November 30, 2020

Leading from the top, middle, and back (The Free Lance-Star)

Rethinking recommendation questions (The Free Lance-Star)

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s column in The Free Lance-Star explores ways women and men are treated differently during the interview process. Read RETHINKING RECOMMENDATION QUESTIONS.

DURING the last decade or so, we have been made aware of the disparities between men and women in senior roles in organizations. We have also read many articles and shared anecdotes about how men and women manage and lead differently. And who can forget “Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus” to explain differences between the genders?

The status quo has been challenged over and over. But we still have work to do.

For example, a female friend in a senior role at another university shared a story with me. Susan served as a reference for another woman. That woman, let’s call her Dana, was a finalist for a senior position at another university. Susan received the reference call from a man named Dave. During the call, Dave asked many of the standard reference check questions and Susan ably responded. And then Dave asked, “Do you think Dana comes across as very likeable?” Susan replied, “Well, what exactly do you mean? Read more.

Recharging your Batteries (The Free Lance-Star)

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson discusses when it’s time to consider getting a new job in “RUN TO A JOB, NOT AWAY FROM ONE.”

A recent conversation struck a chord with me. A young person I know is not happy, but also not unhappy, with her job, so we discussed whether she should leave. There are so many variables to consider.

My advice is to never quit a job until you have a new job, with one caveat: If you feel unsafe in your work, you should quit immediately. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s latest column in The Free Lance-Star is entitled, “CONSIDER THE SOURCE.”

Say you just got some disturbing feedback through the back channels of your organization. According to this feedback, your latest decision was a knee-jerk reaction that was ill-informed. Based on what you’ve been told, you don’t have a brain in your head. If you did, how in the world could you think your decision was the right one? You are totally clueless.

You’re not feeling too good right now, are you? You’re probably doubting not only this decision, but every one you’ve ever made in your life.

But wait! What is the source of this feedback?

Why would that matter? Because you should always consider the source of feedback before beating yourself up—or, conversely, thinking you’re fabulous. Read more.

RICHARDSON: When nothing is going right (The Free Lance-Star)

RICHARDSON: Decide that you can (The Free Lance-Star)

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s latest column in The Free Lance-Star is entitled, “DECIDE THAT YOU CAN.”

 

At the 1952 Helsinki Olympics, Great Britain’s Roger Bannister finished the 1,500 meters in fourth place. He determined then that he wanted to be the first person in history to run a mile in less than four minutes.

Why was that a big deal? Because it never had been done. In fact, people thought it was impossible.

But Roger set his goal, created a practice schedule (while training as a doctor), and in 1954 ran the mile in 3 minutes, 59.4 seconds. Bannister had achieved the unthinkable.

After Bannister broke the 4-minute mark, others broke it. Since 1954, more than 1,500 runners have broken the 4-minute mile; the record today is 3:43.13, held by Hicham El Guerrouj.

So many times, we decide that things cannot be done. It becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. If we don’t believe we can do something different, we want to be right, so we have a mindset that ensures something different is never done. Bannister was told he couldn’t run a mile in less than 4 minutes. He could have accepted it, but he didn’t.

His mindset was such that he determined he could, so he did. And we can do the same. Read more.

RICHARDSON: Ridiculous expectations for job candidates (The Free Lance-Star)