October 24, 2021

Bonds Discusses Human Rights on ‘With Good Reason’

Associate Professor of Sociology Eric Bonds

Associate Professor of Sociology Eric Bonds

Associate Professor of Sociology Eric Bonds will appear on the upcoming “With Good Reason” show Saturday, April 24 – Friday, April 29. With Good Reason airs Sundays at 2 p.m. on Fredericksburg’s Radio IQ 88.3 Digital and at various times throughout the week on stations across Virginia and the United States. Check the website for show times.

Protecting Human Rights (April 24, 2021)

Kirsten Gelsdorf (University of Virginia) has spent over 20 years working for the United Nations and other organizations in the humanitarian sector. She discusses her experience in disaster zones and clears up some commonly-held misconceptions about humanitarian aid. And: Earlier this year, Virginia became 1 of only 10 states to pass a Bill of Rights for domestic workers. But Jennifer Fish (Old Dominion University) says while it’s certainly a step in the write direction, these protections often exist only on paper. Jennifer has been named an Outstanding Faculty member by The State Council of Higher Education for Virginia.

Later in the show: According to the Guiness Book of World Records, The Universal Declaration of Human Rights is the most translated document in the world. But it’s not typically taught in American classrooms. Eric Bonds (University of Mary Washington) says we could learn a lot from studying the document and applying its moral framework to our own communities in the United States. Plus: Before the Cold War, UN peacekeeping missions were executed almost entirely by the United States and Great Britain. Now, developing countries have taken the lead in providing manpower to UN peacekeeping forces. Tim Passmore (Virginia Military Institute) says this may signal a larger shift in the global power structure.

Bonds Publishes Updated and Expanded Edition of Social Problems Text

Social Problems: A Human Rights PerspectiveEric Bonds recently published a second edition of his textbook, Social Problems: A Human Rights Approach with Routledge Press. The book uses an international human rights framework as a jumping-off place to teach students about power and inequality in U.S. society. This revised and expanded edition includes new chapters on human rights and immigration, climate change, and public health. It also includes new discussions on the COVID-19 pandemic and the #BlackLivesMatter movement.

Bonds Mentioned in FLS Article on Rt. 1 Name Change

Associate Professor of Sociology Eric Bonds was mentioned in an article on the Fredericksburg City Council’s resolution to change the name of Jefferson Davis Highway, a measure that was approved 6-1. The General Assembly will discuss the name change at a special session in August. History and American Studies Associate Professor Will Mackintosh has also been a driving force behind the current effort, Bonds said.

Bonds and two students in his political sociology class had asked City Council to make the change because of Davis’ role in the Civil War and the fact that he’d owned more than 100 slaves during his lifetime.

The request evolved out of Bonds’ desire for the students to do a community involvement project that would help them develop democracy skills and not simply vote in an election and then tune out. The class overwhelmingly voted on the renaming project, and researched Davis and the history of the naming of the highway after him. Read more.

Bonds, Students Speak at City Council Meeting on Highway Renaming

Associate Professor of Sociology Eric Bonds

Associate Professor of Sociology Eric Bonds and his students recently spoke at a Fredericksburg City Council meeting to discuss renaming the stretch of Route 1 that runs by the University of Mary Washington, according to an article in The Free Lance-Star.

The name, due to its associations with the Confederacy and slavery, has come under fire in several other localities in recent years. In 2016, UMW Assistant Professor of Sociology Eric Bonds and two students in his political sociology class asked City Council during one of its meetings to rename the highway because of Davis’ role in the Civil War and the fact that he’d owned more than 100 slaves during his lifetime.

The request evolved out of his desire for the students to do a community involvement project that would help them develop democracy skills and not simply vote in an election and then tune out. The class overwhelming voted on this project, and researched Davis and the history of the naming of the highway after him. Read more.

Fredericksburg council eyes support for renaming Jefferson Davis Highway (The Free Lance-Star)

COMMENTARY: Fredericksburg needs a climate change plan (The Free Lance-Star)

Bonds Co-authors Op-Ed on Climate Change for The Free Lance-Star

Associate Professor of Sociology Eric Bonds

Associate Professor of Sociology Eric Bonds and Rebecca Rubin, president and CEO of Marstel-Day, an environmental consulting firm, published an op-ed in The Free Lance-Star on what the Fredericksburg area can do to combat climate change:

 

Marstel-Day President and CEO Rebecca Rubin

Marstel-Day President and CEO Rebecca Rubin

YOU can regularly see it in the news reported in the Free Lance-Star and other newspapers: climate change is remaking our world. Fredericksburg urgently needs to develop a climate plan in response.

This effort should include a plan that would both reduce our city’s carbon emissions (which help propel global warming) and enable adaption to impacts that are inevitable—such as lethal heat, and air- and water-borne diseases—given that a certain amount of warming is already locked into our climate system.

Such a strategy would both respond to climate change risks and prevent them from worsening. Read more. 

Bonds Publishes Research Article on Civilian Impacts of Iraq War

Associate Professor of Sociology Eric Bonds

Eric Bonds, Associate Professor of Sociology, recently published an article in the journal Social Currents on the civilian impacts of U.S. military violence during the Iraq War. The article, entitled “Callous Cruelty and Counterinsurgency: Civilian Victimization and Compensation in U.S.-Occupied Iraq,” is based on an analysis of Iraqi requests for monetary payments after suffering losses of property and loved ones during the war. The files depict the routine nature of civilian harm in Iraq, and the most common ways by which U.S. military action killed civilians. Finally, the documents show that the U.S. military compensation program was administered in a way that frequently re-inscribed, rather than diminished, the callous cruelty of counterinsurgency war.

Bonds Publishes Article on Violence in Iraq and Syria

Eric Bonds, associate professor of sociology, published an article entitled “Humanitized Violence: Targeted Killings and Civilian Deaths in the U.S. War Against the Islamic State.”  The article draws upon a qualitative content analysis of human rights reports, newspaper accounts, and U.S. military statements to describe the ascendancy of “humanitized violence” as a form of brutality that utilizes precision weaponry, and that which is frequently critiqued on technical grounds of whether or not its use conforms to international humanitarian law, but not on questions of morality or ultimate efficacy.  The article is in Current Sociology, a publication of the International Sociological Association.

Free conference on carbon’s impact to be held at Fredericksburg library branch (The Free Lance-Star)