June 26, 2019

McMillan Publishes Book Chapter

Lauren McMillan

Assistant Professor Lauren McMillan

Lauren McMillan, assistant professor in the department of Historic Preservation, published a co-authored book chapter, “Reanalyzing, Reinterpreting, and Rediscovering the Appamattucks Community” in the edited volume New Life for Archaeological Collections.

About the book:

“New Life for Archaeological Collections explores solutions to what archaeologists are calling the “curation crisis,” that is, too much stuff with too little research, analysis, and public interpretation. This volume demonstrates how archaeologists are taking both large and small steps toward not only solving the dilemma of storage but recognizing the value of these collections through inventorying and cataloging, curation, rehousing, artifact conservation, volunteer and student efforts, and public exhibits.”

Read more.

 

McMillan and Students Present Research

Lauren McMillan

Assistant Professor Lauren McMillan, Department of Historic Preservation

Lauren McMillan, assistant professor in the Department of Historic Preservation, and five students presented at the Middle Atlantic Archaeological Conference on March 22 and 23. McMillan presented a paper entitled: “Native Pipe Making and Use in the Rappahannock River Valley.”

Student papers included:

  • Shannon Bremer, “A Soldier’s Words: Literacy and Writing at Sherwood Forest Plantation (44ST615) during the Civil War.”
  • Delaney Resweber, “Stratford Hall: An Analysis of Yard Space at the West Field and Oval Site.”
  • Olivia Larson, “Debitage Analysis and Interpretation of a Prehistoric Site in Burlington County, New Jersey.”
  • Elizabeth O’Meara, “Personal Adornment in the 17th Century at Nomini Plantation (44WM12).”
  • Ethan Knick, “Facing a Mystery: Exploring the Presence of a Lone Native American Anthropomorphic Effigy from a 17th-Century Virginia Plantation.”

Henry and McMillan Present on Teaching Historic Sites

Assistant Professor Christine Henry

Assistant Professor Christine Henry

Lauren McMillan

Assistant Professor Lauren McMillan

Christine Henry and Lauren McMillan, assistant professors of Historic Preservation, presented at the Virginia Consortium of Early Americanists on January 26th. They both served on the Designing Courses That Focus on Historic Sites panel. ​

McMillan Presents Research at Archaeology Conference

Lauren McMillan

Lauren McMillan

Lauren McMillan, assistant professor in the Department of Historic Preservation, presented research at the Society for Historical Archaeology conference in St. Charles, MO. McMillan presented a paper entitled “‘…near the side of an Indian field commonly known as the Pipemaker’s field:’ Reanalyzing the Nomini Plantation Midden Assemblage.” This research paper develop from a grant awarded by the Virginia Department of Historic Resources. She was also a panelist in a forum focused on unique and unusual artifacts and served as a member of the Nominations and Elections Committee.

McMillan Elected to International Archaeological Committee

Lauren McMillan, Assistant Professor in the Department of Historic Preservation, was elected to serve on the Nominations and Election Committee for the Society for Historical Archaeology, the lead organization for post-medieval archaeology in the world. This is a three-year position, from 2019-2021. The Society for Historical Archaeology is an international organization and is the largest scholarly group focused on the archaeology of the modern world (A.D. 1400-present).

Lauren McMillan Presents on the Rappahannock Indigenous Cultural Landscape Project

Lauren McMillan, assistant professor in the Department of Historic Preservation, presented at the Rappahannock Native American Day on November 17th as part of the Rappahannock Tribe of Virginia’s celebration of Native American Heritage Month. The audience included the chief and members of the Rappahannock Tribe, the Secretary of the Commonwealth, representatives from the National Park Service, and other members of the public.

McMillan presented research resulting from the Field Methods in Archaeology course taught in the summer 2018 session, in which she and students partnered with the Rappahannock Tribe and St. Mary’s College of Maryland on the Rappahannock Indigenous Cultural Landscape Project. McMillan’s specific area of research focuses on the study of clay tobacco pipes and their decorative motifs to understand trade, interaction spheres, identity formation, and consumer choice.