August 5, 2020

Liss, Erchull Study on Selfies and Self-Objectification Featured on WVTF

Professor of Psychological Science Miriam Liss

Professors of Psychological Science Miriam Liss and Mindy Erchull’s recent study into selfies and self-objectification among young women was recently featured on WVTF 88.3 Radio IQ.

YouTube is loaded with videos advising young women on how to take a good selfie.

“You just have to find your good side. Like this is my good side, but this side is a no!” says one.

Professor of Psychological Science Mindy Erchull

Professor of Psychological Science Mindy Erchull

Which is why psychology professor Miriam Liss chose to take a closer look. She and her colleague Mindy Erchull studied 165 female students at their school – the University of Mary Washington. They found some girls took as many as 30 selfies before posting one.

“They’re thinking ‘How does my body look? Is my tummy looking big, are my arms flabby, does my nose look too big?’” she explains. “We’re often putting ourselves in a state of self-objectification.”

And that could lead to serious psychological problems: eating disorders, depression, anxiety, sexual dysfunction, a loss of a sense of flow, which is the ability to be in the moment and enjoy what you’re doing. Read more.

Liss, Erchull Study Highlighted in Psychology Journal

Professor of Psychological Science Miriam Liss

Professor of Psychological Science Mindy Erchull

Professor of Psychological Science Mindy Erchull

Psychological Science Professors Miriam Liss and Mindy Erchull’s research on selfie behaviors, self-objectification and depressive behaviors in women was recently published in the psychology journal, Sex Roles. Women are given the message that they are valued for their physical attractiveness above other qualities, and the study examines how self-objectification interplays with online behaviors.

“I have been collaborating with Mindy Erchull on issues related to objectification theory for several years. I had also begun to be interested in the effects of social media on people’s experiences and had recently taught a senior seminar on the topic,” said Liss, the study’s lead author.

“[We] became interested in how objectification relates to experiences with social media — particularly Instagram, which is a platform that is based on posting visual images. Other studies on the topic had largely looked at how feelings of self-objectification can be a consequence of social media. We wanted to look at how self-objectification can change how one behaves when taking and posting selfies.” Read more.

Erchull Quoted in Article on Teen Body Image and the Rise of Cosmetic Surgery

Professor of Psychological Science Mindy Erchull

Professor of Psychological Science Mindy Erchull

Professor of Psychological Science Mindy Erchull was quoted in an article on MEA WorldWide entitled “‘Unrealistically perfect images’ on social media influencing more and more teens to go under the knife.” Professor Erchull said, “The answer to more and more teens opting for cosmetic surgeries lies in how these young kids perceive their own body image and their thought process built around it.” Read more. 

 

 

“Unrealistically perfect images” on social media influencing more and more teens to go under the knife (meaww.com)

2019 Psi Chi UMW PowerCards on Sale

The 2019 Psi Chi UMW PowerCards are in and available for purchase.  These cards are available for just $5 each and offer discounts at great Fredericksburg businesses that you can use for the entire calendar year!

You get to save money and help support the great activities of the UMW chapter of Psi Chi, the International Honor Society in Psychology.

The discounts on this year’s PowerCard include 10% off at Greens & Grains, Metro Diner, and Skin + Touch Therapy Spa as well as 15% off at Soup and Taco, Soup and Taco II, Noodles & Company, and Tropical Smoothie Cafe (to name just some of the great deals).

You can purchase a PowerCard for yourself, your club, your team, your friend, your roommate, your neighbor, or anyone else. If you’re interested,  you can purchase a card from a Psi Chi officer or member.

If you don’t know who’s a member/officer, you can contact Mindy Erchull (merchull@umw.edu), their faculty advisor, and she’ll connect you with someone.  You can also contact the chapter directly at psichiumw@gmail.com.

What Parents Can Learn From a Town That Produced 11 Olympians (The New York Times)

Psi Chi UMW PowerCards on Sale

The 2018 Psi Chi UMW PowerCards are in and available for purchase.  These cards are available for just $5 each and offer discounts at great Fredericksburg businesses that you can use for the entire calendar year!

You get to save money and help support the great activities of the UMW chapter of Psi Chi, the International Honor Society in Psychology.

The discounts on this year’s PowerCard include 10% off at Greens & Grains, Mercantile, Miso, and Sammy T’s as well as 15% off at Soup and Taco II, Sugar Shack, and Tropical Smoothie Cafe (to name just some of the great deals).

You can purchase a PowerCard for yourself, your club, your team, your friend, your roommate, your neighbor, or anyone else. If you’re interested,  you can purchase a card from a Psi Chi officer or member.

If you don’t know who’s a member/officer, you can contact Mindy Erchull (merchull@umw.edu), their faculty advisor, and she’ll connect you with someone.  You can also contact the chapter directly at psichiumw@gmail.com

Why Mental Health Is A Feminist Issue (talkspace.com)

2017 Psi Chi PowerCards Available

The UMW chapter of Psi Chi, the International Honor Society in Psychology, is starting its 2017 fundraiser. Each year, Fredericksburg-area businesses offer discounts for the calendar year to those who purchase a card. For $5, you can save money throughout the year and help a great group of students fund their projects at the same time. If you’re interested in purchasing one, you can contact their faculty advisor, Mindy Erchull (merchull@umw.edu) or the chapter officers (psichiumw@gmail.com).

UMW Psychology Professor Featured on With Good Reason (publicnow.com)