October 30, 2020

Yoon Co-Conducted Study on Online Support Groups

Assistant Professor of Marketing Kelly EunJung Yoon

Assistant Professor of Marketing Kelly EunJung Yoon

Assistant Professor of Marketing Kelly EunJung Yoon, of UMW’s College of Business, co-conducted a study, led by the University of California, Irvine, into how participants in online support groups tend to hide demographic information, in an effort to form better connections with other members.

“Our findings indicate a striking discrepancy between people’s perception of self-disclosure effects and the reality in online support groups. Members tended to refrain from revealing when they were demographically different from their interaction partner or had overall minority status, believing it would hinder them from fitting in or relating well to others. But when members naturally engaged in communicating those details, the result was strong relationships that produced health benefits,” said Connie Pechmann, UCI professor of marketing and lead author of the study. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s latest column in The Free Lance-Star is entitled, “CONSIDER THE SOURCE.”

Say you just got some disturbing feedback through the back channels of your organization. According to this feedback, your latest decision was a knee-jerk reaction that was ill-informed. Based on what you’ve been told, you don’t have a brain in your head. If you did, how in the world could you think your decision was the right one? You are totally clueless.

You’re not feeling too good right now, are you? You’re probably doubting not only this decision, but every one you’ve ever made in your life.

But wait! What is the source of this feedback?

Why would that matter? Because you should always consider the source of feedback before beating yourself up—or, conversely, thinking you’re fabulous. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s latest column in The Free Lance-Star is entitled, “DECIDE THAT YOU CAN.”

 

At the 1952 Helsinki Olympics, Great Britain’s Roger Bannister finished the 1,500 meters in fourth place. He determined then that he wanted to be the first person in history to run a mile in less than four minutes.

Why was that a big deal? Because it never had been done. In fact, people thought it was impossible.

But Roger set his goal, created a practice schedule (while training as a doctor), and in 1954 ran the mile in 3 minutes, 59.4 seconds. Bannister had achieved the unthinkable.

After Bannister broke the 4-minute mark, others broke it. Since 1954, more than 1,500 runners have broken the 4-minute mile; the record today is 3:43.13, held by Hicham El Guerrouj.

So many times, we decide that things cannot be done. It becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. If we don’t believe we can do something different, we want to be right, so we have a mindset that ensures something different is never done. Bannister was told he couldn’t run a mile in less than 4 minutes. He could have accepted it, but he didn’t.

His mindset was such that he determined he could, so he did. And we can do the same. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s latest column in The Free Lance-Star is titled, “CARE ENOUGH TO COACH.”

 

I once had a colleague who provided me with opportunities to be a coach. As a manager, he had a good heart and gave me every indication that he wanted to be a good manager. But there were many times he did things that ultimately gave me the opportunity to care enough about him to correct his behavior.

Did you catch that? I cared enough about him to have tough conversations with him. Eventually, he said that to me. He shared that he had told his wife about one of our recent conversations, and his wife remarked, “She must care a lot about you to keep sharing ways that you can get better.”

Have you either thought about corrective actions as caring? Most of us do not. Read more.

 

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s latest column in The Free Lance-Star is titled “The Best Way to Handle Salary Increases.”

During my first eight years in the workplace, I received an annual salary increase. While that was terrific, my raise percentage was the same as every other person in the business school. A new dean arrived and changed the model. In the following five years at that same business school, raises were given each year, but the percentages varied based on performance.

Some organizations today follow the ‘across-the-board’ increase model. For example, there are large firms that hire many college graduates every summer at the same salary (and the only variances across the country are due to cost of living considerations). So perhaps they hire everyone in the Atlanta office at a salary of $50,000. All new hires are trained and do, more or less, the same job. After a year, everyone gets the same pay increase. Performance has nothing to do with how the raises are determined. Some firms have used this model for years. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s latest column in The Free Lance-Star focuses on the “Transition to Retirement.”

Most of us think of retirement as something to look forward to when we’re in our 60s. That’s when the majority of workers will retire. But it’s not the only time. Increasingly, people are having to wait until their 70s to retire because they didn’t plan early enough for retirement to save the money necessary to live without a job. But others are retiring in their 20s or 30s. What?

I read an article recently about a professional athlete whose career was over in his early 30s. While most of us think only about the financial implications of retirement, there are many others. He had made enough money to live comfortably without working for the rest of his life. What he realized, however, is that whether you’re 35 or 65 when you retire, there are many things to think about. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses TREATING PEOPLE WITH RESPECT.

 

Once upon a time, there was an organization. This organization welcomed a new head person. This person had come from a similar organization where he had years of experience as the head guy.

Months into the new person’s tenure, a beloved manager was visited by the new boss—she was not doing things as he expected. Even though she was an expert, he wanted to tell her how to do her job. She pushed back a bit. At the next staff meeting, with all of the managers in attendance, he demeaned her in front of her peers.

Appropriately, she went to him privately after the meeting and expressed her distress at being berated in front of her colleagues. He was dismissive of her remarks. She soon resigned.

People in the company took sides. There were those who thought he was well within his rights to have both told her what to do and, when she wasn’t willing to roll over, talk about her to her colleagues. Others were appalled at his behavior. Certainly, they agreed, he could express his desires about how she did her job, but they could not believe he made derogatory remarks about her in front of her peers.

Many in the latter group went to the employee who resigned and asked her to reconsider. She would not. A schism formed within the organization.

What went wrong? Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses being bold about your organization’s plans for after the pandemic. Read IMAGINING THE FUTURE.

THE PANDEMIC has totally disrupted so many parts of our lives, not the least of which is the workplace. So I’ve been wondering how our organizations will look in a few years.

In conversations with people who work in a variety of industries, a common theme is astonishment that work requiring an office setting a year ago can effectively be done from home today. One person said to me, “If I hadn’t seen it, I wouldn’t have believed it.” We can relate.

While what we do may be similar, how and where we work is different. So where do we go from here?

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses holding employees to their commitments. Read ACCOUNTABILITY IS MY SUPERPOWER.

 

A colleague told me that accountability is my superpower. After reflecting a bit, I determined there was merit to her statement.

First, I hold myself accountable. When I say I’m going to do something, you can count on me to get it done. Whether it’s attending a meeting or completing a task, if I commit, I will do everything in my power to fulfill the commitment. In Gallup’s StrengthsFinder assessment, responsibility is one of my top five strengths. Gallup’s definition of responsibility equates to accountability.

But I don’t think that’s what my colleague was referring to. She noticed that I hold others accountable.

The first step in holding others responsible is communication. Before others can be held responsible for their actions, they must understand what is expected of them. If you work in my unit and have no clue what you need to do, how can we hold you accountable? Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses how to enforce regulations in a company when it comes to employees with differing abilities. Read APPLYING RULES.

 

I heard a story that broke my heart. A young man on the autism spectrum has a job in a well-known organization. He made a snack purchase on the honor system at his office break room. When he scanned the item, he hit the wrong button and ended up canceling the transaction instead of charging it. But he didn’t realize what he had done and ate the item.

Later, he was confronted about stealing the $5 item. It’s my understanding that he didn’t explain what happened well, and was placed on suspension for a week. He thought he was going to lose his job, including his important benefits.

I first became aware of the situation while he was on suspension. A relative of his had shared the story and was concerned about what might happen. While I certainly had no way of knowing why he was suspended for a week over such a transgression, I was confident that he would not lose his job over it. The relative indicated he had worked there for 2½ years, had never been late, had never called in sick and volunteered to work late. He had even won a productivity award in a previous month. Read more.