December 2, 2021

Barrenechea Publishes Essay in Collection

Professor of English Antonio Barrenechea

Professor of English Antonio Barrenechea

Antonio Barrenechea, Professor of English, recently published “A Hemispheric World of Differences: Literature of the Americas, 1982-2000,” the lead essay in the collection Essays in Honor of Lois Parkinson Zamora: From the Americas to the World, edited by Monika Kaup and John Ochoa and issued from Lexington Books.

Levy Publishes Two Stories, Releases Issue 22 of Literary Magazine

 

Assistant Professor of English Ray Levy

Assistant Professor of English Ray Levy

Ray Levy, Assistant Professor of English, recently published the short story “Autobiographical Animal” in Anomaly (https://anmly.org/ap33/ray-levy-2/) and the short story “The Use of Pleasure” in Territory (http://themapisnot.com/issue-13-ray-levy). In addition, they released Issue Twenty-Two of their literary magazine, Dreginald, this week (http://dreginald.com/index.php/issues/issue-twenty-two).

Barrenechea Publishes Essay in Flagship Melville Journal

Professor of English Antonio Barrenechea

Professor of English Antonio Barrenechea

Antonio Barrenechea, Professor of English, recently published “The Jungle and the Whale: Vortices of Nation in Moby-Dick and La vorágine” in Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies, the flagship Melville journal.

Bylenok Announced as Winner of 2021 Backwaters Press Prize in Poetry

Assistant Professor of English Laura Bylenok

Assistant Professor of English Laura Bylenok

Laura Bylenok, assistant professor of English and current coordinator of the creative writing program, has just been announced by the University of Nebraska Press as the winner of the Backwaters Press Prize in Poetry for 2021. The book based on her manuscript Living Room will be published in the fall of 2022. For details, see: https://unpblog.com/…/announcing-the-backwaters-prize…/

Dasgupta Presents on the Indian Partition at Two Conferences

Associate Professor of English Shumona Dasgupta

Associate Professor of English Shumona Dasgupta

Associate Professor of English Shumona Dasgupta recently presented on representations of the Indian partition at two professional conferences.

She presented “Subaltern Pasts: Other Archives of the Indian Partition (1947)” at the thirtieth annual British Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies conference (BCPSC) hosted by the Georgia Southern University, GA (February 15-19, 2021) and held as a virtual conference.

She also presented “A Geography of Crisis: Memorializing the Partition (1947) in Indian Cinema” at the fifth annual Memory Studies Conference (MSA) hosted by the University of Warsaw, Poland (July 5-9, 2021), rescheduled from 2020, and held as a virtual conference.

Richards Presents at Faulkner and Yoknaptawpha Conference

Professor of English Gary Richards

Professor of English Gary Richards

Gary Richards, Professor of English, presented the paper “Circling New Orleans: Faulkner’s Mosquitoes and Welty’s ‘No Place for You, My Love'” on the “Remapping Southern Geographies” panel at the 47th annual Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference held digitally July 18-21, 2021. This year’s conference, titled “Faulkner, Welty, Wright: A Mississippi Confluence,” put writer William Faulkner in dialogue with fellow twentieth-century Mississippi writers Eudora Welty and Richard Wright.

UMW Linguistics Alum Sylvia Sierra ’09 to Release ‘Millennials Talking Media’

From Professor and Chair of the Department of English and Linguistics Gary Richards:

2009 UMW alumna Sylvia Sierra is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication and Rhetorical Studies at Syracuse University

2009 UMW alumna Sylvia Sierra is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication and Rhetorical Studies at Syracuse University

Congratulations to alumna Sylvia Sierra ’09! She has written the book Millennials Talking Media: Creating Intertextual Identities in Everyday Conversation, scheduled for release from Oxford University Press in September 2021.

Sierra is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Communication and Rhetorical Studies at Syracuse University. She completed her Ph.D. in the Department of Linguistics at Georgetown University in 2016. Previously, she received a B.A. in Linguistics and Spanish from the University of Mary Washington where she graduated summa cum laude, and worked as a Fulbright English Teaching Assistant at the Instituto Tecnológico de Jiquilpan in Michoacán, Mexico and then as a Prince William County Spanish teacher in Virginia. She also holds a Master of Education (M.Ed.) in Teaching English as a Second Language from UMW and an M.S. in linguistics from Georgetown.
In the new book, Sierra analyzes how millennial friends make intertextual media references (to film, TV shows, books, songs, video games, and internet memes) in their everyday talk for specific interactional functions.
Millennials Talking Media Book Cover“This book examines how a group of U.S. Millennial friends in their late twenties embed both old media (books, songs, films, TV shows) and new media (YouTube videos, video games, and internet memes) in their everyday talk for particular interactional purposes. Multiple case studies are presented featuring the recorded talk of Millennial friends to demonstrate how and why these speakers make media references in their conversations. These recorded conversations are supplemented with participant playback interviews, along with ethnographic field notes. The analysis demonstrates how the speakers phonetically signal media references in the speech stream, how they demonstrate appreciation of the references in their listening behaviors, and how they ultimately use media references for epistemic, framing, and identity construction purposes, often (but not always) when faced with epistemic, or knowledge, imbalances as well as interactional dilemmas, or awkward moments in interaction. The analysis shows how such references contribute to epistemic management and frame shifts in conversation, which is ultimately conducive to different forms of Millennial identity construction. Additionally, this book explores the stereotypes embedded in the media that these Millennials quote, and examines the effects of reproducing those stereotypes in everyday social life. This book explores how the boundaries between screens, online and offline life, language, and identity are porous for Millennials, and weaves together the most current linguistic theories regarding knowledge, framing, and identity work in everyday interaction, illuminating the interplay between these processes.”
For more on the book and Sierra, see https://www.facebook.com/millennialstalkingmedia and sylviasierra.com as well as: instagram @millennialstalkingmedia, twitter @milltalkmedia, and tiktok @millennialstalkingmedia.

Richards Presents at Tennessee Williams/New Orleans Literary Festival

Professor and Chair of English Gary Richards

Professor and Chair of English Gary Richards

Gary Richards, Professor of English, recently led the Books and Beignets discussion of Tennessee Williams’s The Rose Tattoo at the Tennessee Williams/New Orleans Literary Festival, held virtually March 24-28, 2021. The discussion marked the seventieth anniversary of The Rose Tattoo‘s Broadway opening as well as Richards’s fifteenth year of leading this annual event.

McAllister Publishes Article, Book Review

Professor of English Marie McAllister

Professor of English Marie McAllister

Marie McAllister, Professor of English, recently published “Rhetoric, the Pox, and the Grand Tour,” which appeared as the lead article in the April 2021 issue of Eighteenth-Century Life.

McAllister also recently published a review of Itch, Clap, Pox: Venereal Disease in the Eighteenth-Century Imagination, by Noelle Gallagher, in Journal of the History of Sexuality.

Barrenechea Presents at American Comparative Literature Association

Professor of English Antonio Barrenechea

Professor of English Antonio Barrenechea

Antonio Barrenechea, Professor of English, recently presented the paper “A Hemispheric World of Differences: Luis Alberto Sánchez and Stanley T. Williams” at the meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association, which took place virtually this year.