May 9, 2021

Cooperman Interviewed in Telegraph on Biden’s First 100 Days

Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman

Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman

Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman was interviewed for an article/video story in The Telegraph entitled, “President Biden is failing to dismantle Trump’s legacy and heal a divided nation.” The piece also discusses Biden’s first 100 days as president. Read more.

Cooperman Discusses Republican Women in The Atlantic, The Daily Beast

Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman

Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman

Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman was quoted in an article in The Atlantic entitled, “Democrats Have a Republican Women Problem.”

“Women are particularly good at thinking communally,” Rosalyn Cooperman, a political-science professor at the University of Mary Washington who studies women’s political involvement, told me. “They’re thinking about what this means for when their kids are going to go back to school, if they have to work from home, how their jobs and family life have all been upended.” Read more.

Cooperman was also featured in an article in The Daily Beast entitled, “2020 Was a Big Win for Women—Republican Women.”

“Republicans should be thanking their lucky stars for the women that are running this cycle,” said Rosalyn Cooperman, a political science professor at the University of Mary Washington. “The inroads that were made by Republicans in 2020 on the House side were made by women, and they would be well-served to remember that.” Read more.

Cooperman Discusses Female Congressional Candidates on Facebook Panel

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman

Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman joined a Facebook Live panel on Oct. 29 to discuss the book, “Politicking While Female: The Political Lives of Women,” and her chapter, “On the Money: Assessing the Campaign Finance Networks of Women Congressional Candidates.” Watch here.

Cooperman was also quoted in an article in The Daily Beast, entitled, “2020 Was a Big Win for Women—Republican Women.”

“Republicans should be thanking their lucky stars for the women that are running this cycle,” said Rosalyn Cooperman, a political science professor at the University of Mary Washington. “The inroads that were made by Republicans in 2020 on the House side were made by women, and they would be well-served to remember that.” Read more.

2020 Election By The Numbers – Infographic & Stats (WalletHub)

Voting-related legal challenges likely to continue past Election Day (marketplace.org)

Cooperman Discusses Voting-Related Legal Challenges on Marketplace Radio

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman spoke with the Marketplace radio show about how voting-related legal challenges will continue past Election Day.

Rosalyn Cooperman, a professor of political science at the University of Mary Washington, said the pandemic has played a role in the spike in donations.

“I think that COVID has incentivized giving, particularly for folks who are paying close attention to the elections that are coming down the pike,” she said. “The presidential race, but also the Senate increasingly, has become competitive not just for individual races, but also for majority party control of the Senate. And this provides lots of incentives for folks on both sides.” Listen here.

Is 2020 the Year of the Republican Woman? Women’s PAC support for Republican Women Candidates Suggests Otherwise (cawp.rutgers.edu)

Cooperman Publishes Article on Republican Women

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman contributed an article to the Center for American Women and Politics (CAWP) Election Watch Project, entitled, “Is 2020 the Year of the Republican Woman? Women’s PAC support for Republican Women Candidates Suggests Otherwise.”

Women’s gains to Congress in the 2018 midterm elections were party specific. That year nearly three dozen new Democratic women, and just one Republican woman, were elected to the U.S. House. As Republican women’s membership in the House shrunk to 13, Representative Elise Stefanik (NY-21) promised to “play in primaries” to increase the number of Republican women running for Congress in 2020. Since then, much has been written about whether 2020 would be the year of the Republican woman as it had been for Democratic women in 2018. To be sure, the increased number of Republican women House candidates on the ballot this cycle bodes well for those within and outside of the party working to recruit and elect more Republican women. After all, women can’t win if they don’t run. Many of these candidates also hold credentials including distinguished military service, community activism, and previous officeholding that enhance their standing. A closer examination of the most competitive House elections along with existing campaign finance networks available to these women, however, reveals a more nuanced evaluation of Republican women running for Congress in 2020. While more Republican women are running for the House this year than in previous cycles, they are hampered by their status as challengers – further complicated for some by a late primary schedule – and the patchy campaign finance network available specifically to them to aid their fundraising efforts. Together, these challenges present significant roadblocks for Republican women candidates and the efforts to grow their ranks. Read more.

Free UMW Course Turns COVID-19 Inside Out

Political leaders and health experts who communicate the impact of COVID-19 to the public are just like anyone else. Some hit the mark. Some don’t. Understandable terms, relatable ideas and the confident presentation of useful information are key to delivering a successful message, said UMW Professor of Communication Anand Rao. And competent public discourse during […]

UMW Opens ‘COVID-19 in Context’ Course to Community

Those who think they’ve heard everything that can be said about COVID-19 can guess again.

UMW faculty will share their perspectives on the COVID-19 pandemic in a free eight-week online summer course open to incoming and current students, faculty, alumni, staff and the broader community.

UMW faculty will share their perspectives on the COVID-19 pandemic in a free eight-week online summer course open to incoming and current students, faculty, alumni, staff and the broader community.

Experts at the University of Mary Washington are sharing their perspectives through COVID-19 in Context, an eight-week online summer course starting June 1 that will be open free of charge to not only UMW students, faculty, alumni and staff, but also the broader community. The 16 classes will be delivered right to cell phones, tablets and computers via Zoom. All participants need is Internet access.

Each session will look at the coronavirus pandemic from a different angle – the effect on climate change, the history of pandemics, the potential impact on our upcoming presidential election, the chemistry of disinfectants, and even how COVID-19 has influenced the fine and performing arts.

Each Monday and Wednesday through July 22, at 4 p.m., faculty from varied disciplines across the University, from psychology and communication to geography and economics, will broadcast a 30-minute lecture followed by an interactive Q&A session. The inaugural class, on June 1, will be a biologist’s look at the virus itself. Read more.