July 13, 2020

RICHARDSON: Applying rules (The Free Lance-Star)

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses how to enforce regulations in a company when it comes to employees with differing abilities. Read APPLYING RULES.

 

I heard a story that broke my heart. A young man on the autism spectrum has a job in a well-known organization. He made a snack purchase on the honor system at his office break room. When he scanned the item, he hit the wrong button and ended up canceling the transaction instead of charging it. But he didn’t realize what he had done and ate the item.

Later, he was confronted about stealing the $5 item. It’s my understanding that he didn’t explain what happened well, and was placed on suspension for a week. He thought he was going to lose his job, including his important benefits.

I first became aware of the situation while he was on suspension. A relative of his had shared the story and was concerned about what might happen. While I certainly had no way of knowing why he was suspended for a week over such a transgression, I was confident that he would not lose his job over it. The relative indicated he had worked there for 2½ years, had never been late, had never called in sick and volunteered to work late. He had even won a productivity award in a previous month. Read more.

 

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses the importance of reaching out to Black employees and colleagues in the wake of George Floyd’s death. Read MANAGEMENT MATTERS: DON’T BE SILENT.

George Floyd’s senseless death on Memorial Day has caused many people of all races to find their voices. Protests are happening around the United States in communities of all sizes. While most of these happen at nights and on weekends, they impact normal work days, as well, as we work with people who are distracted and may be emotionally and perhaps physically empty.

While colleagues of all backgrounds are impacted, as a manager have you reached out to your black colleagues to see how they are doing? They are certainly the center of attention right now. Do you recognize how your black colleagues are being treated on a daily basis? Are you intentionally holding conversations about racial biases in the workplace with your coworkers?

What are your African American colleagues feeling right now? Do you know? Have you asked? If so, good for you! Only by asking will most people share. And if you haven’t asked, why haven’t you? Do you ascribe to the mindset of “if I don’t acknowledge it, it’s not happening?” The frustration and weariness among our black colleagues is real. If you don’t know that, it’s because you just aren’t paying attention. As a manager and leader, your job is to serve and support each of your subordinates, not just the ones who share your same ethnicity. Read more.

 

Management Matters: Don’t be silent (The Free Lance-Star)

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses the importance of making sure outsiders who do business with your organization understand your terminology. Read JARGON IN THE WORKPLACE.

 

Several years ago, we began a mentoring program in my business school. Students requested an alumni mentor, and we had a stable of alumni volunteers. We paired the student with someone in an area of the student’s interest.

It was up to the duo to figure out how they would meet. Many mentors were not in the local area, so most communication occurred via phone and email. But not always.

One day I ran into a local alumnus who had been matched with a student. I asked how it was going. Read more.

Create a climate for sharing (The Free Lance-Star)

College of Business Congratulates Class of 2020

UMW’s College of Business created a YouTube video to congratulate the Class of 2020, and specifically COB graduates, on completing their degrees. Compiled by Assistant Professor of Management Alexandra Dunn, the video features COB Dean Lynne Richardson, President Troy Paino and faculty from across the college.

RICHARDSON: Schedules and Boundaries (The Free Lance-Star)

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses setting routines and limits to your work schedule. Read SCHEDULES AND BOUNDARIES.

 

One of the biggest challenges of teleworking concerns schedules and boundaries. While some folks have adapted well to working from home, others would say they are failing.

Let’s start with college students. As I talked with faculty and students weekly during the last half of the spring semester, one of the recurring themes was the inability for many students to create a schedule for themselves.

It was especially difficult if the course had become asynchronous—it was not meeting at its regular time. Instead, faculty were posting videos of lectures and expecting students to watch the lectures and take quizzes or complete assignments to indicate they were “attending class,” albeit virtually. Some students, without the structure their face-to-face class schedule provided, were struggling to re-create their schedules at home. Read more.

Living below your means (The Free Lance-Star)