April 18, 2021

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s recent column in The Free Lance-Star is entitled, “Start the easy way or the hard way?”

DO YOU make lists of things that you need to get done every day? Or perhaps your time frame is weekly or longer. Most time management gurus will tell you that a ‘to-do’ list is a good way to help you maximize how you spend your day.

I’m a big fan of to-do lists. Most mornings, I generate a list of items that must be done that day. Occasionally, the list will include items that are longer term, but that need to be started soon.

Some people organize their list. Maybe they order the items by importance. Others create a list based on how much time each item will take to complete.

My list is created as I think of things to add. I do not take the time to organize it in any coherent fashion. It’s more a stream of consciousness list. I typically begin the list as soon as I get out of the shower, as I’ve usually thought of three to five things while I’m in there. Then I add to the list throughout the morning.

How do you “work” your list? Do you start with the easiest items to complete or do you tackle the hardest one first?

There is value in each method. Read more.

Status quo or need to grow? (The Free Lance-Star)

Consider the importance of what you’re juggling (The Free Lance-Star)

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s column in The Free Lance-Star is entitled, “STATUS QUO OR NEED TO GO?”

YEARS ago, I was in a meeting with the heads of about 10 manufacturing organizations in my community. One of the few memories I have of that meeting was when one of the men shared his inability to get some of his employees to accept promotions. When he said that, others nodded their heads, but I didn’t understand. So I asked.

He said most of the people who worked on the assembly line in his plant, while sometimes bored with their work, were happy to leave the plant at the end of their shift and not have to worry about work until their next shift. They loved being able to go home in the late afternoon and coach their kids’ teams, ride bikes with the family or grill out without the chance of getting a call about something happening at work. They didn’t want to be responsible for returning to work to address a problem outside their shift. They were willing to forego the opportunity to increase their pay for the freedom to leave work behind every day. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s column in The Free Lance-Star is entitled, “WHY IS THE ANSWER ALWAYS NO?”

YOU APPROACH a colleague with a request to do something in a new way. Your colleague responds immediately: “No. That’s not possible.”

Of course, it may not be possible, but perhaps it is, and your colleague just doesn’t want to investigate how it might be done. They want to keep doing it “the way it’s always been done.”

I have worked in four public institutions, each in a different state. While there are some state rules, along with some protocols from the governing groups for each state, many of the rules are just ingrained practices that each institution created. Read more.

What to do when you are not selected (The Free Lance-Star)

We learn from failure (The Free Lance-Star)

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s column in The Free Lance-Star asks managers to consider their organization’s application process. Read APPLY TO YOUR ORGANIZATION.

MANY MANAGERS complain they cannot recruit good people. Perhaps the good people don’t want to work for your organization and don’t apply, and it might not be for the reason you think.

Have you considered lately how hard it is to apply for a position in your workplace? I’m talking about the application process.

The majority of organizations today ask candidates to apply via a website. The applicant is required to upload their résumé, which is a reasonable request. But then they’re asked to essentially replicate the résumé in boxes, including information such as why they left the employer and their ending salary. If you’re a person of a certain age who has held at least 3–5 jobs, it can take several hours to populate the document with information that is most likely on your résumé. Why?

Several years ago, I was on a conference call with human resources directors from a variety of organizations and we discussed this very issue. Read more.

Also read Richardson’s other recent columns, WE LEARN FROM FAILURE, NEVER LET ‘EVERYONE’ DRIVE YOUR DECISION and THE POWER OF ENCOURAGEMENT.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s latest column in The Free Lance-Star discusses the importance of preparing employees to back each other up in their roles and responsibilities. Read WHEN REDUNDANCIES ARE GOOD.

I had been in my first dean position about two months. There were three staff members in my office supporting the administrative team. One of the members, Joyce, was on vacation for the week when I asked one of the others, Laura, if she would take care of something for me the next day. She immediately said, “That’s Joyce’s job,” and pulled out a two-page document of responsibilities in the office.

It was a “who does what” list. She showed me that Joyce’s name was beside the item I had asked her to do. I was a bit astonished. While I appreciated that they had figured out all of the tasks, I was a bit concerned that work would not get done when the responsible person was out. Read more.

Getting called on the carpet (The Free Lance-Star)