August 11, 2020

Indus Special with Ejaz Haider | Pakistan & Afghan peace | US-Taiwan arms deal | Ep 389 (Indus News)

The Taipei Act: Well Intended But Uncertain? (Taiwan Insight)

PSIA Professor Larus comments on Indus News on US citizen protests against closures (News Wire)

Larus Comments on U.S. Protests Over Excessive Lockdown Measures

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Freund Larus

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Freund Larus

Elizabeth Freund Larus, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs and Fulbright Scholar offered comments on Indus News on U.S. protests over coronavirus-related measures. Professor Larus claims that U.S. citizens are within their constitutional rights to assembly and freedom speech in protesting excessive lockdown measures imposed by some governors. View the interview here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HZwFvwG7bpo

 

Elizabeth Larus: Together Again

Spending 14 days in quarantine is difficult. But it’s even harder when you have to avoid loved ones you haven’t seen for the past three months.

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Larus

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Larus

Just ask Mary Washington Political Science Professor Elizabeth Larus, who was recently evacuated from Poland due to the coronavirus outbreak. She had been there combing through archives and meeting with European scholars since late December.

The recipient of a prestigious Fulbright Scholarship grant, Larus – an expert in Chinese politics who earned UMW’s Waple Professorship last year – was researching the impact that China’s Belt and Road Initiative, also known as the new Silk Road, has had on Eastern and Central Europe. Hosted by Marie Curie-Sklodowska University in Lublin, she spent several days visiting Hungary in early March, returning just 48 hours before Poland closed its borders.

“The Polish government was extremely proactive,” she said. “Other than pharmacies, grocery stores and other essential businesses, they shut everything down very quickly.”

Armed with a face mask, gloves and hand sanitizer, Larus managed to catch a flight home before everything was locked down. Sequestered in her room at home for the last two weeks, she kept herself busy working, completing crossword puzzles and organizing her closet.

She also caught up on reading. Larus just finished We Were the Lucky Ones, based on the true story of a Jewish family living in Poland during World War II – not far from where she lived there. The survival tale is fitting for the times we’re living in, said Larus. “After the war was over, they were all together again.”

The same could be said for Larus. After three months – and two long weeks – she finally reunited with her husband and three children on Sunday.

Q: What were some of your most memorable experiences in Poland?
A: Exploring the churches and cathedrals, and enjoying fresh bread, pastries and doughnuts at Polish bakeries and cafés.

Q: Is there anything the U.S. can learn from how China is handling the pandemic?
A: Looking at China and its lack of transparency about its recovery, we shouldn’t get overly optimistic about how fast we’re going to get over this economic setback.

Q: Have you had any virtual contact with your students or colleagues?
A: I’ve responded to departmental emails and to a few students who have reached out. I’m still on educational leave, so I’m not advising or teaching this semester.

Q: What do you miss the most about being on the UMW campus?
A: Interacting with my students.

Q: What’s the most rewarding part of your job?
A: Traveling and engaging with foreign scholars.

Q: The most challenging?
A: Teaching is easy, but it’s hard to evaluate and grade someone else’s work.

Q: What would people be surprised to learn about you?
A: Like Forrest Gump, I’ve been in the right place at the right time. I’ve met the Emperor and Empress of Japan, the President of Taiwan, investor Warren Buffett and children’s author Maurice Sendak; and I’ve had lunch with news broadcaster Tom Brokaw. I was also housemates with Ginni Lamp, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas’ wife.

Q: What’s the first thing you did when you got out of quarantine?
A: Hug my family. My son is on the verge of completing his first year at UMW, and one of my daughters just received her UMW acceptance letter!

Larus Comments on Presidents Suspending Constitutional Rights During Crises

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Larus

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Larus

Elizabeth Larus, professor of political science and international affairs, contributed to an article entitled, “Can President Trump suspend constitutional rights of Americans due to the coronavirus crisis? Experts say unlikely,” on MEAWW.com.

“There has been talk of suspending the Constitution during times of crisis, such as President Abraham Lincoln’s suspension of habeas corpus and Franklin D. Roosevelt’s extraordinary wartime powers, such as the internment of Americans of Japanese descent,” Elizabeth Freund Larus, Professor of Department of Political Science, University of Mary Washington told MEA WorldWide (MEAWW).

“Americans have (sometimes grudgingly, sometimes willingly) acquiesced to enhanced executive power during times of national crisis, with the understanding that things ‘get back to normal’ once the crisis has passed. This, in fact, happened during WWII. However, that was when Americans had faith in our government. Americans no longer have that level of trust in the federal government,” she said. Read more.

Can President Trump suspend constitutional rights of Americans due to coronavirus crisis? Experts say unlikely (MEAWW)

UMW Fulbright professor evacuated from Poland (The Free Lance-Star)

Larus Offers Guest Lecture on Impeachment at Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, Poland

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Freund Larus

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Freund Larus

Elizabeth Freund Larus, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, offered an open lecture “U.S. Impeachment: Presidents and Process” at the Doctoral School of the University of Marie Curie-Skłodowska in Lublin, Poland. Professor Larus is a Fulbright Research Scholar at UMCS in Spring 2020. Her lecture introduced faculty and graduate students to impeachment provisions in the U.S. Constitution and walked them through the impeachment process. She then compared and contrasted the impeachment cases of U.S. presidents Andrew Johnson, Bill Clinton, and Donald Trump. Dr. Larus’ presentation was followed by robust Q&A and discussion of U.S. presidential and congressional politics. Graduate students from Poland, Ukraine, and Nigeria participated in discussion.

Larus Participates in Seminar on South China Sea Disputes

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Larus

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Elizabeth Larus

Elizabeth Freund Larus, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, participated in the seminar “Regional and Global Implications of Territorial Disputes in the South China Sea,” at the University of Warsaw, Poland, on February 21, 2020. Dr. Larus joined scholars from the University of Warsaw, the Warsaw School of Economics, and Marie Curie-Skłowdowska University for a discussion of legal aspects of the disputes and the increasing militarization of the South China Sea. Guest speaker Professor Stanislaw Pawlak, a judge on the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea, commented on the Philippines’ case against China’s claims, and the landmark 2016 arbitral decision in favor of the Philippines. Dr. Larus commented on Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte’s recent decision not to renew the Visiting Forces Agreement (VFA) with the United States. Dr. Larus claimed that the failure to renew the VFA was the most serious threat to the nearly 70-year military alliance that the United States has with the Philippines. She continued that the U.S. loss was China’s gain, and that the lack of VFA threatens the Philippines’s domestic security as well as the security of the Asia-Pacific. Professor Larus also commented on recent Freedom of Navigation Operations in the South China Sea carried out by the UK’s Royal Navy. She claimed that the UK has maintained interest in Southeast Asia since the colonial era, and as a sea power, is determined to maintain freedom of the seas, even after Brexit. Comments were followed by discussion with scholars from Poland, the United States, and New Zealand.