April 14, 2021

Machande to Serve as Interim Dean for the College of Business

College of Business Interim Dean Ken Machande

College of Business Interim Dean Ken Machande

The following message is from President Paino.

In December, Dr. Lynne Richardson announced that she would be retiring as the Dean of the College of Business in July of this year. After consulting with and receiving input from a number of constituencies, including the faculty and staff in the College of Business, I am very pleased to announce that Professor Ken Machande has agreed to serve as the Interim Dean of the College of Business and lead the College as we consider the plans and timing for an external search for a Dean and prepare for the next review cycle of AACSB.

Professor Machande has been a member of the faculty for nearly 20 years, has served as the Associate Dean in the College of Business since 2012, and also served as the Interim Dean of the College of Business in 2018-2019. Ken brings a wealth of experience, knowledge, and professional accomplishments to this role, and he will ensure both a smooth transition as well as further ongoing efforts to move the College of Business forward. Please join me in welcoming Ken to this role and thanking him for his willingness to further serve the University at this time.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s latest column in The Free Lance-Star is titled “Gender Inequity or COVID Craziness?”

MABEL was promoted several months ago after the previous person in the job, Jack, was asked to leave. Mabel wasn’t sure she wanted the position permanently, so asked if she could do it for a year. Towards the end of that year, she and her boss would have a discussion about her future. That time is approaching, and Mabel reached out to me to discuss some concerns.

When Mabel was asked to do the job, she learned that Jack’s salary had been $125,000. Yet Mabel was offered $85,000 to do the same job—a $23,000 pay increase for her. She was told that the lower salary was due to a COVID-19-related decline in revenue. The organization just could not afford to pay Mabel what it had paid Jack.

She asked me if I thought the lower salary was gender-related. I had no clue, as I don’t know her boss. I also don’t know how hard her organization has been hit financially by COVID. It is plausible that her supervisor is being truthful with her. It’s also possible they thought the organization could pay her less because she’s a woman.

She loves the work and wants to continue in the position, and has gotten strong hints from her supervisor that he wants her to continue. So what should she do? Read more. 

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s latest column in The Free Lance-Star is entitled, “How to Handle Your Email.”

WE LIVE in a world of instant gratification.

When I think of my childhood, I remember having to wait until 6 p.m. or 10 p.m. to watch the news on television to learn what was going on in the world. But now we learn about something seconds after it happens.

We once had to wait, with great anticipation, for our favorite show on Thursday night. And the cliffhangers for those shows? We had to wait an entire season to find out what happened! In the age of Netflix, we can binge watch season after season in a weekend. We don’t have to wait for many things today.

Emails are a blessing and a curse when it comes to instant gratification. Most people will tell you that, in order to manage your time well, you should block out times of the day to attend to your emails. For example, maybe you begin the day cleaning up your email box from the last time you responded. And then later in the day, you attend to them in another time block (say, 2–2:30 or at the end of the workday). I know a few people who follow this model successfully. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s latest column in The Free Lance-Star is entitled, “Two Basic Management Styles.”

I KNOW, and have known, many business deans. Through those professional relationships, I’ve learned something that applies to my industry, but also to plenty of other industries.

Managers either work sequentially or concurrently. What do I mean? I’ll use my own experiences to illustrate. Either method can work, but what is best depends on what the organization needs.

Any manager should expect a learning curve, and a honeymoon period, when they start at a new job. People will cut you slack as you figure out what your job actually is and how to most effectively do it. But after three to six months, folks expect to start seeing some action. Perhaps new initiatives begin or a tough decision is made regarding how work is done. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s recent column in The Free Lance-Star is entitled, “Start the easy way or the hard way?”

DO YOU make lists of things that you need to get done every day? Or perhaps your time frame is weekly or longer. Most time management gurus will tell you that a ‘to-do’ list is a good way to help you maximize how you spend your day.

I’m a big fan of to-do lists. Most mornings, I generate a list of items that must be done that day. Occasionally, the list will include items that are longer term, but that need to be started soon.

Some people organize their list. Maybe they order the items by importance. Others create a list based on how much time each item will take to complete.

My list is created as I think of things to add. I do not take the time to organize it in any coherent fashion. It’s more a stream of consciousness list. I typically begin the list as soon as I get out of the shower, as I’ve usually thought of three to five things while I’m in there. Then I add to the list throughout the morning.

How do you “work” your list? Do you start with the easiest items to complete or do you tackle the hardest one first?

There is value in each method. Read more.

COB Events

The College of Business is hosting its Money Matters series every Wednesday for the next three weeks. Each session focuses on financial responsibility, and is held virtually via Zoom

Upcoming Money Matters events include:

02/17 @ 7 pm: Credit Cards, Loans, and Credit Scores with Dean Lynne Richardson
02/24 @ 7 pm: Insurance with Rob Whitt ’93
03/03@ 7 pm: Saving and Retiring Planning with Chris Fines ’99

The COB welcomes all students to attend these events. To register, please email Lucy Quann at lquann@umw.edu.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s column in The Free Lance-Star is entitled, “STATUS QUO OR NEED TO GO?”

YEARS ago, I was in a meeting with the heads of about 10 manufacturing organizations in my community. One of the few memories I have of that meeting was when one of the men shared his inability to get some of his employees to accept promotions. When he said that, others nodded their heads, but I didn’t understand. So I asked.

He said most of the people who worked on the assembly line in his plant, while sometimes bored with their work, were happy to leave the plant at the end of their shift and not have to worry about work until their next shift. They loved being able to go home in the late afternoon and coach their kids’ teams, ride bikes with the family or grill out without the chance of getting a call about something happening at work. They didn’t want to be responsible for returning to work to address a problem outside their shift. They were willing to forego the opportunity to increase their pay for the freedom to leave work behind every day. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s column in The Free Lance-Star is entitled, “WHY IS THE ANSWER ALWAYS NO?”

YOU APPROACH a colleague with a request to do something in a new way. Your colleague responds immediately: “No. That’s not possible.”

Of course, it may not be possible, but perhaps it is, and your colleague just doesn’t want to investigate how it might be done. They want to keep doing it “the way it’s always been done.”

I have worked in four public institutions, each in a different state. While there are some state rules, along with some protocols from the governing groups for each state, many of the rules are just ingrained practices that each institution created. Read more.

Majid Interviewed by Wallet Hub on Car Insurance Marketing

Associate Professor of Marketing Kashef Majid

Associate Professor of Marketing Kashef Majid

Associate Professor of Marketing Kashef Majid was recently interviewed for a feature on WalletHub.com on car insurance. Majid provided insight into the ways COVID-19 has impacted car insurance companies and how these companies target consumers through celebrity endorsements.

How do you think COVID-19 has affected consumer demand for car insurance?

At a large scale, COVID-19 has harmed the economy which would trickle into demand for cars and subsequently insurance. On a more micro-level what this has done is made people more cognizant about how much they are paying for car insurance so I would expect more consumers to reevaluate how much they are paying for car insurance. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s column in The Free Lance-Star asks managers to consider their organization’s application process. Read APPLY TO YOUR ORGANIZATION.

MANY MANAGERS complain they cannot recruit good people. Perhaps the good people don’t want to work for your organization and don’t apply, and it might not be for the reason you think.

Have you considered lately how hard it is to apply for a position in your workplace? I’m talking about the application process.

The majority of organizations today ask candidates to apply via a website. The applicant is required to upload their résumé, which is a reasonable request. But then they’re asked to essentially replicate the résumé in boxes, including information such as why they left the employer and their ending salary. If you’re a person of a certain age who has held at least 3–5 jobs, it can take several hours to populate the document with information that is most likely on your résumé. Why?

Several years ago, I was on a conference call with human resources directors from a variety of organizations and we discussed this very issue. Read more.

Also read Richardson’s other recent columns, WE LEARN FROM FAILURE, NEVER LET ‘EVERYONE’ DRIVE YOUR DECISION and THE POWER OF ENCOURAGEMENT.