May 20, 2022

Yoon Receives Prestigious Journal of Consumer Psychology Award

Assistant Professor of Marketing Kelly Eunjung Yoon

Assistant Professor of Marketing Kelly Eunjung Yoon

Assistant Professor of Marketing Kelly Yoon was chosen to receive the Journal of Consumer Psychology’s 2022 Early Career Contributor Award, based on her paper, “Perceived Costs versus Actual Benefits of Demographic Self-Disclosure in Online Support Groups,” published in the 2021 (31/3) volume of Journal of Consumer Psychology.

This JCP Early Career Contributor Award is given to the best refereed paper by an “early career contributor” published in the past year (2021 for the 2022 conference). For this award, an early career contributor is defined as a scholar whose work is published within two years of receiving his or her Ph.D. (or a scholar who had not yet received the Ph.D. when the paper was published). Dr. Yoon was awarded a plaque and $2,500 at the 2022 Society of Consumer Psychology’s virtual conference on Friday, March 4.

 

Majid’s New Food Waste Course Highlighted in The Free Lance-Star

Associate Professor of Marketing Kashef Majid

Associate Professor of Marketing Kashef Majid

Associate Professor of Marketing Kashef Majid’s new course, Alleviating Food Waste, was featured on the front page of The Free Lance-Star newspaper on Nov. 6.

Majid developed the new course based on his own interest in and research on the subject of food waste, which is an environmental, social and economic challenge for the United States and the world.

“The course has a couple of goals,” he said. “I want students to be aware of how big a problem this is, and that this is a fixable problem.”

Between 30 and 40 percent of food that is produced gets wasted, Majid said—the equivalent of buying four grocery bags worth of food and just leaving one on the ground.

That waste is occurring alongside widespread food insecurity. According to Feeding America, the nonprofit that operates a network of 200 food banks across the country, an estimated 38 million Americans—including more than 12 million children—were food insecure last year.

“If we even reduced the amount of food wasted by 20 percent, we wouldn’t have food insecurity,” Majid said. Read more.

Marsh Shares Thoughts on MBA on Fuentitech.com

In a Fuentitech.com piece, Associate Professor of Business John Marsh was asked his opinion on how a Master of Business Administration degree continues to be a benefit to today’s jobseekers.

John Marsh, an associate professor of business at the University of Mary Washington, said some people choose to earn an MBA early in their careers. It’s easier to manage when you’re young. Some people find that the MBA puts them in a better position for career advancement.

“Others help to stand out from other applicants, so we pursue it,” continued Marsh. “Yes, in a sense, revenue potential is certainly a major consideration for most people looking to get an MBA.” Read more. 

Ken Machande: Counting on Change

Ken Machande had a case of jitters heading into Monroe Hall more than two decades ago. He had the credentials, but he was “beyond nervous,” he said of his first day as an adjunct professor at Mary Washington.

College of Business Interim Dean Ken Machande

College of Business Interim Dean Ken Machande

“I remember walking out of every class knowing more about accounting than when I walked in,” he said. “I was hooked.”

Early worries long gone, Machande’s still commanding the classroom, teaching Principles of Accounting three mornings a week. As UMW’s business offerings have expanded through the years, so has his job. As current interim dean – a position he held also in 2018-19 – he’s poised to help move the College of Business (COB) forward.

But before Mary Washington, there was the military.

Machande was a young Marine stationed in Japan in the ’80s when he started studying business. A 21-year stint in the service brought a wealth of experience, a CPA and a 1994 bachelor of liberal studies degree from Mary Washington. Five years later, favorite former professor Leigh Frackleton, then-chair of the business department, offered him that formidable job in Monroe.

“I had extensive accounting experience, but I also had an extreme case of self-doubt. Somewhere in the second or third semester I calmed down and realized I could actually teach accounting,” said Machande, who was named COB’s associate dean in 2012.

Since then, the College has received AACSB accreditation, earning a spot among the world’s best. It’s added undergraduate majors in marketing, international business and Machande’s favorite, accounting. Faculty work with business majors who minor in subjects across disciplines, graduate students and those at the Naval Surface Warfare Center at Dahlgren.

The focus, Machande said, remains on teaching … “which is a lot of fun.”

Q: What do you love about teaching?
A: All our faculty members at UMW love to teach. I’m no different. Connecting with students early in their academic careers is important for many reasons – for the students and for me.

Q: What’s your take on being named interim dean, not once but twice?
A: Both appointments occurred under special circumstances. The first time, someone was needed immediately to serve, and we’re in the middle of a pandemic this second time, so there were no broad-based searches for candidates in either case. Many of my colleagues possess the skills and abilities to do the job, but I had the advantage of knowing what needs to be done because I’d been the associate dean for several years.

Q: What’s most rewarding about your job?
A: Our faculty members are collaborative and brilliant. Our staff members always take the extra step to help. Our administration is compassionate. Our students are curious. We all contribute in our own way to make UMW a special place where learning always happens. I’m reminded every day how lucky I am to work at UMW.

Q: What’s most challenging?
A: Working through the uncertainty caused by the pandemic.

Q: What do you like to do in your free time?
A: Spend time with my family (wife Samantha and two daughters) and play – or better said, try to play – guitar.

Q: What would people be surprised to learn about you?
A: I’m the best kickball player in the College of Business.

Alum, Sports Exec, Scores Spot in Top ‘Forty Under 40’

Mike Shane ’04 is the chief business officer for Comcast Spectacor, which owns the Philadelphia Flyers hockey team and Wells Fargo Center. Shane, who also spent over a decade with the Washington Nationals, was just named to Sports Business Journal‘s ‘Forty Under 40’ list.

Mike Shane ’04 is the chief business officer for Comcast Spectacor, which owns the Philadelphia Flyers hockey team and Wells Fargo Center. Shane, who also spent over a decade with the Washington Nationals, was just named to Sports Business Journal‘s ‘Forty Under 40’ list.

Just like it was yesterday, Mike Shane ’04 remembers the Washington Nationals making the playoffs nearly a decade ago.

“An hour after the game ended, stands were still packed. Everyone was cheering as the players took a lap around the field, high-fiving their fans,” said Shane, who spent 13 years moving up through the organization. “From the players to the staff to the fans, that night was the culmination of so much effort, energy and passion.”

Shane, who played baseball and earned a bachelor’s degree while at Mary Washington, has seen his hard work pay off. This summer, he was named to Sports Business Journal’s (SBJ) “Forty Under 40” list. Now chief business officer for Comcast Spectacor, a sports and entertainment company that owns professional ice hockey team the Philadelphia Flyers, Shane said that from the beginning, his focus has been on helping sports fans make lasting memories.

“I love walking onto the concourse before a game and seeing kids’ faces light up as they take it all in,” said Shane, a father of three boys who brings his family to the UMW alumni baseball game every year. Read more.

Richardson Final Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

Outgoing College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s final column in The Free Lance-Star is entitled, “Repotting the Plant.”

I’m not a gardener, but I understand the concept of repotting plants.

At some point, the nutrients in the dirt become depleted. Replacing the old dirt with new soil full of nutrients helps the plant grow. Of course, your plant may be outgrowing its pot, so a bigger pot might reduce the constriction on the plant’s growth.

I am the plant in the pot, and it’s time to repot me! I need new nutrients and, while not necessarily a bigger pot, a different pot. After 10 wonderfully challenging years at the University of Mary Washington, I need new challenges to address. This will be my last column. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s most recent column in The Free Lance-Star is entitled, “Learning to Make Good Decisions by Making Bad Ones First.”

MANY years ago, a reporter asked Walmart founder Sam Walton, “How did you become so successful?” Walton answered, “I’ve made a lot of good decisions.”

The follow-up question by the reporter was then, “How did you learn to make good decisions?” Walton simply replied, “By making a lot of bad decisions.”

Can you relate to this? I certainly can. Read more.

 

Kinsley, Rycroft to Publish Book on Inequality in America

Inequality in AmericaOn June 30, College of Business Senior Lecturer Kimberley Kinsley and Professor of Economics Robert Rycroft will have a book published, Inequality in America: Causes and Consequences, Santa Barbara, CA:ABC-CLIO.  https://products.abc-clio.com/ABC-CLIOCorporate/product.aspx?pc=A5815C. It is an edited book consisting of 35 essays written by 50 authors, with substantial contributions from Kinsley and Rycroft. Kinsley wrote a chapter about civil justice. Rycroft, along with Lauren DiRago-Duncan ’15, now a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Kentucky, wrote a chapter on labor markets. Both Kinsley and Rycroft wrote the preface and a chapter on wealth inequality. In addition, Assistant Professor of Education Christy Irish, along with Allison Ward Parsons from George Mason University’s College of Education and Human Development, wrote a chapter on education reform policies. President Troy Paino wrote the introduction.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s latest column in The Free Lance-Star discusses letting go when a decision in your organization doesn’t go your way. Read “LET GO OF THE BONE.”

We’ve all been there, on one side of the situation or the other.

A decision was that you didn’t agree with. Maybe you thought it wasn’t best for the organization, but it’s more likely that it was not in your personal best interest.

Or perhaps you were the person who had to make the tough call. You gathered the available information to inform the decision and, after mulling the options, made the choice.

Now the announcement has been made. The people impacted are not thrilled. And the second- guessing and arguments begin. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s latest column in The Free Lance-Star is entitled, “Aids to ensure better productivity.”

I WEAR hearing aids. Most people are surprised to learn this. They are not only surprised I wear them—and have for more than 15 years—but that I share that I wear them. Evidently, I’m supposed to be embarrassed that I wear them. I’m not.

I also wear glasses or contact lenses. Obviously, people can see when I wear glasses, and I was called “four eyes” as a child. Today, no one seems to care. There’s no stigma attached to wearing glasses.

But it seems some people think I should feel shame that I wear hearing aids. I’m actually proud that I’m smart enough to know that hearing aids help me, both professionally and personally. Read more.