December 8, 2019

Parking Lot Project Highlights UMW, City Partnership

City Council member Tim Duffy (left) shakes hands with UMW President Troy Paino after the two cut the symbolic ribbon at the expanded Battlefield Athletic Complex parking lot. Photo by Karen Pearlman.

City Council member Tim Duffy (left) shakes hands with UMW President Troy Paino after the two cut the symbolic ribbon at the expanded Battlefield Athletic Complex parking lot. Photo by Karen Pearlman.

A ribbon cutting on Nov. 22 for a newly expanded parking lot at UMW’s Battlefield Athletic Complex illustrates a concerted effort by the University and the City of Fredericksburg to work collaboratively on community issues.

The project, which enlarged the lot between UMW’s Tennis Center and Physical Plant to eight times its original size, aims to ease cramped parking conditions on Hanover Street during University-hosted athletic events. It also is intended to bolster the athletic complex’s attractiveness for tournament use and support economic development opportunities.

“This lot is more than just parking,” said City Manager Tim Baroody. “It’s a partnership.” Read more.

Parking Lot Project Highlights UMW, City Partnership

A ribbon cutting Friday for a newly expanded parking lot at UMW’s Battlefield Athletic Complex illustrates a concerted effort by the University and the City of Fredericksburg to work collaboratively on community issues. The project, which enlarged the lot between UMW’s Tennis Center and Physical Plant to eight times its original size, aims to ease […]

Jepson Science Center Renovation Revs Up Student Research

Thanh-Binh Duong’s research on microplastics could be vital to the health of the Chesapeake Bay. Carmen Cantrell studies hydrology on the hunt for dangerous contaminants. The two UMW seniors are among scores of Mary Washington students whose important undergraduate research stands to reach new heights, thanks to the Jepson Science Center’s recent renovation. The project […]

Leadership Colloquium Challenges Women: ‘Be Your Own Hero’

Cosmo Fujiyama, who owns a consulting firm in education design, was the keynote speaker at the 26th annual Women’s Leadership Colloquium @ UMW. Photo by Suzanne Carr Rossi.

Cosmo Fujiyama, who owns a consulting firm in education design, was the keynote speaker at the 26th annual Women’s Leadership Colloquium @ UMW. Photo by Suzanne Carr Rossi.

At 25, Cosmo Fujiyama was at a crossroads, stalled between an internship and grad school. She’d had a long day at a professional conference, and she was feeling tired and drained. The last place she wanted to go was to a group dinner at P.F. Chang’s.

“It turned out to be an incredible opportunity,” Fujiyama told a roomful of women at UMW’s Stafford Campus, thanks to five words from the young man she sat down beside: “What’s bringing you joy lately?”

The question was pivotal for Fujiyama, now 34, who runs a Brooklyn-based consulting firm dedicated to bringing joy and emotional intelligence to the places people work and learn. She repeated the words on Thursday in her keynote address at the 26th annual Women’s Leadership Colloquium @ UMW.

Designed to foster the connectivity of professional women and inspire them toward a lifetime of leadership, the colloquium attracts managers, administrators, educators, business owners and representatives from the public and private sectors each year. Last Thursday’s event – brimming with breakout workshops; networking opportunities; and a colloquium-first, one-on-one career coaching sessions – revolved around the theme “Be Your Own Hero.” Read more.

Leadership Colloquium Challenges Women: ‘Be Your Own Hero’

At 25, Cosmo Fujiyama was at a crossroads, stalled between an internship and grad school. She’d had a long day at a professional conference, and she was feeling tired and drained. The last place she wanted to go was to a group dinner at P.F. Chang’s. “It turned out to be an incredible opportunity,” Fujiyama […]

Homecoming Recap and Sammy D. Eagle’s Reveal

The new Sammy D. Eagle

The new Sammy D. Eagle

Temperatures climbed to nearly 70 degrees under sunny, blue skies for UMW’s Homecoming last weekend. Spirited alumni flocked to the Battleground, where Eagles athletes – and sometimes @UMWAlumni– competed in matches of field hockey, rugby, soccer, volleyball and tennis. After more than three decades as UMW’s mascot, a new Sammy D. Eagle made his “beak-tastic” debut before the Friday night Mary Rock concert. And, #BackIntheBurg, Mary Washington alumni from various years enjoyed happy hour, tailgating and other festivities.

 

College Survey Ranks UMW Among Virginia’s Top Eight

The University of Mary Washington is among the top eight colleges and universities in Virginia, according to a new survey released this week by the personal finance website WalletHub. UMW’s strong statewide and overall finish means that it is among the nation’s top-performing schools with the lowest possible costs to undergraduates. Survey results, published in […]

College Survey Ranks UMW Among Virginia’s Top Eight

UMW was ranked eighth among Virginia colleges and universities in a survey of more than 1,000 institutions of higher education across the country by WalletHub.

UMW was ranked eighth among Virginia colleges and universities in a survey of more than 1,000 institutions of higher education across the country by WalletHub.

The University of Mary Washington is among the top eight colleges and universities in Virginia, according to a new survey released this week by the personal finance website WalletHub. UMW’s strong statewide and overall finish means that it is among the nation’s top-performing schools with the lowest possible costs to undergraduates.

Survey results, published in 2020’s Best College & University Rankings, compare more than 1,000 schools across the United States. The study measured performance in seven key areas – student selectivity, cost and financing, faculty resources, campus safety, campus experience, educational outcomes and career outcomes.

“Though success ultimately rests on students’ own determination and performance,” WalletHub states, “the quality of the schools they choose can certainly have an impact.”

Among institutions of higher education that made the survey’s Top Ten in Virginia – including the University of Virginia, the College of William and Mary, the University of Richmond, Virginia Tech and VMI – UMW ranked third in the “educational outcomes” category. Read more. 

College of Business Covers Bases With Alumni Honors

UMW alum Pat Filippone ’88, president of 7th Inning Stretch, which owns and operates three minor league baseball teams, was this year’s College of Business Executive-in-Residence. Photo by Karen Pearlman.

UMW alum Pat Filippone ’88, president of 7th Inning Stretch, which owns and operates three minor league baseball teams, was this year’s College of Business Executive-in-Residence. Photo by Karen Pearlman.

As a freshman at Mary Washington, Pat Filippone ’88 knew right off the bat what he wanted to do with his life – build a career in professional baseball. He just didn’t know how. Four years later all that had changed, he told a crowd last week at the Jepson Alumni Executive Center.

A bachelor’s degree in business administration, a well-rounded perspective from a liberal arts education, and an undergraduate career marked by personal attention from memorable professors, allowed him to hit a grand slam in his professional life. Now the president of 7th Inning Stretch, which owns and operates three minor league baseball teams, Filippone returned to campus last week as this year’s College of Business (COB) Executive-in-Residence.

The program, now in its 30th year, gives UMW students the opportunity to learn from and interact with established corporate leaders. Read more.

UMW Launches Centennial Celebration, ‘Farmer Legacy 2020’

For the University of Mary Washington, 2020 will be a particularly significant year. As civic engagement ramps up for the national election next November, UMW will celebrate several institutional milestones, including the 30th anniversary of the James Farmer Multicultural Center and the tenth anniversary of UMW’s Women’s and Gender Studies program.

UMW will honor the legacy of Dr. James Farmer, who taught at Mary Washington, during a yearlong celebration.

UMW will honor the legacy of Dr. James Farmer, who taught at Mary Washington, during a yearlong celebration.

And, in recognition of Dr. Farmer’s activism and determination to, in his own words, “do something about” injustice, Farmer Legacy 2020 will encourage the campus and surrounding community to take action in support of inclusive excellence. We will ask: What would Farmer fight for today? Moreover, January 12, 2020, will mark the centennial birthday of civil rights pioneer and UMW professor Dr. James Farmer. In commemoration, UMW will launch a year of reflection and a drive for action called Farmer Legacy 2020: A Centennial Celebration and Commitment to Action. With Farmer Legacy 2020, the University will focus on Dr. Farmer’s indelible imprint on U.S. history – and on UMW specifically. Through several signature events, Dr. Farmer’s influence and other social justice milestones will be celebrated.

As a boy in Marshall, Texas, James Farmer felt his heart “swell with rebellion” when he witnessed the injustices of Jim Crow. In 1942, 22-year-old Farmer co-founded the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), which organized several protests of segregated facilities in the 1940s and 1950s. CORE, under his leadership, led the 1961 Freedom Rides into several southern states, including Virginia, to test Supreme Court rulings that outlawed segregation in interstate transportation and bus terminals. After moving to Spotsylvania County in the early 1980s, Farmer served as Distinguished Professor of History at Mary Washington College from 1985 until his retirement in January 1999, shortly before his death later that year.

Earlier this week, a group of students, faculty, staff, alumni, and community members returned from a four-day replication of the original Freedom Rides Tour. This tour, organized and led by the University’s James Farmer Multicultural Center and Office of Equity and Access, included two buses and several faculty guides. The buses followed the route of the 1961 Freedom Rides and visited sites along the way, such as the International Civil Rights Center & Museum, the Anniston bus bombing, and the King Center for Nonviolent Social Change.

The Freedom Rides trip and other events this fall form a prelude to UMW’s yearlong celebration in 2020 of a Mary Washington icon and the values he exemplified. Community members are encouraged to join students in becoming a force for positive social change. Plan to visit the Farmer Legacy 2020 website throughout this year of commemoration to learn more about events and activities.