives $1.25 Million Gift for Amphitheater Restoration

A $1.25 million pledge from a University of Mary Washington alumna has moved the university closer to its $3-million fundraising goal to restore its historic amphitheater.   Josephine McPherson Heslep’56 and her husband, Donald The pledge, made by Josephine McPherson Heslep’56 and her husband, Donald, of Richmond, Va., helps provide a total of $2.5 million toward the only capital project in the Mary Washington First Campaign. The amount raised includes a $1 million pledge from Robert and Alice Andrews Jepson ’64 of Savannah, Ga., and more than $250,000 in gifts and pledges from other alumni and friends, “We still need to raise another half a million for the project,” says UMW President Richard V. Hurley, “but with the tremendous amount of nostalgia and pride our alumni feel for the amphitheater, we’re confident we will reach the final goal soon.” For more than a century, the open air amphitheater has been an integral part of the Mary Washington experience. Located in the grove behind Lee and Trinkle halls, it was the venue of choice for commencements, May Day celebrations, plays, concerts and even weddings. With age and recent storm damage, however, the site has been declared a safety hazard. “I remember the amphitheater from my time as a student,” says Josephine Heslep. “We’re happy to offer our help so that once again it will be a great gathering place and performance venue.” In past years, the Hesleps have provided significant support to the UMW Philharmonic. They also are members of the UMW President’s Council, Washington Society and Heritage Society. When complete, the $3-million restoration will return the amphitheater to its 1952-1953 appearance by repairing and reconstructing damaged and missing pieces, and returning the surrounding woodlands to pristine condition. It also will provide seating for approximately 600 people on weather-resilient benches and chairs. The amphitheater is one of seven priorities of the $50-million Mary Washington First Campaign. The comprehensive fundraising initiative began July 1, 2011, went public April 26, 2014, and is expected to conclude June 30, 2016. For more information, go to marywashingtonfirst.umw.edu or call 540-654-1024.

Jepsons Give $1 Million to Restore UMW Amphitheater

The University of Mary Washington amphitheater, a much-loved feature of the Fredericksburg campus, is preparing for its second act, thanks in large part to a $1 million challenge gift from Robert S. and Alice Andrews Jepson ’64.   Originally constructed in 1913 and officially dedicated in 1923, the amphitheater – located in a grove of trees near Sunken Road – has been home to many UMW traditions at various points in its history. The amphitheater hosted commencement ceremonies from the 1930s until 1958, and Mary Washington’s unique Devil-Goat Day through the 1970s, in addition to May Day celebrations, numerous concerts and theater productions. And, on nice days, some professors have been known to relocate their classes to that area. A rendering by Train & Partners Architects shows what the amphitheater might look like after renovation. In 1997, the Board of Visitors allocated $40,000 to make the area safe, but not to modernize it. In recent years, the amphitheater has fallen into disrepair, yet it remains a cherished part of campus. Consultants recently examined the site, and concluded that the amphitheater must be restored now or it could be lost forever. They estimate the restoration to cost $3 million. “Students continue to enjoy the amphitheater, even in its current state, and they also care about preserving the history behind it,” said President Richard V. Hurley. “I am absolutely thrilled that Bob and Alice Jepson have agreed to help support this important restoration initiative.” The restoration would return the amphitheater to its 1952-1953 appearance by repairing and reconstructing damaged and missing pieces. It would provide seating for approximately 600 people on weather-resilient benches and chairs while incorporating accommodations for ADA accessibility. “I can’t wait to get back to see all the things that have happened since I was there and to take time to walk through the amphitheater,” said Alice Jepson. “When President Hurley told us that students still love the amphitheater, we decided our money would be well invested in helping to restore this area of campus that holds so many special memories for alumni and students alike.” The restoration would return the amphitheater to its 1952-1953 appearance. Rendering courtesy of Train & Partners Architects In addition to the gift from the Jepsons, two other couples have made significant gifts to support the amphitheater restoration: Elmer Morris Jr. ’50 and Marceline Weatherly Morris ’50 of King George, Va., and Laurie Mansell Reich ’79 and Henry E. Reich Jr. of Kittanning, Pa. Architectural renderings projecting the amphitheater’s appearance after restoration were prepared by Train & Partners Architects of Charlottesville, Va. “Currently, the amphitheater is just sitting in the woods degrading more and more every day. The longer it sits, the more difficult and more expensive it will be to restore, and that’s a shame,” says Design Architect Kirk Train. A timeline for restoration and additional fundraising opportunities will be available in the coming months.