January 23, 2020

The rules don’t apply to Me (The Free Lance-Star)

A Small Team can be Enough (The Free Lance-Star)

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses the advantages of having fewer employees. Read A SMALL TEAM CAN BE ENOUGH.

 

A FRIEND’S volleyball team recently won a national championship. As I watched the elite eight, the commentator kept reminding us that the team had only 10 players. That is a fairly small team in volleyball circles, where most teams have at least 15 players.

Despite having only 10 players, his team ultimately won the national championship and had a perfect record for the year in doing so. So it got me thinking.

The size of the team doesn’t really matter—in sports or in the workplace—if you have the right people. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star explores UNCONSCIOUS BIAS AND ASSUMPTIONS.

 

We’re hearing more and more about unconscious bias in the workplace. That’s caused me to think about where I have seen and, unfortunately, continue to see, assumptions made because of unconscious bias.

First, what is unconscious bias? It has to do with how we see the world through our own lens because of how we were raised. As a white woman, for example, I see the world differently than I would had I been born Asian American or African American. And I certainly see and experience life differently than if I had been born and raised as a man. Unconscious bias also includes many other attributes, including sexual orientation, age, and religious preferences. And the reality is that each of us is biased. Read more. 

Titles and leaders (The Free Lance-Star)

Trust, but verify (The Free Lance-Star)

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star explores how business owners should manage the people who handle the books. Read TRUST, BUT VERIFY.

 

TOO OFTEN, I read about organizations that have employees embezzle money. In the last year in my community, an organization had it happen to them for the second time in about five years. That really makes me scratch my head.

I am biased as a business school person, but shouldn’t everyone know a little bit about business? And if it’s a business you own, wouldn’t you really want to understand what’s going on?

I have a friend who is fond of saying, ‘trust, but verify.’ I think he’s onto something. Read more. 

 

Friendly, not friends (The Free Lance-Star)

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star tackles how to navigate boss-employee workplace friendships. Read FRIENDLY, NOT FRIENDS.

 

YOU’RE THE BOSS in your organization. How do you interact with your employees? Are you friends with your staff or just friendly?

How did you become the boss? In many organizations, people are promoted from within—which generally is a good thing. Sometimes the boss is hired from outside the organization, which can be a good practice too, depending on the needs of the organization.

It doesn’t matter how you step into the supervisor role. When you do, you’re entering a new universe with a different set of rules. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star tackles how to have tactful conversations with students and employees about body odor and other smells in the workplace. Read DISTRACTING ODORS.

 

In the space of one week, I had the following experiences:

While walking on campus one morning, I was behind a woman who must have bathed in perfume. The smell was distinctive and strong.

Another day, I was passed by a young man who reeked of food.

Two days later, a person near me had either not bathed recently or was wearing his clothing for the umpteenth day. His body odor was unpleasant, to say the least.

It made me think about having conversations with both students (who are about to enter the workplace) and employees about the way we smell.

Read more.