June 29, 2022

GLBTTQQIAAP Celebration| Stand Out! Speak Up!| (October 19-28)

STAND OUT! SPEAK UP!

If all people are to get the same opportunities and rights, then everyone must Stand Out! Speak Up! Societal norms seem to be shifting, queer rights and other GLBTTQQIAAP issues are becoming more prevalent in American politics. There have been legal victories, but there’s still a long way to travel on the road to egalitarianism. Join PRISM – People for the Rights of Sexual Minorities – and the James Farmer Multicultural Center to celebrate the courage to stand out and speak up for one’s beliefs and values.

GLBTTQQIAAP Kickoff Celebration
October 19
4-6 p.m., Ball Circle
(Rain location: Great Hall,Woodard Campus Center)

PRISM welcomes the entire campus community to share in a kickoff celebration that fuses food, live music, and fun. Read “PostSecret” style coming-out stories and be inspired by the experiences, struggles, and victories of your peers.

In this corner….. Fight for Your Rights Panel Discussion
October 20
6 p.m., Lee Hall, Room 411

Join faculty, staff, and students as they discuss the many issues facing queer students at UMW. Learn about resources and tools that encourage positive change so you’ll be equipped to Speak Up!

PRISM Prom – Rio Carnival
October 22
8 p.m., Great Hall,Woodard Campus Center
Cost: $3
(Formal attire strongly encouraged)

Standing out at the high school prom might have made for a bad memory, but the memorable PRISM Prom can help undo all that. Look great and proudly stand out while you enjoy all the prom’s trappings – music, dancing, photos, and refreshments.

Changing Time, Changing Policies?
Debate on Protected Classes
October 24
6 p.m., Lee Hall, Room 411

UMW students debate whether sexual orientation and gender identity should be protected classes in Virginia and whether they should be included in the non-discrimination policies of Virginia’s colleges and universities. Stand out and speak up on the issues that affect your community.

GLBTTQQIAAP Cultural Celebration Keynote Performer: Andrea Gibson
October 26
7 p.m., Lee Hall, Room 411

A powerful live performer, Andrea Gibson is the winner of the 2008 Women’s World Poetry Slam and has placed third in the world on two international poetry slam stages. With Gibson, the personal is political. Her themes deconstruct gender norms, sexuality, class, patriarchy, and white-supremacist capitalist culture.

Queer Film Festival
Featuring Milk and The Birdcage
October 27
6 p.m., Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center
(For mature audiences)

Milk tells the story of American gay rights activist Harvey Milk and his struggles as the first openly gay person to be elected to public office in California.

The Birdcage illustrates how standing out and speaking up can be difficult. A gay cabaret owner and his drag queen companion agree to their son’s request to put up a straight front when his fiancée’s anti-gay, moralistic parents come to call.

UMW to Host Freedom Riders during March 30-April 1 Events

The University of Mary Washington will host a panel of Freedom Riders for a Great Lives Lecture Series discussion on Thursday, March 31 as part of three days of events honoring the 1961 Freedom Rides that challenged segregated interstate bus travel in the Deep South.

Freedom Riders Charles Person and Catherine Burks-Brooks will be joined by fellow riders Reginald Green and Joan Trumpauer Mulholland at 7:30 p.m. on March 31 in George Washington Hall, Dodd Auditorium, for a conversation led by Raymond Arsenault, author of “Freedom Riders: 1961 and the Struggle for Racial Justice.”

Charles Person, then an 18-year-old Morehouse College freshman and the youngest member of the original Freedom Ride, was one of the most badly beaten riders during the May 14, 1961 riot at the Birmingham, Ala., Trailways bus station. Catherine Burks-Brooks, then a 21-year-old Tennessee State University student, found herself in the May 20, 1961 riot at the Montgomery, Ala., Greyhound bus station and the next day at the siege of Montgomery’s First Baptist Church.

Other highlights of the March 30-April 1 events include the March 30 talk “Lessons of the Civil Rights Generation for Today’s Students” by Andy Lewis, the March 30 screening of the critically acclaimed PBS film “Freedom Riders” and the April 1 UMW-Hampton University debate of the topic “Resolved: Today’s Students Wouldn’t Get on the Bus.” The student-created “Down Freedom’s Main Line” museum exhibit will be on display in the Dodd Auditorium foyer through commencement.

The university began its three-month commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Freedom Rides on February 6 with the Rev. Reginald Green and Joan Mulholland on hand for the unveiling of a 1960s-era bus and exhibit of historical photos of the rides led by James L. Farmer Jr., the late civil rights leader and UMW professor.

The celebration will culminate with commencement addresses by former Freedom Riders. U.S. Rep. Bob Filner (D-Calif.) will speak at the May 6 graduate ceremony, and U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) will deliver the address at the May 7 undergraduate ceremony. On May 8, the PBS “American Experience” bus carrying college students and Freedom Riders will make its first stop at the Fredericksburg campus on its journey from Washington, D.C. to Jackson, Miss. Forty students will be selected through a national competition to retrace the route of the original Freedom Ride.

Freedom Riders were beaten and jailed, and their buses were attacked during the rides organized by Farmer, then head of CORE, the Congress of Racial Equality. Farmer taught civil rights history at Mary Washington for about a dozen years before his retirement in 1998. That year, President Bill Clinton awarded Farmer the Presidential Medal of Freedom. In 2010, the university launched its campaign for a U.S. postage stamp honoring Farmer.

The public is invited to the following events:

  • A talk by Andy Lewis, author of “The Shadows of Youth: The Remarkable Journey of the Civil Rights Generation,” at 3 p.m. on Wednesday, March 30, in Lee Hall, Room 411.
  • A limited-release showing of the documentary “Freedom Riders” at 7 p.m. on March 30 in Dodd Auditorium. PBS and UMW have collaborated on this special screening of the widely hailed film directed by Stanley Nelson and based on Raymond Arsenault’s book “Freedom Riders.” PBS will broadcast the film in May on “American Experience.”
  • A Freedom Riders panel discussion and Great Lives lecture at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 31, in Dodd Auditorium, featuring Arsenault leading a conversation among the Freedom Riders—Burks-Brooks, Green, Mulholland and Person.
  • A debate between UMW and Hampton University teams on the topic “Resolved: Today’s students wouldn’t get on the bus” from 3 to 4:15 p.m. on Friday, April 1 in Lee Hall, Room 411.

The public is encouraged to check periodically for event updates at http://freedomrides.umw.edu.

On May 4, 1961, when the 13 original Freedom Riders led by Farmer left Washington, D.C. on the first ride, segregation was decreed by local and state laws throughout the South, despite federal prohibition against the Jim Crow restrictions on the movements of black Americans.

The original Freedom Riders—a racially mixed group of men and women, ranging in age from 18 to 61—traveled on buses through Virginia and into the Deep South, risking their lives as they faced police brutality, vigilantes and even bombs.

Attorney General Robert Kennedy sent federal marshals to Alabama to restore order after mob violence erupted, and at one point, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. flew to Alabama to support the riders. When news of the brutality against the first rides reached the nation and the world, activists from all over the U.S. joined the effort. In all, more than 400 Freedom Riders—a majority of whom were jailed in Jackson, Miss.—traveled through the South to demand just treatment of all interstate travelers.

Afro-Latin American Women’s Writings in Latin America

March 29, 2011 :: Lee Hall, 411 :: 6 p.m.

The legacy of Black women’s writings in Latin American remains at best one of the least known bodies of literature in the Americas. This presentation takes up that issue as it seeks to confront some of the situations that surround that body of work, at times paying special attention to the writers themselves. Presented by Dr. Dawn Duke, Assistant Professor of Spanish and Portuguese in the Department of Modern Foreign Languages and Literatures at The University of Tennessee . Dr. Duke specializes in Afro-Latin American literature and cultural studies.

Make-up Drive to Benefit Hope House


The Women’s History Month Committee is sponsoring an event on March 25, 2011 from 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. titled, Fresh Face to the World…Easy, Breezy, No Makeup on that Covergirl. The purpose of the drive is to inform students, faculty, and staff that true beauty is far beyond the general products some individuals administer to their  bodies each day and encourage them to participate in a one-day attempt to eliminate beauty enhancing products from their daily routine.

We encourage everyone to please donate any unused and unopened makeup they may have to benefit this wonderful cause. All donations will go to help the women of Hope House, a local nonprofit organization geared toward assisting homeless women and their families during their journey of regaining financial independence.

Donations can be made throughout the entire month of March to the James Farmer Multicultural Center (Lee Hall, 211). In advance, thank you to all that donate and plan to participate!

DUCC Bullying Forum

The Diversity and Unity Coordinating Committee of UMW is to provide the UMW and Fredericksburg area communities with a Bullying Forum.  Faculty and administrators from UMW’s College of Education, Psychology Department, Counseling and Psychology Services and the Office of Judicial Affairs will facilitate the discussion and serve as experts
in their respective fields.  The purpose of the forum is to provide participants with an opportunity to productively discuss bullying as it comes into conflict with our communities.  Various forms of bullying and its repercussions will be explored from the perspective of the bully, the victims of bullying, as well as the onlookers of these acts.  The forum is scheduled for 6 o’clock in the evening Thursday, February 17, 2011 in Lee Hall Room 412 on UMW’s Fredericksburg campus.  For more information or questions, pleasecontact Lee Gilliam at lgilliam@mail.umw.edu.

Afro-Latin American Women’s Writings in Latin America

March 29, 2011 :: Lee Hall, 411 :: 6 p.m.

The legacy of Black women’s writings in Latin American remains at best one of the least known bodies of literature in the Americas. This presentation takes up that issue as it seeks to confront some of the situations that surround that body of work, at times paying special attention to the writers themselves. Presented by Dr. Dawn Duke, Assistant Professor of Spanish and Portuguese in the Department of Modern Foreign Languages and Literatures at The University of Tennessee . Dr. Duke specializes in Afro-Latin American literature and cultural studies.

Women’s History Month 2011 “Role” Call: Women’s Presence and Power in Society

Sheesh, Is She Crying Again?

The Connection between Gender and Rationality

Date: March 8 | Time: 3:30-4:45 p.m.

Location: Annex A, Room 110

Traditionally, women have been associated with an excess of emotion and a lack of mental discipline; men, on the other hand, have been thought to be more rational. Do these stereotypes still exist? Please join Dr. Ray Mataloni, Visiting Professor of Economics as he discusses this topic and much more.

Who Opens the Door and Covers the Check? Exploring Roles and Stereotypes in the GLBTTQQIAAP Community

Date: March 9 | Time: 6 p.m.

Location: Meeting Room #4, Woodard Campus Center

Please join members of Women of Color and People for the Rights of Individuals of Sexual Minorities (PRISM) for a stimulating conversation about the expected and stereotypical roles of women in GLBTTQQIAAP relationships. FOOD WILL BE PROVIDED

Latin American Women Intellectuals

Date: March 10

Time: 5:30 p.m.

Location: Combs 139

Join Dr. Claudia Cabello-Hutt, Assistant Professor at The University of North Carolina Greensboro as she discusses how Latin American women writers challenged the traditional definition of the Latin American public intellectual.

Writing the South in the 21st Century

Date: March 10 | Time: 7 p.m.

Location: Combs 139

Award-winning author Jill McCorkle, a writing professor at N.C. State University, will talk about what it means to be among the foremost female fiction writers of our time.

You Better Work!

Open Lecture featuring 2003 America’s Next Top Model finalist April Wilkner

Date: March 14 | Time: 6 p.m.

Location: Lee Hall 411

April Wilkner will discuss her experience as a model-hopeful on one of the world’s leading shows. Her emphasis will be on the significance of intelligence and diversity within the modeling industry.

Ms. UMW: More than a just Beauty Pageant

Date: March 15 | Time: 7 p.m.

Location: Dodd Auditorium, George Washington Hall

Join UMW hopefuls as they compete for the coveted title of Ms. UMW in this nontraditional pageant that celebrates women and their beauty from the inside out.

Dr. Gail Dines Women’s History Month Keynote & Cultural Awareness Series Speaker

Date: March 16 | Time: 7 p.m.

Location: Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center

A professor, author, and internationally-acclaimed lecturer, Gail Dines is an energetic and outspoken critic of pornography and the hypersexuality that permeates pop culture. Dines’ vision is to heighten awareness of the shallow and sexist side of the mass media, and she has targeted outlets like MTV with undermining equality and intimacy in relationships.

The Vagina Monologues

Date: March 18 & 19 | Time: 8-9:30 pm

Location: Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center

Cost: $3 in advance; $5 at the door

Proceeds to benefit Hope House

Email zoller.eli@gmail.com to purchase tickets.

The 8th annual UMW production of The Vagina Monologues, written by Eve Ensler, uses the arts to explore women’s issues such as sex, love, rape, abuse, relationships, menstruation, and childbirth. By promoting inner beauty and self-worth, The Vagina Monologues celebrates the true essence of the vagina, femininity, and the ability to speak out against the pressures of society.

The Gender Pay Gap:

Where do Women Stand Now?

Date: March 22 | Time: 7 p.m.

Location: Lee Hall 411

Join Radford University Professor of Psychology Hilary M. Lips as she explores the current status of the gender pay gap and how it undercuts women’s power and limits their achievements in today’s workforce.

Women’s Research Symposium

Date: March 23 | Time: 4-6 p.m.

Location: Red Room, Woodard Campus Center

Please join UMW students as they showcase their undergraduate research in women’s studies. Cash prizes will be awarded to winners. Please contact Professor Cooperman at rcooperm@umw.edu for more information regarding submitting an entry.

This is What Makes Her Special…

Brown Bag Lunch

Date: March 24 | Time: Noon

Location: The Underground

Join campus and community members as they read short stories and poems about the women who have had the greatest impact on their lives.

Fresh Face to the World…Easy, Breezy, No Makeup on that CoverGirl

Makeup Drive

Date: March 25 | Time: 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

Locations: Lee Hall 211 or OSACS office

Beauty is far more than enhanced eyelashes, plucked brows, and fiery red lips. Campus and community members are invited to share their true beauty by participating in a day devoted to no makeup. Participants are strongly encouraged to donate their new and unopened cosmetic products to benefit Hope House.

For Colored Girls

Film and Discussion

Date: March 29 | Time: 7 p.m.

Location: Lee Hall 412

Based on Ntozake Shange’s Obie Award-winning play, For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Enuf, this presentation is a poetic exploration of what it means to be a woman of color in today’s world. Discussion immediately following the film. Food will be provided.

Freedom Riders

Great Lives lecture featuring Raymond Arsenault

Date: March 31 | Time: 7:30 p.m.

Location: Dodd Auditorium, George Washington Hall

Raymond Arsenault, author of Freedom Riders: 1961 and the Struggle for Racial Justice, will present the Great Lives lecture, followed by a discussion with a panel of Freedom Riders, which will include some of the women who changed the face of racial and gender equality for our country

Freedom Rides Video

With a 40-foot-long silver bus as its central canvas, the James Farmer and the Freedom Rides exhibit carries visitors back to the spring of 1961, when a group of courageous men and women risked their lives to desegregate interstate public transportation.

This one-of-a-kind exhibition comes to life through a video, at http://freedomrides.umw.edu, produced for UMW by photographer Norm Shafer. The video incorporates footage of the arrival of the 1960s-era bus on campus and photos of the February 7 kick off of the university’s three-month celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Freedom Rides.

Free and open to the public through March 31, the James Farmer and the Freedom Rides exhibit allows visitors to add their voices to those of others as they ponder the question, “Would you get on the bus?” The public can post their thoughts in the comments area of this exhibition.

School groups of all ages are encouraged to visit the Fredericksburg campus and experience this unusual exhibit. James Farmer and the Freedom Rides was created by a UMW committee comprising Courtney Chapman, AJ Newell, Maria Schultz, Elisabeth Sommer, and Neva Trenis.

UMW Kicks Off Tribute to Freedom Rides, James Farmer

With a 1960s-era bus and historical photos of the 1961 Freedom Rides as a backdrop, two of the Freedom Riders urged students to apply the lessons of the civil rights movement to today’s causes, kicking off the University of Mary Washington’s semester-long tribute to the Freedom Rides.

“I hope you can find what you will step up for,” Freedom Rider Joan Trumpauer Mulholland of Arlington, Va. told the crowd of more than 600 gathered at Ball Circle. As a college student, Mulholland joined the 1961 Freedom Rides “to make my home, the South, what it could be and should be.”

Mulholland and fellow Freedom Rider Reginald Green traveled to UMW for the launch of the university’s 50th-anniversary commemoration of the 1961 rides that challenged segregated bus transportation throughout the South. The architect and leader of the rides was James L. Farmer Jr., the late civil rights leader and UMW professor.

“Now it is the challenge of all of us—young people, college students—to find some project, some issue, that you are passionate about. Maybe it’s hunger, maybe it’s ecology, maybe it’s education,” Rev. Reginald Green of Washington, D.C. told the crowd. To hearty applause, he added, “Maybe it’s the message that says we’ve come too far to turn back now.”

The university placed a 40-foot-long bus on Ball Circle to serve as a canvas for large historical photos, including images of firebombed buses and the brutal beatings of Freedom Riders by Southern mobs. Through March 31, visitors are encouraged to share their thoughts about the rides and the “Would You Get on the Bus?” exhibit, which features life-size cutouts of James Farmer, a student Freedom Rider and a National Guardsman.

“The bus and people talking about the rides put into perspective how people had to go through so much to be equal among people,” said Kellan Latif, a sophomore from Richmond. “Being here as an African American and seeing the event, I feel honored. We’re getting recognition for things we had to go through.”

Students found inspiration in the memories shared by Green and Mulholland. “It’s amazing what they put on the line to fight for freedom. I applaud them and I’m thankful for what they did,” said Julie Dymon, a senior from Spotsylvania. Aqsa Zafar, a junior from Arlington, was impressed that Mulholland drew a parallel between the civil rights struggles and the ongoing anti-government protests by Egyptian students and other activists: “It’s amazing how she made that a connection because it’s really relevant to us.”

Freedom Riders were beaten and jailed, and their buses were attacked during the rides organized by James Farmer, then head of CORE, the Congress of Racial Equality. Farmer taught the history of the civil rights movement to Mary Washington students for about a dozen years before his retirement in 1998. That year, President Bill Clinton awarded Farmer the Presidential Medal of Freedom. In 2010, the university launched its campaign for a U.S. postage stamp honoring Farmer.

The university’s tribute to the rides will include the March 30 limited-release showing of the critically acclaimed PBS documentary “Freedom Riders.” The celebration will culminate with the May 7 commencement address by U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.), a Freedom Rider and civil rights leader, and a May 8 stop at UMW by the PBS “American Experience” bus carrying college-age students retracing the route of the first Freedom Ride.

The public is invited to the following events that are part of the Freedom Rides tribute, beginning during Black History Month:

• A lecture by Eric Etheridge at 7 p.m. Feb. 7 in the Great Hall, Woodard Campus Center. A journalist and photographer, Etheridge recently interviewed and photographed many of the original Freedom Riders for his book, “Breach of Peace: Portraits of the 1961 Freedom Riders.”

• An address, “Lessons of the Civil Rights Generation for Today’s Students,” by Andy Lewis, author of The Shadows of Youth: The Remarkable Journey of the Civil Rights Generation, from 3 to 5 p.m., Wednesday, March 30, in Lee Hall, room 411.

• Limited-release showing of the film “Freedom Riders” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 30, in Dodd Auditorium, George Washington Hall. PBS and UMW have collaborated on this special showing of the widely hailed documentary directed by Stanley Nelson. PBS will broadcast the film in May on “American Experience.”

• Freedom Riders panel discussion and Great Lives lecture at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 31, in Dodd Auditorium, featuring a talk by Raymond Arsenault, author of Freedom Riders: 1961 and the Struggle for Racial Justice, followed by a discussion with a panel of Freedom Riders.

• UMW commencement address by Rep. Lewis, part of the ceremony at 9 a.m., Saturday, May 7 on Ball Circle. Lewis, a civil rights colleague of James Farmer and organizer of sit-ins to protest segregation, co-founded and chaired the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, a leading organization for student activism.

• Students aboard the PBS “American Experience” bus retracing the route of the first Freedom Ride will stop Sunday, May 8 at UMW in Fredericksburg, part of the original route, for a commemoration at the James Farmer memorial on Campus Walk.

Check for event updates at http://freedomrides.umw.edu. Learn about the university’s Farmer stamp campaign at http://jamesfarmer.umw.edu.

On May 4, 1961, when Farmer and the other 12 original Freedom Riders left Washington, D.C. on the first ride, segregation was decreed by local and state laws throughout the South, despite federal prohibition against the Jim Crow laws restricting the movements of black Americans.

The original Freedom Riders—a racially mixed group of men and women, ranging in age from 18 to 61—traveled on buses through Virginia and into the Deep South, risking their lives as they faced police brutality, vigilantes and even bombs.

Attorney General Robert Kennedy sent federal marshals to Alabama to restore order after mob violence erupted, and at one point, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. flew to Alabama to support the riders. When news of the brutality against the first rides reached the nation and the world, activists from all over the U.S. joined the effort. In all, more than 400 Freedom Riders—a majority of whom were jailed in Jackson, Miss.—traveled through the South to demand just treatment of all interstate travelers.

Don’t Miss It: Monday, Noon, Ball Circle

To Members of the UMW Faculty and Staff,

You probably have noticed this week the buildup to the launch of the Freedom Rides 50th Anniversary Commemoration.  I am very excited about this opportunity for us to come together as a community to honor Dr. James Farmer, who was the architect of the Freedom Rides, and to recognize the sacrifices made by those courageous individuals who put their lives on the line to transform our nation.

I write to call to your attention the kickoff activity that will occur on Monday, February 7 at noon on Ball Circle.  This will be the official unveiling of a special outdoor exhibit designed to tell the story of the Freedom Rides and to commemorate the actions the Freedom Riders took 50 years ago.  Present will be Eric Etheridge, author of the book Breach of Peace, a photo journalistic portrayal of the Freedom Riders, along with two actual Freedom Riders.

If your schedule permits, I hope you will attend this event.  I also ask you to encourage UMW students to participate.  I know that it will be a meaningful experience.

If you do plan to attend, please feel free to stop by the James Farmer Multicultural Center in Lee Hall prior to the event to pick up a free t-shirt.  A limited number of these shirts will be available on Monday.

I encourage you also to attend other events throughout the semester that will commemorate the 50th Anniversary.  You may get additional details at the following website: http://freedomrides.umw.edu

Thank you.

Richard V. Hurley
President