August 15, 2020

Is 2020 the Year of the Republican Woman? Women’s PAC support for Republican Women Candidates Suggests Otherwise (cawp.rutgers.edu)

Cooperman Publishes Article on Republican Women

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman contributed an article to the Center for American Women and Politics (CAWP) Election Watch Project, entitled, “Is 2020 the Year of the Republican Woman? Women’s PAC support for Republican Women Candidates Suggests Otherwise.”

Women’s gains to Congress in the 2018 midterm elections were party specific. That year nearly three dozen new Democratic women, and just one Republican woman, were elected to the U.S. House. As Republican women’s membership in the House shrunk to 13, Representative Elise Stefanik (NY-21) promised to “play in primaries” to increase the number of Republican women running for Congress in 2020. Since then, much has been written about whether 2020 would be the year of the Republican woman as it had been for Democratic women in 2018. To be sure, the increased number of Republican women House candidates on the ballot this cycle bodes well for those within and outside of the party working to recruit and elect more Republican women. After all, women can’t win if they don’t run. Many of these candidates also hold credentials including distinguished military service, community activism, and previous officeholding that enhance their standing. A closer examination of the most competitive House elections along with existing campaign finance networks available to these women, however, reveals a more nuanced evaluation of Republican women running for Congress in 2020. While more Republican women are running for the House this year than in previous cycles, they are hampered by their status as challengers – further complicated for some by a late primary schedule – and the patchy campaign finance network available specifically to them to aid their fundraising efforts. Together, these challenges present significant roadblocks for Republican women candidates and the efforts to grow their ranks. Read more.

Free UMW Course Turns COVID-19 Inside Out

Political leaders and health experts who communicate the impact of COVID-19 to the public are just like anyone else. Some hit the mark. Some don’t. Understandable terms, relatable ideas and the confident presentation of useful information are key to delivering a successful message, said UMW Professor of Communication Anand Rao. And competent public discourse during […]

UMW Opens ‘COVID-19 in Context’ Course to Community

Those who think they’ve heard everything that can be said about COVID-19 can guess again.

UMW faculty will share their perspectives on the COVID-19 pandemic in a free eight-week online summer course open to incoming and current students, faculty, alumni, staff and the broader community.

UMW faculty will share their perspectives on the COVID-19 pandemic in a free eight-week online summer course open to incoming and current students, faculty, alumni, staff and the broader community.

Experts at the University of Mary Washington are sharing their perspectives through COVID-19 in Context, an eight-week online summer course starting June 1 that will be open free of charge to not only UMW students, faculty, alumni and staff, but also the broader community. The 16 classes will be delivered right to cell phones, tablets and computers via Zoom. All participants need is Internet access.

Each session will look at the coronavirus pandemic from a different angle – the effect on climate change, the history of pandemics, the potential impact on our upcoming presidential election, the chemistry of disinfectants, and even how COVID-19 has influenced the fine and performing arts.

Each Monday and Wednesday through July 22, at 4 p.m., faculty from varied disciplines across the University, from psychology and communication to geography and economics, will broadcast a 30-minute lecture followed by an interactive Q&A session. The inaugural class, on June 1, will be a biologist’s look at the virus itself. Read more.

UMW Opens ‘COVID-19 in Context’ Course to Community

Those who think they’ve heard everything that can be said about COVID-19 can guess again. Experts at the University of Mary Washington are sharing their perspectives through COVID-19 in Context, an eight-week online summer course starting June 1 that will be open free of charge to not only UMW students, faculty, alumni and staff, but also the […]

Cooperman Comments on Super Tuesday on WAMU 88.5

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman commented on the battle for delegates in Virginia’s Super Tuesday Primary on WAMU 88.5.

Political scientist Rosalyn Cooperman at the University of Mary Washington said healthcare was a key issue for voters in the primary. “It’s an issue all the candidates have talked about,” she said. “Everything from Sanders’ Medicare for All to Biden talking about the Affordable Care Act, and maintaining protections for preexisting conditions.”

She added that defeating Trump was similarly top of mind.

“It’s not just an anti-Trump message. It’s the notion of getting back to an era where there was more predictability,” Cooperman said. Read more.

Cooperman Discusses Women’s Republican PAC Involvement in Primary Race

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman was interviewed for an article in the Sunflower State Journal on a Women’s Republican PAC’s decision to get involved in a primary race between two female GOP candidates.

“It’s highly significant,” said Cooperman. “What is unusual about this move is that it came so early and it came in a race with other Republican women. That to me is the most noteworthy thing.” Read more. 

Beshear’s Transition Team Has Familiar Names, Longtime Donors To Family (WFPL)

French Study Abroad Sparks Joy in Alumnus

Stephen Lamm ’19 was a junior at Mary Washington when he studied abroad at the foot of the Alps. During those four months, he learned to speak fluent French and trekked across Europe. He also lost his grandfather – and found himself. As an openly gay student who led UMW’s College Republicans, Lamm spent his […]

Cooperman Comments on Kentucky Governor-Elect

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman commented on Kentucky Governor-Elect Andy Beshear’s decision to select for his transition team longtime supporters of his family’s political campaigns.

According to the article, “The most active and involved Democrats are oftentimes most likely to be giving money to support their candidate, said Rosalyn Cooperman, associate professor of political science at the University of Mary Washington.

‘This is intuitive,’ she said. ‘The electoral context is that Democrats – or any party – are strategic actors if they want to win.’

And money is critical to win in a high-profile, competitive race, Cooperman said.” Read more.