September 24, 2022

Rettinger Talks Academic Integrity With ‘Times Higher Ed’

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science and Director of Academic Integrity Programs David Rettinger spoke to Times Higher Education for a story titled, “Zero cheating is a pipe dream, but we still need to push academic integrity.” In the article, Rettinger and Erica Price Burns, who leads the research practice at Whiteboard Advisors, offer key points for institutions to consider when creating systems that encourage academic integrity among students. Read more.

Rettinger Publishes Book on Academic Integrity

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger

“Cheating Academic Integrity: Lessons from 30 Years of Research,” co-edited by Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger was published by Jossey-Bass in March. Rettinger serves as Director of Academic Integrity Programs at the University of Mary Washington. He currently leads the International Center for Academic Integrity’s research efforts and served as its President from 2018 to 2020. Learn more

Rettinger Interviewed by Inside Higher Education

Professor of Psychological Science and Director of Academic Integrity Programs David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science and Director of Academic Integrity Programs David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Services David Rettinger was published in an article entitled “Combating Student Cheating: Key Podcast Reprise” in Inside Higher Education. Rettinger is director of academic integrity programs at UMW, and Kate McConnell is assistant vice president for research and assessment and director of the Value Institute at the Association of American Colleges and Universities. Read more.

Rettinger Comments on Decrease in Cheating in Online Courses

Professor of Psychological Science and Director of Academic Integrity Programs David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science and Director of Academic Integrity Programs David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger, director of Academic Integrity Programs at UMW, was interviewed for a CampusTechnology.com article, “Cheating Concerns in Online Courses Have Eased.”

“The actual belief that their peers are cheating is one of the most important predictors of academic dishonesty,” added David Rettinger, director of academic programs at the University of Mary Washington and president emeritus of the International Center for Academic Integrity. “Being surrounded by cheaters has an almost contagious effect.” Read more. 

Survey: Cheating Concerns in Online Courses Have Eased (Campus Technology; Times of News)

Shades of Gray on Student Cheating (Inside Higher Ed)

Rettinger Comments on Cheating for Inside Higher Ed Article

Professor of Psychological Science and Director of Academic Integrity Programs David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science and Director of Academic Integrity Programs David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger, who is director of Academic Integrity Programs at UMW, weighed in on an article in Inside Higher Ed entitled, “Shades of Gray on Student Cheating”:

When David Rettinger, president emeritus of the International Center for Academic Integrity (ICAI), looked over the Student Voice data, he was drawn to the numbers that showed how much students realize certain actions would be considered cheating. “Some of [the unacceptable responses] are a little lighter for sure, but students generally would describe these behaviors as unacceptable,” says Rettinger, a professor of psychological science and director of academic integrity programs at the University of Mary Washington. “Their institutions talk about these things, and students know what they’re supposed to do, yet students cheat a fair bit.”

He can imagine a stressed-out student saying, “I know it’s unacceptable, mostly I don’t do it, but in this situation I’m going to do something I generally don’t believe in.” Read more.

How Students See Cheating, and How Colleges Can Contain It (Inside Higher Education)

Rettinger discusses how colleges can contain cheating with Inside Higher Education

Professor of Psychological Science and Director of Academic Integrity Programs David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science and Director of Academic Integrity Programs David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger, director of Academic Integrity Programs at UMW, discussed how colleges can contain cheating with Inside Higher Education.

But cheaters are not the enemy, notes David Rettinger, president emeritus of the International Center for Academic Integrity. “Your data shows this as much as anything I’ve seen. Everyone has their price: stress, family pressure, time constraints. Everyone has a breaking point. Most students are able to reach that breaking point over the course of a semester,” says Rettinger, a professor of psychological science and director of academic integrity programs at the University of Mary Washington in Virginia. Read more.

Rettinger Comments in USA Today Article on Ed Tech Platform Chegg

Professor of Psychological Science and Director of Academic Integrity Programs David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science and Director of Academic Integrity Programs David Rettinger

Professor of Psychological Science David Rettinger was interviewed in USA Today and on Yahoo.com for an article entitled, “Millions of college students use Chegg. Professors say it enables cheating – and possible blackmail.”

Company officials said they’re aware some students use its services to cheat but that Chegg works with universities to try to address the behavior. David Rettinger, a professor at the University of Mary Washington who studies academic dishonesty, said Chegg is notable for its transparency and willingness to work with academic institutions compared with other sites offering similar services. Read more.