October 15, 2019

Hirshberg Presents at Brown University

Dan Hirshberg, assistant professor of religious studies and director of the contemplative studies program

Dan Hirshberg, assistant professor of religious studies and director of the contemplative studies program

Dan Hirshberg, assistant professor of religious studies and director of the contemplative studies program, offered a lecture and a workshop for Brown University’s Contemplative Studies Initiative.

His lecture focused on “Secular Rhetoric in Contemplative Pedagogy,” which concurred with recent critiques and advocated for pluralist discourse as representative of the field’s objectives and practices. The interactive workshop introduced some of the adverse effects of technology usage and featured the practice of an original contemplative exercise, “Smartphone Dis/Connect: FOMO,” which invites participants to explore the subtle physiological and psychological impacts of smartphone alerts and notifications.

Brown University launched the first Contemplative Studies concentration (major) for undergraduates in the world and is a leader in the interdisciplinary research of contemplation across the humanities, arts, and sciences.

Aminrazavi Publishes Article

Mehdi Aminrazavi, Professor of Philosophy and Religion and Co-Director of the Leidecker Center for Asian Studies

Mehdi Aminrazavi, Professor of Philosophy and Religion and Co-Director of the Leidecker Center for Asian Studies

Mehdi Aminrazavi, Professor of Philosophy and Religion and Co-Director of the Leidecker Center for Asian Studies, published an article in a peer reviewed journal, “Omar Khayyām on Theodicy: Irreconcilability of the Transcendental and the Imminent,” Journal of Islamic Philosophy, 11(2019): 33-44

Barry Publishes Article in Studies in Late Antiquity

Assistant Professor of Religious Studies Jennifer Barry

Assistant Professor of Religious Studies Jennifer Barry

Assistant Professor of Religious Studies Jennifer Barry published her latest article in the special issue on clerical exile in the peer-reviewed academic journal Studies in Late Antiquity. Her article, “Damning Nicomedia: The Spatial Consequences of Exile,” builds on work from her published monograph Bishops in Flight and incorporates material from the digital humanities Clerical Exile data base.

The article abstract is as follows:

All Christian flights were not created equal. With the aid of pro-Nicene authors, Athanasius of Alexandria’s multiple flights quickly became the standard for an orthodox exile. The charge of cowardice, or worse, heresy, was not so easily dismissed, however. While the famed Athanasius would explain away such charges in his own writings, as did many of his later defenders, not all fleeing bishops could escape a damning verdict. In this article, I explore how the enemies of Nicaea, re-read as the enemies of Athanasius, also found themselves in exile. Their episcopal flights were no testament to their virtue but within pro-Nicene Christian memory of fifth-century ecclesiastical historians, the exiles of anti-Nicene bishops, such as Eusebius of Nicomedia, were remembered as evidence of guilt. To show how this memory-making exercise took place we will turn to the imperial landscape and assess how the space someone was exiled from greatly shaped how exile was deemed either orthodox or heretical. 

Romero Contributes Essay to Volume on Ancient Greek Epigram

Professor of Classics, Philosophy and Religion Joe Romero Contributes Essay to Volume on Ancient Greek Epigram

Professor of Classics, Philosophy and Religion Joe Romero Contributes Essay to Volume on Ancient Greek Epigram

Professor of Classics, Philosophy and Religion Joe Romero (CPRD) has contributed an essay, “‘From atop a lofty wall’ Philosophers and Philosophy in Greek Literary Epigram,” edited by Maria Kanellou, Ivana Petrovic, and Chris Carey and published by Oxford University Press in a volume entitled Greek Epigram from the Hellenistic to the Early Byzantine Era (2019) pp. 288-304.

Barry Publishes Monograph Bishops in Flight

Assistant Professor of Religious Studies Jennifer Barry

Assistant Professor of Religious Studies Jennifer Barry

Assistant Professor of Religious Studies Jennifer Barry published her first monograph, Bishops in Flight: Exile and Displacement in Late Antiquity, with the University of California Press.

A free open access ebook is available upon publication. Learn more at www.luminosoa.org.

Book Abstract:
Flight during times of persecution has a long and fraught history in early Christianity. In the third century, bishops who fled were considered cowards or, worse yet, heretics. On the face, flight meant denial of Christ and thus betrayal of faith and community. But by the fourth century, the terms of persecution changed as Christianity became the favored cult of the Roman Empire. Prominent Christians who fled and survived became founders and influencers of Christianity over time.

Bishops in Flight examines the various ways these episcopal leaders both appealed to and altered the discourse of Christian flight to defend their status as purveyors of Christian truth, even when their exiles appeared to condemn them. Their stories illuminate how profoundly Christian authors deployed theological discourse and the rhetoric of heresy to respond to the phenomenal political instability of the fourth and fifth centuries.

Mathews Presents Paper at Harvard University Symposium

Professor of Religious Studies Mary Beth Mathews

Professor of Religious Studies Mary Beth Mathews

Professor of Religious Studies Mary Beth Mathews presented an invited paper, “Doctrine, Race, and Education: The American Baptist Theological Seminary and Jim Crow,” at Harvard University’s Symposium on Religion and Public Life in Africa and the Americas, sponsored by the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs. She argued that African American theological seminaries in the American South are a neglected but necessary avenue for understanding how African American evangelicals negotiated racial barriers to education and constructed autonomous spaces for theological development.

Vasey To Give Religious Freedom Address

Craig Vasey

Craig Vasey

Craig Vasey, Chair of the Department of Classics, Philosophy, and Religion and Professor of Philosophy, will give the keynote address, “Civil Rights and Religious Opinions” at the Knights of Columbus annual Religious Freedom Day celebration on Sunday, Jan. 14 at the Religious Freedom Monument on Washington Avenue.

Hirshberg Presents Paper at International Conference

Dan Hirshberg, assistant professor of religion, presented new research at the International Association for Tibetan Studies conference, held at the University of Bergen (Norway), June 19–25, 2016. His paper traced the introduction and evolution of the many names of Padmasambhava, an eighth-century tantrika credited with establishing Buddhism in Tibet, which became signposts in the retelling of his biography as well as the foci of countless ritual and devotional liturgies.

Vasey Co-Writes Journal Article

Craig Vasey and Linda Carroll wrote an article titled “How Do We Evaluate Teaching?” in the May-June issue of Academe, a publication of the American Association of University Professors.

Vasey is professor of philosophy and chair of the Department of Classics, Philosophy and Religion. He is a former member of the AAUP’s national council and current chair of the Committee on Teaching, Research and Publication. Linda Carroll is professor of Italian at Tulane University and a member of the AAUP’s Executive Committee.

https://www.aaup.org/article/how-do-we-evaluate-teaching#.V1hIkrerRD8

 

Scanning Through History

Students relive the past using 3-D technology.