May 9, 2021

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s latest column in The Free Lance-Star is entitled, “Aids to ensure better productivity.”

I WEAR hearing aids. Most people are surprised to learn this. They are not only surprised I wear them—and have for more than 15 years—but that I share that I wear them. Evidently, I’m supposed to be embarrassed that I wear them. I’m not.

I also wear glasses or contact lenses. Obviously, people can see when I wear glasses, and I was called “four eyes” as a child. Today, no one seems to care. There’s no stigma attached to wearing glasses.

But it seems some people think I should feel shame that I wear hearing aids. I’m actually proud that I’m smart enough to know that hearing aids help me, both professionally and personally. Read more.

Using data to grow or go (The Free Lance-Star)

Properly prepare for the future (The Free Lance-Star)

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s latest column in The Free Lance-Star is titled “Using data to grow or go.”

WHEN I take a new management position, I get to know the people I am working with. Then I look at data.

Data gives you a ton of insight into how effectively an organization is being managed. But you must understand what the data is telling you, and then act on it, if it’s to be useful. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s latest column in The Free Lance-Star is entitled, “Taking Too Long on Searches.”

RECRUITMENT is challenging in the best of times. But during a pandemic, it seems like searching for new employees has gotten ridiculous.

I’ve hired a lot people in my higher education career. Before we begin searches, we sit down and map out the recruitment plan. We include everything from who will be involved in the hiring process to where we will advertise for the position to the timetable we expect to follow. Evidently, planning all of this is not what many organizations do or if they do plan, they don’t stick to the plan. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s latest column in The Free Lance-Star is titled “Gender Inequity or COVID Craziness?”

MABEL was promoted several months ago after the previous person in the job, Jack, was asked to leave. Mabel wasn’t sure she wanted the position permanently, so asked if she could do it for a year. Towards the end of that year, she and her boss would have a discussion about her future. That time is approaching, and Mabel reached out to me to discuss some concerns.

When Mabel was asked to do the job, she learned that Jack’s salary had been $125,000. Yet Mabel was offered $85,000 to do the same job—a $23,000 pay increase for her. She was told that the lower salary was due to a COVID-19-related decline in revenue. The organization just could not afford to pay Mabel what it had paid Jack.

She asked me if I thought the lower salary was gender-related. I had no clue, as I don’t know her boss. I also don’t know how hard her organization has been hit financially by COVID. It is plausible that her supervisor is being truthful with her. It’s also possible they thought the organization could pay her less because she’s a woman.

She loves the work and wants to continue in the position, and has gotten strong hints from her supervisor that he wants her to continue. So what should she do? Read more. 

How to handle your email (The Free Lance-Star)

How can you measure greatness? (The Free Lance-Star)

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s latest column in The Free Lance-Star is entitled, “How to Handle Your Email.”

WE LIVE in a world of instant gratification.

When I think of my childhood, I remember having to wait until 6 p.m. or 10 p.m. to watch the news on television to learn what was going on in the world. But now we learn about something seconds after it happens.

We once had to wait, with great anticipation, for our favorite show on Thursday night. And the cliffhangers for those shows? We had to wait an entire season to find out what happened! In the age of Netflix, we can binge watch season after season in a weekend. We don’t have to wait for many things today.

Emails are a blessing and a curse when it comes to instant gratification. Most people will tell you that, in order to manage your time well, you should block out times of the day to attend to your emails. For example, maybe you begin the day cleaning up your email box from the last time you responded. And then later in the day, you attend to them in another time block (say, 2–2:30 or at the end of the workday). I know a few people who follow this model successfully. Read more.

Two basic management styles (The Free Lance-Star)