October 1, 2020

Business Services eUpdate–Fall 2020

Business Services Logo

Business Services: Open for Business

In keeping with UMW’s Return to Campus Plan, all offices are exercising MMDC requirements: monitoring, masking, distancing, and cleaning. Services are available online as well as in person by appointment. Read on to see how Business Services is serving you.


Bookstore

Shop now for 25% off select merchandise!

The Bookstore is open during the following times, with a maximum capacity of 10 shoppers at a time:

  • Monday-Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m
  • Saturday: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The University Bookstore has an assortment of hand sanitizers and masks for sale. You can also shop the Bookstore website 24/7 for your course material and UMW spiritwear needs.

Branded UMW Face Mask


Copy Center

The Copy Center remains open during normal business hours. Patrons are encouraged to submit jobs online whenever possible and request delivery through campus mail. Due to space limitations inside the Copy Center admittance is only one person at a time, and only with an appointment. To make an appointment send an email to copies@umw.edu or call (540) 654-1935.


EagleOne

The EagleOne Card Center is open during regular business hours for in person visits by appointment only. Appointments may be scheduled through an online request form: https://adminfinance.umw.edu/eagleone/for-students/service-appointment/ or by calling x1005. EagleOne funds may be deposited online through Transact.

Off-Campus Merchants

Off-Campus merchant partners accept the EagleOne card as payment. Visit the EagleOne website to see the list of active partners.


Parking Management

Students, faculty, and staff may still order 2020/2021 decals through the Parking Management portal and receive their decals through Campus Mail. In person appointments can be scheduled by calling (540) 654-1129.


Post Office

The UMW Post Office will continue to deliver mail to one location per building. Contact the Post Office at (540) 654-1049 or email umwpo@umw.edu for information or questions regarding mail delivery. To visit the Post Office, follow the MMDC requirements and instructions on the website.

Temporary Price Increase

USPS has announced a temporary rate increase that will be in effect October 18, 2020 through December 31, 2020. Priority Mail will increase to $7.42; Parcel Ground will increase to $7.32 and Priority Express will increase to $24.25. Please plan accordingly for these changes. As always, the UMW PO staff will rate shop for you and give you the best options when sending out any mail. Questions? Please call (540) 654-1049 or email at umwpo@umw.edu.

Changes to MyTime Approval Deadlines for Full-Time Employees

MyTime Supervisors and Employees,

Effective with the 8/10/20-8/24/20 pay period, MyTime timecard approvals for fulltime employees and their supervisors will change from a two-day review/approval period to a one-day review/approval period. The State’s upcoming implementation of new payroll and human resources software necessitate changes to our MyTime approval deadlines.

Approval deadlines for administrative faculty and classified employees will be earlier. Effective 8/24/20, administrative faculty and classified employees must approve their own timecards by  NOON the day after the pay period ends. Supervisors of these employees must approve their employees’ timecards by 5pm the day after the pay period ends.. The pay periods end the 9th and the 24th of each month. If the day after the pay period end falls on a weekend or holiday, the employee’s approval is due noon on the next business day and the supervisor’s approval is due by 5pm the next business day. The semi-monthly pay period calendar on the UMW Payroll website reflects the new timecard approval deadlines.

 

Approval Deadlines for classified and administrative faculty

Pay Period 8/10-8/24/20, EMPLOYEE approval due no later than 12 noon, Tuesday, 8/25/2020

Pay Period 8/10-8/24/20, SUPERVISOR approval due no later than 5pm, Tuesday, 8/25/2020

 

MyTime reminder email notifications have been updated to support the new approval deadlines.

Timecards and leave requests must be completed and approved by the deadline to ensure accuracy of leave and time records and for timely payment of overtime.

Questions concerning this communication may be sent to Payroll@UMW.edu. MyTime instructional materials are located on the Payroll website.

President Paino’s All-University Address

The following message is from the Office of the President.

As is his tradition, President Paino will launch the upcoming semester with an all-University address on Monday, August 17, from 9 to 10 a.m. This session, however, will not be in Dodd Auditorium; it will be via your computer screen. Please plan to access the live address via Zoom or YouTube. Neither platform requires registration, and the YouTube recording will be available afterward for those unable to join Monday morning.

Erchull, Liss Win Award for ‘Psychology of Women and Gender’ Textbook

Professor of Psychological Science Miriam Liss

Professor of Psychological Science Mindy Erchull

Professor of Psychological Science Mindy Erchull

Professors of Psychological Science Mindy Erchull and Miriam Liss, along with co-author Kate Richmond, won the 2020 Distinguished Publication Award from the Association for Women in Psychology for their textbook published last year by Norton: Psychology of Women and Gender.

The Distinguished Publication Award is given in recognition of significant and substantial contributions of research and theory that advance our understanding of the psychology of women and promote achievement of the goals of the Association for Women in Psychology (AWP). Every year since 1977, AWP has given one or more awards for books and/or articles published the prior year that make a significant contribution to feminist psychology. The book by Erchull, Liss and Richmond is the most recent in a body of distinguished publications to merit such an honor. The authors have also been invited to present an award address at the 2021 virtual AWP conference. Learn more about the award here:  https://www.awpsych.org/distinguished_publication.php.

A message from President Paino about the start of on-campus instruction

A message from President Troy Paino:

 

To our faculty and staff,

Like you, I have been closely following recent trends with the COVID-19 virus. It goes without saying that the increase in the number of cases in Virginia and across the country gives us pause. We had hoped and believed, just a month ago, that we were headed in the right direction. However, after careful study of the most recent data, a thorough discussion of our options with the COVID-19 Implementation Team, consultation with our local public health and health care officials, and deliberation with my senior leadership team, we have made the decision to delay move-in and the start of on-campus instruction.

This means that we now aim for the following:

  • All classes will still begin on Monday, August 24, but in-person and hybrid courses will be conducted remotely for the first three weeks.
  • Residential students will return to campus by Monday, September 14 (move-in will take place September 10-13).
  • Classes on September 10 and 11 will be cancelled to support residential student move-in.
  • Residential students will still return home on Friday, November 20.
  • As previously announced, classes will resume remotely on Monday, November 30, and the semester will conclude with exams the week of December 7.

What has caused us to adjust our plans? Since we completed our plan – #ForwardUMWand shared it with you at the beginning of July, the pandemic’s impact has worsened, both here in Virginia and around the country. The number of daily cases has gone up, as have hospitalizations and test positivity rates. We remain fortunate that our region (the Rappahannock Health District) has not witnessed the increases in cases and hospitalizations that are cause for alarm in other areas of our commonwealth. In addition, our health care partner, Mary Washington Hospital, continues to report that the demand remains low for intensive care beds – a key measure of hospital surge capacity. Nonetheless, we have observed that both here and nationally the availability of tests has tightened, while the return time on results has lengthened. Both of these conditions – trends in public health and the ability to test adequately – are critical to our ability to return fully to campus this fall. Today’s announcement provides a little more time to monitor and evaluate these conditions.

You might be asking, “why shouldn’t we just move the entire semester online at this point?” I understand this perspective. It would be an easier way forward and would provide the certainty that we would prefer to plan our courses, organize our labs, and design our assignments. It is not, at this time, the right approach for our students. Deciding prematurely to forego an on-campus experience for our students would deny them a critical opportunity for growth and development that is optimized through the residential experience. We have invested significantly and developed substantive engagement opportunities at every level of the institution this fall. Therefore, we need to extend, as much as possible, the chance for our students to have an experience that we all recognize as transformational.

To move forward, I have asked Provost Mikhalevsky, to work with the college deans and the leadership of faculty governance to recommend any adjustments to the academic calendar that this delay may require. I expect that those decisions will be made by the end of this week and shared with you as soon as they are final.

I know that for our faculty members who had planned to start their classes in-person, whether face-to-face or hybrid, this is difficult news. While our decision to start with remote learning is not something any of us were seeking, I know that your preparation and talents in the classroom will translate to our students,  regardless of modality. I am well aware of how much we have asked of you these past few months and am so very grateful for your continued dedication and commitment to our students.

And to our staff, who have been working so diligently to provide for an outstanding student experience, irrespective of whether our students are on campus or at home, I know that this is also disappointing news. However, I am confident that your efforts to engage and support students through advising, counseling, activities or events will be realized in new and different ways.

We are all here to welcome our students to the fall semester, regardless of modality or on-campus start date. We know that our students are eager to join us. We also know that their desire for residential living, despite the circumstances, remains high. We will do everything we possibly can to see that this is possible in what will now be a more compact on-campus experience. We do this because we know that residential living provides opportunities for growth, discovery, and personal development that cannot be realized in any other way.

Finally, I would be remiss if I did not acknowledge again what I have said previously, this pandemic has put us – along with our colleagues in higher education across the state and around the nation – in a precarious financial situation. This decision, made in the interest of public health, is the right one for us despite the fiscal challenges that it presents. Difficult decisions often don’t offer simple solutions.

We will continue to provide updates to keep you informed and are planning Q&A sessions with both faculty and staff, as well as students and their families, next week. In addition, we have focused on Tuesday, September 1, as a date to provide further updates about the fall semester.

So many have done so much in support of our return to campus this August, and we have done everything in our control to make this possible. And though we cannot foresee the future, we will continue to adapt and respond as new information is available. While this virus has repeatedly demonstrated that it doesn’t care about our best laid plans, I am confident that the strength of our community will prove resilient and ready.

 

Troy

August 2020 Staff Advisory Council Newsletter

Happy August, UMW!

We hope you enjoy this month’s newsletter from the Staff Advisory Council. If you click on the newsletter image below, you will be brought to an interactive PDF where you can zoom in and click on relevant links. There is also an accessible text version available on the Staff Advisory Council’s new website.

As always, if you have any thoughts or concerns you would like to bring to the S.A.C., you can find our contact information in the newsletter. Never hesitate to reach out! Stay well.

Best,
UMW Staff Advisory Council

Arin Doerfler
Beth Williams (ex-officio)
Brian Ogle
Brittanie Naff
Cecelia “Cece” Burkett
Charles Tate
Christy Pack
Clint Often
Cris Lopes
Edward Gray
Betsy Southern
James Pape
Julie Smith
Justin Wilkes
Kim McManus-Carini
Lee Roy Johnson
Maria Schultz
Maureen Aylward
Michael Morley
Michelle Pickham
Pam Lowery
Rosemarie Staggs
Ryan Hastings

NEW Staff Advisory Council Website

The Staff Advisory Council has a new website: https://in.umw.edu/sac/. The website contains a list of SAC members, so please reach out to an SAC representative or use the Contact Us form if you have a question or concern.

Crawley Announces Great Presidential Lives Online Series

Professor Emeritus of History William B. Crawley offered commentary in The Free Lance-Star on Founding Father and America’s third president Thomas Jefferson in advance of the Great Presidential Lives series, which launched on Aug. 11. The online series will be available at https://www.umw.edu/greatlives/.

Dr. Crawley also appeared on “Town Talk” with Ted Schubel on 1230AM/WFVA: https://www.newstalk1230.net/episode/bill-crawley-great/

 

FLS Commentary: IN RECENT years, as biographers have reinterpreted the lives of significant historical figures, there has been a tendency toward denigrating the reputations of a number of previously hallowed individuals.

In this process—referred to, sometimes derisively, as “revisionism”—perhaps no figure in American history has suffered a greater decline in stature than Thomas Jefferson.

To be sure, the third president had enemies in his own times, including one who ineloquently referred to him as a “son of a bitch” and a “red-headed rascal.” Others, in contrast, revered him as the “Sage of Monticello,” emphasizing his immortal precept that “all men are created equal.”

In a letter to James Madison dated Feb. 17, 1826, Jefferson implored his friend and presidential successor to “take care of me when dead.” He need not have worried, at least for his immediate posterity.

Indeed, for more than a century following his July 4, 1826, death, the preponderance of historical opinion—either diminishing or ignoring altogether his involvement with slavery and his racist views—was so uniformly in Jefferson’s favor that one historian, writing in the 1940s, declared that “the enemies of Thomas Jefferson are all dead or else are in hiding.”

But with the coming of the civil rights movement in the 1950s and 60s, biographers began to focus increasingly on his personal life, which presaged the end of Jefferson’s secular sainthood. One critic pointed out the irony that “the leisure that made possible Jefferson’s great writings on human liberty was supported by the labors of three generations of slaves.” Read more.

View the first Great President Lives video here: https://www.umw.edu/greatlives/lecture/thomas-jefferson/.

REMINDER: Be sure and take the COVID-19 training ASAP

The following message is from the COVID-19 Implementation Team.

To all faculty and staff:

As a first step in our we-are-all-in-this-together approach to reopening, we are requiring every member of our community to complete a COVID-19 training module and sign-off on the Mary Washington Pledge. Employees must complete the MMDC training BEFORE they come to campus and no later than August 18, whichever comes first. Also, you will note in the training that all UMW employees are required to submit a health attestation every work day. Many thanks to employees who have completed the training and are faithfully completing the Eagle Health form each day.

To access the COVID training:

  1. Please use Firefox or Chrome to access this training.
  2. Login to the Learning Center https://covlc.virginia.gov using your Learning Center credentials. These credentials may not be the same as your UMW  credentials; to reset your login ID or password use the forgot your login ID or password option to reset either or both.
  3. Enter UMWCOVID in the Search box (magnifying glass in the upper right).
  4. Open the item: UMW COVID Training.
  5. There are 3 required items; they must be reviewed in the order listed. Click on each item and then click on Access Item.

-UMW Return to Campus – Watch the video, then mark the item complete.
Click UMW COVID Training in the Search Results box at the top to return to main training page.

-#ForwardUMW – Read the content in the presentation, then mark the item complete.

Click UMW COVID Training in the Search Results box at the top to return to main training page. If you click on one of the links, when done   with the link close it and click on the #ForwardUMW to return to the training.

-UMW Eagle Pledge – Read the Eagle Pledge, then mark the item complete. Doing so indicates that you have read the document and will comply.

If you need assistance logging into the Learning Center, please reach out to Pam Lowery (plowery@umw.edu).

Landphair Pens Column on John Lewis in Richmond Times-Dispatch

Vice President of Student Affairs Juliette Landphair

Vice President of Student Affairs Juliette Landphair

Vice President of Student Affairs Juliette Landphair, who is the Farmer Legacy 2020 co-chair, penned a column in The Richmond Times-Dispatch on the late Rep. John Lewis’ legacy and the impact that he and Dr. James L. Farmer Jr. have had on the University of Mary Washington and its students.

Sixty years ago, much like today, many American young adults were on fire to dismantle racial discrimination. U.S. Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., who recently passed away as an international icon for civil rights and public service, was one of them. Born in 1940 into a tenant farming family in Pike County, Ala., where half of their cotton crop’s earnings went to the white landowner, Lewis grew up in a poor, rural part of the nation completely alien from stereotypical recollections of 1950s consumerism and suburbanization. As historian Dr. Andrew Lewis recalls, John Lewis’ childhood “conjures up a world that the twentieth century seemed to have passed by.”

While in college at American Baptist Theological Seminary in Nashville, Tenn., Lewis became active in civil rights protest. Over a few critical months in late 1959 and early 1960, he and other young activists, including the extraordinary (and not enough remembered) Diane Nash, attended workshops on nonviolence and its philosophical roots, taught by the minister James Lawson. Principles such as the power of the collective and the redemptive community settled into Lewis’ conscience and remained the rest of his life; he later described “crossing over” into a lifelong commitment to the movement in 1960 while participating in the Nashville sit-ins.

At my institution, the University of Mary Washington (UMW), Lewis figures prominently in our story. We like to think it is a special bond, but of course, Lewis made all admirers feel important. In 1961, Dr. James Farmer, leader of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), who later became a Mary Washington College professor, helped recruit the 21-year-old Lewis to join 12 others on the Freedom Rides. They would travel on two buses through several Southern states challenging interstate transportation facilities. During the Rides, Lewis was attacked by angry whites in South Carolina and Alabama.

More recently, Lewis agreed to serve as honorary chair of Farmer Legacy 2020, UMW’s yearlong celebration of the 100th anniversary of his friend Dr. Farmer’s birth. This past November, in his official acceptance of his chairperson role, Lewis met with a small UMW delegation in his Capitol Hill office for nearly an hour. I was fortunate to be among the attendees. With his celebrated warmth and humility, he spent nearly an hour with us, asking about UMW and our lives, and sharing stories. He especially was attentive to Jason Ford, our Student Government Association president who, as a black man himself, knew he was in the presence of a giant on whose shoulders he stood. Read more.