May 23, 2024

Biden clings to support among voters under 30: Harvard Youth poll (Courthouse News)

Farnsworth Lectures in Poland on U.S. Presidential Election

Professor of Political Science Stephen Farnsworth

Stephen Farnsworth, professor of Political Science and director of the University’s Center for Leadership and Media Studies, recently presented a lecture, “Policy Issues in the 2024 U.S. Presidential Election,” at Maria Curie Skłodowska University in Lublin, Poland. Dr. Farnsworth is serving as the Spring 2024 Fulbright Distinguished Scholar in the American Studies Program at the University of Warsaw.

‘Bipartisanship’ fizzles as General Assembly session ends (Chatham Star Tribune)

Another point of contention among lawmakers is establishing a regulated cannabis market. Democrats may have to wait for a new governor before making progress on cannabis, according to Stephen Farnsworth, a political science professor and director of the Center for Leadership and Media Studies at the University of Mary Washington. Read more.

Virginia lawmakers concerned Gov. Youngkin could scrap budget proposal amid declining bipartisanship (Loudoun Times)

Stephen Farnsworth, a professor of political science and international affairs at the University of Mary Washington, said he can’t recall any governor shooting down the entire budget. But he noted that bipartisanship is in decline.

“We really have seen a sort of downward trend in the ability of people in Richmond to work together across party lines,” he said. “A generation ago, moderates of both parties would have worked out a deal. Increasingly though, there aren’t that many moderates left.” Read more.

Congressional hopefuls are almost out of time to get their paperwork in (WVTF)

Stephen Farnsworth at the University of Mary Washington says they’ve got nothing to lose. “If you’re currently a member of the House of Delegates or the Senate of Virginia, you’re not on the same electoral timetable as a congressional race,” says Farnsworth. “So, you basically can get a roll of the dice without having to give anything up in terms of your own seat or not running for reelection because your contest would be in a different cycle in a different year.” Read more.

Virginia lawmakers concerned Gov. Youngkin could scrap budget proposal amid declining bipartisanship (The Virginian-Pilot)

Stephen Farnsworth, a professor of political science and international affairs at the University of Mary Washington, said he can’t recall any governor shooting down the entire budget. But he noted that bipartisanship is in decline.

“We really have seen a sort of downward trend in the ability of people in Richmond to work together across party lines,” he said. “A generation ago, moderates of both parties would have worked out a deal. Increasingly though, there aren’t that many moderates left.” Read more.

After vetoes, Youngkin’s budget “olive branch” unlikely to persuade Democrats (Virginia Dogwood)

Even as Youngkin struck a more conciliatory tone in budget talks with the General Assembly, “significant daylight” remains between the two sides, which have a history of contentious debate going back to the Youngkin’s first days in office, Stephen Farnsworth, a political science professor at the University of Mary Washington, said in an interview. “The governor has offered an olive branch, but it’s a relatively small olive branch,” Farnsworth said. “My guess is the Democrats are going to want more from what they’ve seen from the governor so far. Read more.

Jury Selection Resumes in Trump Trial (CTV News)

“We should be prepared for a long slog with this case. What you are seeing so far is the reality of a man who is intensely polarized in the United States,” said Stephen Farnsworth. Read more.

Virginia’s legislature hasn’t overridden a veto in more than a decade. Could that change Wednesday? (WVTF)

Professor Stephen Farnsworth with the University of Mary Washington said Youngkin may have miscalculated when he overturned the largely red and rural-backed effort. “The governor will face more severe threats of an overridden veto because of the way that he ignored Republican concerns,” Farnsworth told Radio IQ. Read more.

After vetoes, Youngkin’s budget “olive branch” unlikely to persuade Democrats (Virginia Dogwood)

Virginia lawmakers concerned Gov. Youngkin could scrap budget proposal amid declining bipartisanship (The Virginian-Pilot)

Virginia lawmakers concerned Gov. Youngkin could scrap budget proposal amid declining bipartisanship (Loudoun Times)

‘Bipartisanship’ fizzles as General Assembly session ends (Chatham Star Tribune)

Budget deadlines loom for Youngkin, Democrats (Dogwood)

Amid calls for Gaza ceasefire, Richmond City Council restricts public comment (VPN)

Farnsworth Lectures on Disinformation in Poland

Stephen Farnsworth, professor of Political Science and director of the University’s Center for Leadership and Media Studies, recently presented a lecture, “Disinformation, the News Media, and U.S. Presidential Elections,” at the University of Warsaw in Poland. The talk was derived from portions of Dr. Farnsworth’s recently published co-authored book, Producing News in a Time of Disinformation: Information Evaluation Strategies for Journalists and News Consumers. Dr. Farnsworth is serving in Poland as a Spring 2024 Fulbright Distinguished Scholar.

‘Bipartisanship’ fizzled in General Assembly this session

Another point of contention among lawmakers is establishing a regulated cannabis market. Democrats may have to wait for a new governor before making progress on cannabis, according to Stephen Farnsworth, a political science professor and director of the Center for Leadership and Media Studies at the University of Mary Washington. “This governor hasn’t shown much interest in coming up with a cannabis plan … and the Democrats in the legislature may very well wait it out for a subsequent governor’s cannabis plan,” Farnsworth said. Read more.

‘Bipartisanship’ fizzled in General Assembly this session

 

Although the North American economy is in good condition, this does not translate into support for Biden (Cronicas)

The fact that both have previously been heads of state is something quite peculiar. According to Stephen Farnsworth, a political scientist at the University of Mary Washington, this “levels the battleground quite a bit, because they both have experience campaigning for the presidency.” However, this has the downside that “it will be very difficult for campaigns to persuade new voters,” since “people already have a very clear idea of which candidate they prefer.” Read more.

 

‘Bipartisanship’ Fizzles as General Assembly Session Ends (Williamsburg Yorktown Daily)

Another point of contention among lawmakers is establishing a regulated cannabis market. Democrats may have to wait for a new governor before making progress on cannabis, according to Stephen Farnsworth, a political science professor and director of the Center for Leadership and Media Studies at the University of Mary Washington. “This governor hasn’t shown much interest in coming up with a cannabis plan … and the Democrats in the legislature may very well wait it out for a subsequent governor’s cannabis plan,” Farnsworth said.

‘Bipartisanship’ Fizzles as General Assembly Session Ends

 

These City Councils Are Changing Their Public Comment Rules as Gaza Ceasefire Debates Dominate (Next City)

Stephen Farnsworth, a political science professor at the University of Mary Washington, says the new restrictions highlight the “difficult balancing act” facing municipalities. “The bigger question for these cities is, do they really want to be making it more difficult for citizens to engage with elected officials?” Farnsworth says. “It’s a key measure to get a sense of the public’s pulse, so to speak, if you can have these vibrant comment periods.” Read more.

 

The unknown of Robert F. Kennedy Jr. to amplify his presidential campaign

“Third party candidates always perform better in the polls than on election day,” however, notes Stephen Farnsworth, professor of political science at the University of Mary Washington, contacted in Virginia. He assures in passing that the announcement of Ms. Shanahan’s candidacy should not change the dynamics of this race, which, like almost all elections in the United States, pits candidates from the two dominant parties against each other. “Voters like the idea of having more choice, but ultimately they almost always fear Democrats or Republicans enough to avoid voting for a third party,” he adds. People who don’t like Joe Biden and people who don’t like Donald Trump have such a strong feeling that they will do anything to make sure that the candidate they hate doesn’t win.” Read more.

 

Amid calls for Gaza ceasefire, Richmond City Council restricts public comment (VPN)

Stephen Farnsworth, a political science professor at the University of Mary Washington in Fredericksburg, told VPM News/Next City the new restrictions highlight the “difficult balancing act” facing municipalities. “The bigger question for these cities is, do they really want to be making it more difficult for citizens to engage with elected officials?” Farnsworth said. “It’s a key measure to get a sense of the public’s pulse, so to speak, if you can have these vibrant comment periods.” Read more.

he unknown of Robert F. Kennedy Jr. to amplify his presidential campaign (LeDevoir)