July 2, 2020

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s latest column deals with being flexible with working, teaching and learning remotely. Read PIVOT QUICKLY.

 

I love change.

But I know the world does not embrace change the way I do, so it’s been amazing to see how, when under the gun, people pivot within days to change how they deliver their work.

Unless you work in grocery or a hospital, or drive trucks, you are probably teleworking or have dramatically changed how you deliver your product.

Has it been fun? No. But it’s been necessary, and we’ve seen people step up and—dare I say—surprise themselves at how they’ve been able to pivot quickly. While the delivery of their product or service may not be the same quality or meet the same set of expectations as before COVID-19, it’s been pretty darn good. And that’s been fun to watch, even if it hasn’t been fun to execute.

Look at K–12 and higher education. Both are educating students online now. Yes, parents have picked up much of the K–12 responsibilities, but the teachers are helping them by creating expectations and sharing lesson plans. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s latest column deals with the ‘new normal’ of staying home. Read LIVING AND WORKING IN A NEW, VIRTUAL REALITY.

 

While watching television one night, I saw a commercial for home grocery delivery.

“Soon, we won’t have to leave our house for any reason,” I said to my husband.

We can get our entertainment at home, and professional development and education through our computers. While going to the gym is nice, some of us have home gyms or use videos or online exercise classes. I can download books through free services from my public library or have a subscription service provide me with everything I want to read. Our news is delivered online. I can use TeleMed for many medical needs.

Then there’s food delivery. In addition to the tried-and-true pizza delivery options, we now have companies like GrubHub and DoorDash. Retailers allow you to order online and have products delivered to your door. Need some clothing? It’s just a click away. You can stay home and enjoy your worship service online or on television, too. Some organizations have allowed employees to telework, at least occasionally, for years. And now you can get your groceries delivered? Why would I ever need to leave home?

Fast forward a couple of months, and we are living this reality. I certainly never expected to have to stay home, but we’re doing it. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses the importance of body language. Read NONVERBAL SIGNALS SPEAK VOLUMES.

 

Did you know research shows that your body language, or nonverbal messaging, speaks louder to people than the words you say?

Some believe 55 percent of communication is nonverbal. Within that remaining 45 percent, only 7 percent of communication is attributed to the words. The remaining 38 percent comes from tone, pitch, loudness and other attributes related to how the words are said.

Here’s an illustration I use in my professional selling class, one that everyone can relate to. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses the importance of following your dreams. Read BELIEVE AND PERSEVERE.

 

Many years ago, I had a colleague whose husband was part of the coaching staff of a women’s Division I basketball team. He was good at his job, but had a dream of coaching individuals.

A few years later, he took a leap of faith—with the support of his wife—and followed his dream. Today he works with high school, college and NBA players. Getting there, however, was a challenge. He experienced doubts, fears, frustrations, struggles, and financial shortcomings. The only things that were consistent through the nine years between when he began his business and today were his faith and his passion to make players better, no matter their level of play.

His story affected me on many levels. It doesn’t matter where you are and what you are doing in life, you must believe in yourself to get where you want to be. As an educator, I often see young people who do not believe in themselves. Because they do not, they have no direction. They are waiting for life to happen. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses people who aren’t approachable in the workplace. Read DO YOU HAVE A ‘NO’ FACE OR A ‘YES’ FACE?

 

I recently heard an impactful story. Perhaps it might touch you.

Thomas Jefferson was traveling by horseback with a group of colleagues. As they approached a river, they met others at the river who were on foot. The river had overflowed its banks and the current was swift. To cross the river was going to be a bit dangerous.

A lone foot traveler approached President Jefferson and asked if he would take him across. The president agreed immediately and the man climbed behind him on the horse. They safely crossed the treacherous river.

Afterwards, another person asked the lone traveler, “Why did you ask the president of the United States to take you across the river?” The man, with a shocked look on his face, admitted he had no idea that he had asked the president of the United States. “All I knew,” he said, “is that on some of your faces was written the answer ‘no’ and on some of them was the answer ‘yes.’ His was a ‘yes’ face.”

Do you have a “no” face or a “yes” face?

Think about your workplace. Are there people you interact with who are no-face people? I’m guessing there are more than a few. They tell you, with their facial expressions, not to approach them. And if you must approach them, you know if you have to ask them to do something, the answer will be no. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses why you should LISTEN TO YOUR GUT.

 

WE ALL have gut feelings. But how often do we follow them?

I’m amazed at how people do something that will probably not be in their best interest and later say they knew it was a mistake. It’s an epidemic of not listening to our instincts.

It could be a high-profile decision that will probably not play well in the court of public opinion. I’m thinking specifically of the Houston Astros and their sign-stealing scheme. Stealing signs in baseball is nothing new, but using technology is totally out of bounds. So the owner of the team fired both the coach and the general manager immediately, and two other Major League managers, both previously affiliated with the Astros, lost their jobs as well. Read more.

College of Business Presents Money Matters, Tuesdays in March

Adulting is HARD, and one of the hardest parts is learning money management. That’s why the College of Business is introducing a new program called Money Matters to teach students (and faculty and staff!) some of the basics! Topics include budgeting, saving, loans, insurance, taxes, and more. These sessions are free to attend and led by UMW faculty and alumni.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses how SHOWING APPRECIATION MATTERS.

ADAM GRANT, author of the bestselling book “Give and Take,” says, “A sense of appreciation is the single most sustainable motivator at work.”

The key word in that sentence is “sustainable.”

In psychology, we talk about extrinsic and intrinsic motivators. Extrinsic motivators include things like salary, benefits, titles, and appreciation. Intrinsic motivators are internal to the person and include work ethic and pride. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses ETHICS IN THE WORKPLACE.

I recently had one of the most energizing and challenging experiences I have had in my 30-plus years in higher education. Two of my colleagues and I taught—or perhaps the more appropriate word is facilitated—a business ethics course.

Our backgrounds were similar, yet very different. One of my colleagues is a philosophy professor and the other is an accountant. My expertise is marketing. So we brought quite a variety of experiences and perspectives to the classroom.

The philosophy professor shared the ethical theories of utilitarianism, deontology, and virtue ethics with us, giving us an excellent foundation from which to talk about business ethics. Her challenge to the students was to figure out for themselves what they valued by the end of the class. I’m not sure most of them understand what she meant by that at first, but they figured it out as the course unfolded. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

Most of the people we know have amazing networks.

Your own network consists of relatives, friends from childhood, friends from school, and work colleagues. Then there are those from your faith-based organization, your volunteer work, and your interest groups. You know a lot of people. We all do.

But have you ever thought of this group from a strategic standpoint? And I don’t mean strategic only from your perspective. You can be a strategic connection for others, too. Members of your network can help you connect to a job. But you too can be a connector for people. Read more.