October 30, 2020

Fun Is Not Canceled: A Student To-Do List

Even with strict health guidelines in place, there is still plenty to do at UMW, including this “Halloweens” event. A special calendar and list contain a collection of activities and ideas for staying engaged.

Even with strict health guidelines in place, there is still plenty to do at UMW, including this “Halloweens” event. A special calendar and list contain a collection of activities and ideas for staying engaged.

The bell tower on Double Drive still chimes twice a day. Campus Walk clamors with students changing classes. Adirondack chairs continue to migrate all over Ball Circle – except for the space occupied by the white dining tent that went up this spring due to COVID-19.

In an unprecedented semester of health guidelines, there are plenty of do’s and don’ts. Time-honored Mary Washington traditions are still on track, but they’re looking more digital and distanced these days. In the midst of it all, University of Mary Washington students just want to have fun.

A calendar of scheduled events and “The List,” a growing document of brainstormed diversions – learn a TikTok dance, create a time capsule, grab a free Campus Rec Frisbee – show what students CAN do on campus.

“Fun is not canceled,” said Student Activities and Engagement Director Sandrine Sutphin, who’s working with other departments to push out ideas to keep students involved, connected and de-stressed. “You don’t have to sit in your room. There are still lots of things you can do.” Read more.

Fun Is Not Canceled: A Student To-Do List

The bell tower on Double Drive still chimes twice a day. Campus Walk clamors with students changing classes. Adirondack chairs continue to migrate all over Ball Circle – except for the space occupied by the white dining tent that went up this spring due to COVID-19. In an unprecedented semester of health guidelines, there are […]

Virtual Leadership Colloquium Aims to Help Women ‘Level-Up’

University of Mary Washington’s 27th annual Women’s Leadership Colloquium @UMW will be held virtually this year.

University of Mary Washington’s 27th annual Women’s Leadership Colloquium @UMW will be held virtually this year.

The Women’s Leadership Colloquium @UMW is changing things up. The 27th annual event, held virtually this year, includes a new special session for senior leaders and puts a techy spin on tried-and-true offerings, with Zoom-room breakouts and an abbreviated agenda to accommodate the busy multi-taskers who typically attend.

“We’ve challenged ourselves to offer the same quality experience attendees have come to expect, but in a new way,” said UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson, who chairs the colloquium board. “The day will be different, but it’s another terrific program.”

A staple of coaching and camaraderie for women who strive to reach new heights in their chosen careers, the colloquium provides tools, strategies and inspiration for “leveling-up” leadership skills, both professionally and personally. The morning-long event features a Rolodex of networking opportunities, breakout sessions and more, plus a motivational keynote address. Private timeslots with prominent Fredericksburg-area coaching professionals and a workshop for senior leaders are available in the afternoon for an additional fee.

“Everyone will have the best seat in the house,” UMW Executive Director of Continuing and Professional Studies Kimberly Young said of this year’s virtual format. “It’s shorter, so there’s less time away from work, and none of this will sacrifice networking.” Read more.

Camera Captures UMW’s Resolve During COVID-19

Bench-sitting looks a little bit different in the time of COVID-19, but UMW juniors Kira Frazee (left) and Allison Bliss find a way to enjoy the popular UMW pastime while seated separately. Photo by Suzanne Carr Rossi.

Bench-sitting looks a little bit different in the time of COVID-19, but UMW juniors Kira Frazee (left) and Allison Bliss find a way to enjoy the popular UMW pastime while seated separately. Photo by Suzanne Carr Rossi.

Masks are typically worn on Halloween. Social distancing is practiced during flu-season physicians’ visits. COVID-19 has flung these phenomena into the mainstream and into microcosms of it, on college campuses everywhere. As the University of Mary Washington community perseveres through the pandemic – monitoring, masking, distancing, cleaning, testing and more – a rigorous liberal arts and sciences education remains the mission.

The Fredericksburg campus has been reimagined – classrooms reconfigured, athletic conditioning modified, residence halls re-arranged, dining options altered – with a focus on slowing the spread of the virus and continuing to provide a transformative college experience.

So what does UMW really look like these days? Here, in 22 photos, Mary Washington shares a snapshot of campus life during COVID-19. Read more.

Virtual Leadership Colloquium Aims to Help Women ‘Level-Up’

The Women’s Leadership Colloquium @UMW is changing things up. The 27th annual event, held virtually this year, includes a new special session for senior leaders and puts a techy spin on tried-and-true offerings, with Zoom-room breakouts and an abbreviated agenda to accommodate the busy multi-taskers who typically attend. “We’ve challenged ourselves to offer the same quality […]

Camera Captures UMW’s Resolve During COVID-19

Masks are typically worn on Halloween. Social distancing is practiced during flu-season physicians’ visits. COVID-19 has flung these phenomena into the mainstream and into microcosms of it, on college campuses everywhere. As the University of Mary Washington community perseveres through the pandemic – monitoring, masking, distancing, cleaning, testing and more – a rigorous liberal arts […]

UMW, City Work Together to Prevent Spread of Virus

First-year UMW student Caliyah Ash stands outside the Fredericksburg Area Museum, wearing a mask. A Fredericksburg/UMW joint task force is working to help ensure students comply with the University’s COVID-19 health guidelines even off campus.

First-year UMW student Caliyah Ash stands outside the Fredericksburg Area Museum, wearing a mask. A Fredericksburg/UMW joint task force is working to help ensure students comply with the University’s COVID-19 health guidelines even off campus.

Longtime partners, the University of Mary Washington and the City of Fredericksburg, have teamed up once again. This time, in an effort to slow the spread of coronavirus in the local community.

When in-person classes resumed at UMW on Sept. 14, after a three-week delay prompted by the pandemic, the University enforced a strict “MMDC” – monitor, mask, distance and clean – policy, with reminders and precautionary measures set up across campus. With large numbers of college students headed back to the Fredericksburg area, a COVID-19 Joint Task Force, comprised of city officials and university administrators, began meeting weekly in August, even before their return, to ensure guideline compliance both on and off campus.

“The open dialogue of this task force between the City and UMW is very helpful for tracking the efforts and effects of COVID-19 both on campus and elsewhere in the City,” said Fredericksburg Fire Chief Michael Jones. Read more.

Matthew Doyle to Deliver UMW Disability Awareness Keynote

Special Olympian Matthew Doyle found a few minutes yesterday to FaceTime his friend Erin Malkiewicz. He wanted her feedback on the Disability Awareness Month keynote address he’ll deliver to the University of Mary Washington community. The talk, scheduled for tomorrow at 5 p.m. on Zoom, is open to the public. “If it wasn’t through Zoom, […]

Local Special Olympian to Deliver UMW Disability Awareness Keynote

Matthew Doyle, who has Down Syndrome, will deliver the keynote address for UMW’s Disability Awareness Month celebration on Thursday, Oct. 15, at 5 p.m. Here, Doyle speaks at the Special Olympics State Basketball Championships several years ago.

Matthew Doyle, who has Down Syndrome, will deliver the keynote address for UMW’s Disability Awareness Month celebration on Thursday, Oct. 15, at 5 p.m. Here, Doyle speaks at the Special Olympics State Basketball Championships several years ago.

Special Olympian Matthew Doyle found a few minutes yesterday to FaceTime his friend Erin Malkiewicz. He wanted her feedback on the Disability Awareness Month keynote address he’ll deliver to the University of Mary Washington community. The talk, scheduled for tomorrow at 5 p.m. on Zoom, is open to the public.

“If it wasn’t through Zoom, I think he’d get a standing ovation,” said Malkiewicz, a first-year student who’s paired with Doyle in UMW’s Best Buddies chapter.

During the address, presented by the James Farmer Multicultural Center, Doyle, who has Down Syndrome, will discuss his involvement with organizations like Special Olympics and Best Buddies, and reflect on life in general.“If it wasn’t through Zoom, I think he’d get a standing ovation,” said Malkiewicz, a first-year student who’s paired with Doyle in UMW’s Best Buddies chapter.

He’s been a few places. Just look at his pictures on Facebook, where he’s dressed in a wetsuit for the Polar Plunge, at fundraisers with friends and getting kissed on the cheek on the beach. He’s living the life. And he has a voice. And he wants the millions of Americans with disabilities – and everyone else – to hear it. Read more.

Disability Studies Course Gains Acceptance at UMW

UMW senior Claudia Woods, president of the student club DiversAbility (shown here in a psychology course last year with her service dog, Hearo), is taking “Intro to Disability Studies.” Offered for the first time this fall, the course takes an interdisciplinary look at disability as key to the human experience as race or gender. Photo by Suzanne Carr Rossi.

UMW senior Claudia Woods, president of the student club DiversAbility (shown here in a psychology course last year with her service dog, Hearo), is taking “Intro to Disability Studies.” Offered for the first time this fall, the course takes an interdisciplinary look at disability as key to the human experience as race or gender. Photo by Suzanne Carr Rossi.

One in four Americans lives with a disability, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. At the University of Mary Washington, it’s one in eight.

“With those sorts of numbers, it’s mind-boggling [that] disability doesn’t have more automatic inclusion when people think about diversity,” said UMW Professor of English Chris Foss.

As the Americans with Disabilities Act’s 30th year and October’s Disability Awareness Month shine a light on one of the country’s most underrepresented groups, so does a new UMW course. Offered for the first time this fall, Intro to Disability Studies (IDS) delves into the 21st-century experience of a diverse population, exploring cognitive, sensory, mobility and other differences as just as essential to the human condition as gender and race.

The 16-week course fans out across disciplines, examining disability throughout the lifespan in historical, political, social and other contexts. Years in the making, the class is team-taught by faculty and staff – from art history, education, English, historic preservation, psychology and the Office of Disability Resources (ODR) – who’ve poured their time and passion into the topic in hopes it gains traction. Read more.