April 14, 2021

If You Can’t Stand the Cheat, Get Out of the Kitchen (Forbes)

Rettinger Quoted in Forbes Article

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger, who is also director of UMW’s Academic Integrity Programs, was quoted in a Forbes.com article entitled “If You Can’t Stand the Cheat, Get Out of the Kitchen.”

As David Rettinger of University of Mary Washington noted on The Key, “If you’re going to give a 50 question multiple choice test, that’s pretty much the most cheatable possible assignment online. Even if you just change that to 10 five-question multiple choice quizzes, you’ve made it less likely that students will cheat, because you’ve reduced the stakes and the pressure.” Read more.

Rettinger Comments on Cheating During Remote Learning in Teen Vogue

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger, who is also the director of Academic Integrity at UMW, recently contributed to a Teen Vogue article about remote learning and the rise of cheating.

“I call it a game of whack-a-mole,” says David Rettinger, president emeritus of the International Center for Academic Integrity (ICAI) and director of academic integrity at the University of Mary Washington. New sites are constantly rising in popularity, he explains, making it harder for professors to prevent students from seeking answers online, especially now. Read more.

Dr. Rettinger also offered comments on the West Point cheating scandal:

West Point Honor Code Under Scrutiny as the Military Academy Grapples with Another Cheating Scandal (WSHU)

Most of the West Point Cadets Who Cheated on A Virtual Exam Will Be Allowed to Remain Enrolled (WVIK)

Remote Learning and Cheating: Professors and Students Weigh In (Teen Vogue)

Rettinger Appears on Inside Higher Ed Podcast

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger was a guest on Inside Higher Ed’s The Key podcast. Rettinger, who is the director of academic integrity programs at UMW and president emeritus of the International Center for Academic Integrity, discussed issues of cheating, test proctoring tools and academic misconduct.

Combating Cheating in the COVID Era: The Key Podcast (Inside Higher Education)

Rettinger Comments in New York Times

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger, who is also Director of Academic Integrity Programs at UMW, offered comments for a New York Times article entitled, “Backlash Over Leniency at West Point After 73 Cadets Are Accused of Cheating.”

“It’s a complex tug of war,” he said. “You have emerging adults who genuinely want to serve their country at the highest levels. It’s heartfelt and honorable. Some may say to themselves, ‘Am I going to allow calculus to be the thing that keeps me from being the patriot I am?’ or, ‘Am I going to let the fellow cadet fall behind?’ From that point of view, they don’t necessarily see cheating as an unalloyed bad thing.” Read more.

Backlash Over Leniency at West Point After 73 Cadets Are Accused of Cheating (The New York Times)

Professors say students cheated using Chegg, following MATH 100 cheating incident (The Ubyssey)

Rettinger Comments on Cheating Incident at Canadian University

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger, who is director of Academic Integrity Programs at UMW, offered comments to The Ubyssey for an article on a cheating incident that occurred at the University of British Columbia-Okanagan, in which students used the homework-sharing site Chegg to answer questions on a final exam.

While cheating may have increased during the pandemic, there isn’t any hard data to prove that yet, David Rettinger, a professor of psychology and director of academic integrity programs at the University of Mary Washington told Chronicle of Higher Education in October. At UBC, no such data is available. Read more.