April 18, 2021

Mary Talks: “Preservation of an American Theme Park”

Mary Talks, Christine Henry

Join us ONLINE for the final Mary Talk of the 2020-21 academic year!

Amusement parks have held a special allure for Americans as places to gather, relax, and have fun. During the baby boom, more family-oriented theme parks were developed. But besides Disneyland, few of these fairy-tale playlands survived into the 21st Century.

Dr. Christine Henry, assistant professor of historic preservation, will share the case study of one theme park as she presents “Storybook Ending: Preservation of an American Theme Park.” Using vintage postcards, images, and newspapers, Professor Henry will discuss the evolution of American leisure, focusing on the surprising tale of a baby-boom-era park, The Enchanted Forest in Ellicott City, Maryland. It’s a story worthy of Mother Goose herself.

Wednesday, April 28
7:30-9:00 p.m. (EDT)
Online (via Zoom)

To watch the Talk online, register here. You then will receive a link to the streaming video, which can be watched live or at a later time. You also will have the opportunity to submit questions to be asked of the speaker at the end of the Talk.

We look forward to seeing you online!

Register

Henry Discusses History of Roadside Attractions on C-SPAN Podcast

Assistant Professor of Historic Preservation Christine Henry

Assistant Professor of Historic Preservation Christine Henry

Assistant Professor of Historic Preservation Christine Henry appeared on C-SPAN’s Lectures in History podcast, discussing the history of roadside attractions and her own experience traveling to a freshwater pond in Ohio called the Blue Hole. Listen here.

McMillan Quoted in the New York Times

Assistant Professor of Historic Preservation Lauren McMillan

Assistant Professor of Historic Preservation Lauren McMillan

Lauren McMillan, assistant professor in the department of historic preservation, was recently quoted in a New York Times story entitled “Roanoke’s ‘Lost Colony’ Was Never Lost, New Book Says.”

McMillan Publishes Book Chapter

Lauren McMillan

Assistant Professor of Historic Preservation Lauren McMillan

Lauren McMillan, assistant professor in the Department of Historic Preservation, published a book chapter entitled “Diamonds and Triangles: Two Locally-Made Pipes from the 17th-century Chesapeake” in the book Artifacts that Enlighten: The Ordinary and the Unexpected. The chapter examines the multi-racial and ethnic influences of clay tobacco pipe making in colonial Virginia.

UMW Community Works with City on Freedom Rides Historical Marker

Last fall, UMW students and city residents retraced the route of the Freedom Rides, the historic protest to desegregate interstate travel, organized by James Farmer. Members of the UMW community are working with the City to establish a historic marker on the site of the old bus station in Fredericksburg, the Freedom Riders' first stop on their 1961 trip. Photo by Lynda Allen.

Last fall, UMW students and city residents retraced the route of the Freedom Rides, the historic protest to desegregate interstate travel, organized by James Farmer. Members of the UMW community are working with the City to establish a historic marker on the site of the old bus station in Fredericksburg, the Freedom Riders’ first stop on their 1961 trip. Photo by Lynda Allen.

James Farmer Multicultural Center Assistant Director Chris Williams, Assistant Professor of History Erin Devlin and Assistant Professor of Historic Preservation Christine Henry were interviewed in The Free Lance-Star about their efforts to work with the City of Fredericksburg to establish a Virginia state historical marker at the site of the old bus station where the Freedom Riders stopped first in their quest to desegregate interstate transportation in 1961. The station formerly stood on the corner of Princess Anne and Wolfe streets, near where the fire station is now.

Some of the riders were arrested in North Carolina, South Carolina and Mississippi. In Anniston, Ala., a mob of Ku Klux Klan members slashed the bus’s tires as it attempted to leave the terminal, and later threw a firebomb at it.

UMW students and staff and community members visited the field where the bombing occurred last fall, as part of a trip recreating the journey of the Freedom Riders.

“To our surprise, there was no marker out there. No historical marker saying that right here, the original 13 Freedom Riders were fire-bombed,” said Chris Williams, assistant director of UMW’s James Farmer Multicultural Center, which organized the trip. “I was enraged and so were the students.”

Back home in Fredericksburg, Williams was still thinking about ways the story of the Freedom Riders and James Farmer could be told better—and that led to the idea of placing a highway marker at the site of the old bus station.

Williams, Devlin and Henry, in partnership with the City of Fredericksburg, have started the process of applying for the marker from the state Department of Historical Resources. Read more.

McMillan Elected President of Archaeological Conference

Lauren McMillan

Assistant Professor of Historic Preservation Lauren McMillan

Lauren McMillan, assistant professor of historic preservation, was recently elected president of the Middle Atlantic Archaeological Conference. She will serve as the president-elect until March 2021, at which time she will transition into the president position. The Middle Atlantic Archaeological Conference facilitates a yearly conference and professional journal for archaeologists working the Mid-Atlantic region. McMillan has been a member of this conference since 2007, while a student at UMW, and has previously served as the program chair, social media chair, and as a student paper judge.

Faculty, Students Select Center for Historic Preservation Book Prize

Preservation and Place: Historic Preservation by and of LGBTQ Communities in the United States, edited by Katherine Crawford-Lackey and Megan E. Springate.

Preservation and Place:
Historic Preservation by and of LGBTQ Communities in the United States, edited by Katherine Crawford-Lackey and Megan E. Springate.

The jury for the Center for Historic Preservation Book Prize recently met over Zoom and selected this year’s winner. The make up of the jury and a blurb about the book are below. Details about the Book Prize can be found here: https://cas.umw.edu/hisp/chp/book-prize/

University of Mary Washington Center for Historic Preservation Book Prize

2020 Book Prize Winner:
Preservation and Place: Historic Preservation by and of LGBTQ Communities in the United States, edited by Katherine Crawford-Lackey and Megan E. Springate

Book Prize Jury:
Paloma Bolasny, UMW class of 2006
Youth Programs Coordinator, Cultural Resources Office of Interpretation and Education
National Park Service

Lily Eghtessad, UMW class of 2020
Student/Knight Fellow
University of Mary Washington, Department of Historic Preservation

Michael J. Emmons, Jr.
Assistant Director, Center for Historic Architecture & Design
University of Delaware, Biden School of Public Policy and Administration

Daniel Hubbard, CPA, PhD
Associate Professor
University of Mary Washington, Department of Historic Preservation

Lauren McMillan, PhD (Chair)
Assistant Professor
University of Mary Washington, Department of Historic Preservation

Bryan Orthel, PhD
Associate Professor of Design
Indiana University Bloomington, Eskenazi School of Art, Architecture + Design

Preservation and Place: Historic Preservation by and of LGBTQ Communities in the United States is a groundbreaking volume that starts a new conversation within the historic preservation profession. The editors and contributing authors explore various aspects of preservation of historic, cultural, and archaeological sites of LGBTQ communities across the United States. This timely volume advances topics little represented within the literature, or within the discipline in general, providing a context and model for other preservationists who wish to research and interpret sites associated with LGBTQ history. One of the more innovative aspects of this volume is that it was written to engage multiple audiences: practitioners, academics, advocates, students, and anyone who wants to employ inclusive and diverse preservation practices. Through multiple case studies, Preservation and Place helps to open new avenues to explore within the field of historic preservation, providing a useful and innovative handbook.

Spencer to Give Talk Feb. 13 at Branch Museum in Richmond

Michael Spencer, associate professor and director for the Center for Historic Preservation

Michael Spencer, associate professor and director for the Center for Historic Preservation

This evening, Thursday, Feb. 13 at 6 p.m., Michael Spencer, associate professor and chair of the Department of Historic Preservation, will give a talk at the Branch Museum of Architecture and Design in Richmond, focusing on Charles M. Robinson’s designs for institutions of higher education in Virginia. More information and tickets ($20, or $10 for Branch members) can be found here: https://branchmuseum.org/calendar/

Spencer Leads Gallery Talk at The Branch in Richmond, Nov. 9

Michael Spencer, associate professor and director for the Center for Historic Preservation

Michael Spencer, associate professor and director for the Center for Historic Preservation

Michael Spencer, Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Historic Preservation, will lead a Gallery Talk at The Branch Museum of Architecture and Design in Richmond on Saturday, Nov. 9 at 4 p.m. Titled “Charles Robinson’s Higher Calling,” the talk will focus on Charles M. Robinson’s designs for institutions of higher education in Virginia. Tickets are $20 for Branch non-members and $10 for members. https://branchmuseum.org/

McMillan Discussed Experimental Archaeology on Town Talk

Lauren McMillan

Assistant Professor Lauren McMillan

Lauren McMillan, assistant professor of historic preservation, was a guest on the Town Talk radio show on October 22nd. McMillan discussed the Reconstructive and Experimental Archaeology Conference, that is being hosted at UMW on October 25th.

https://www.newstalk1230.net/episode/town-talk-oct-22-2/

https://exarc.net/meetings/rearc