October 1, 2020

Rettinger Comments on Cheating in Online Courses

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger, who is also Director of Academic Integrity Programs at UMW, commented in an Inside Higher Ed article entitled, “Best Way to Stop Cheating in Online Courses? ‘Teach Better’.”

“Ever since the first monks were saying, ‘Oh, those new styluses are allowing them to illuminate those manuscripts much more easily, that’s clearly dishonest,’ there’s been somebody who thought the new technology makes [cheating] so much easier,” David Rettinger, a professor of psychological science and director of academic programs at the University of Mary Washington, said during the Wiley webcast. “The reality is that there has always been people using technology for good and for ill. I don’t think the internet is an epochal technological change — it’s just another in a series of the wheel turning.” Read more.

Best Way to Stop Cheating in Online Courses? ‘Teach Better’ (Inside Higher Ed)

Rettinger Comments on Course Hero in Chronicle of Higher Ed Article

Associate Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger

Associate Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger

David Rettinger, Associate Professor of Psychological Science and Director of UMW’s Academic Programs, recently commented on an article in The Chronicle of Higher Education on Course Hero, an educational technology company that recently saw its value top $1 billion. The website allows students and faculty to share syllabi and other academic resources online.

Higher education is evolving “to be more collaborative and dynamic and less lecture/exam/research paper-based,” Rettinger adds. And when that happens, he says, “technology and pedagogy will come together in ways that really benefit students.”

Right now, though, “there’s a very serious gap between those things, and in my experience, faculty in the U.S. are largely naïve and unaware of the tremendous problem that technology is creating for contract cheating and file sharing.”

Rettinger’s other relevant role: president of the International Center for Academic Integrity.

He goes out of his way to say that he isn’t anti-technology, and he says he believes “there’s certainly a lot of legitimate learning that goes on on Course Hero” and other sites. (He acknowledges that his daughter, an elementary school student, “uses Quizlet all the time” to find extra problems to drill on.)

The philosophical premise behind sharing websites like Course Hero — and behind getting a higher education, for that matter — is that “there’s some pedagogical learning value that comes out” of exploring the educational materials you might find on such sites, Rettinger says. Read more.

Course Hero Woos Professors (Inside Higher Ed)

Students are still using tech to cheat on exams, but things are getting more advanced (Phys.org)

Rettinger Comments on Cheating in Higher Ed in USA Today

David Rettinger, associate professor of Psychological Science

David Rettinger, associate professor of Psychological Science

David Rettinger, associate professor of psychological science and director of academic programs at the University of Mary Washington, was recently interviewed by USA Today in an article titled, “Students are still using tech to cheat on exams, but things are getting more advanced.” “Technology presents new ways for students to do things that they’ve always been doing, which is avoid doing the work themselves,” said Rettinger, president of the International Center for Academic Integrity. “Forever, students would go to a book and copy things for a paper. Copy and paste plagiarism is as old as reading and writing, but now it’s so much easier. You don’t even have to leave your desk to do that. The bar has gotten much lower.” Read more. 

 

Rettinger Quoted in Article on Plagiarism

David Rettinger, associate professor of Psychological Science

David Rettinger, associate professor of Psychological Science

Associate Professor of Psychology David Rettinger was quoted in an article on the ethics of plagiarism. “It’s a particular problem in academia because we care so much about the process,” says Rettinger, who is also the president of the International Center for Academic Integrity and director of Academic Integrity Programs at UMW. “I say this to my students all the time: I don’t care that you give me a [clean] paper. I care that you write a paper. The point is … it’s like sending someone to the gym for you. It completely defeats the purpose.” Read more. 

 

The Ethics (and Crime) of Plagiarism (How Stuff Works)

UA bans ‘contract cheating’ (arkansasonline.com)

We tried buying a college admissions essay online, here’s what happened (Good Morning America)