May 28, 2020

College of Business Congratulates Class of 2020

UMW’s College of Business created a YouTube video to congratulate the Class of 2020, and specifically COB graduates, on completing their degrees. Compiled by Assistant Professor of Management Alexandra Dunn, the video features COB Dean Lynne Richardson, President Troy Paino and faculty from across the college.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses setting routines and limits to your work schedule. Read SCHEDULES AND BOUNDARIES.

 

One of the biggest challenges of teleworking concerns schedules and boundaries. While some folks have adapted well to working from home, others would say they are failing.

Let’s start with college students. As I talked with faculty and students weekly during the last half of the spring semester, one of the recurring themes was the inability for many students to create a schedule for themselves.

It was especially difficult if the course had become asynchronous—it was not meeting at its regular time. Instead, faculty were posting videos of lectures and expecting students to watch the lectures and take quizzes or complete assignments to indicate they were “attending class,” albeit virtually. Some students, without the structure their face-to-face class schedule provided, were struggling to re-create their schedules at home. Read more.

UMW Professors Find Creative Ways to Teach Through COVID-19

Assistant Music Professor Christopher Ryder (top, center) teaches conducting over Zoom. “I’ve been impressed by the students’ ability to adapt to very difficult circumstances,” said Ryder, who is among the UMW faculty who are now finding new and creative ways to teach remotely.

Assistant Music Professor Christopher Ryder (top, center) teaches conducting over Zoom. “I’ve been impressed by the students’ ability to adapt to very difficult circumstances,” said Ryder, who is among the UMW faculty who are now finding new and creative ways to teach remotely.

Teaching at Mary Washington looks a bit different lately. Andi Smith films YouTube videos with her children to demonstrate architectural principles. Zach Whalen uses cartoons to teach a digital studies lesson. Smita Jain Oxford holds Zoom office hours for business majors on her daily jog.

When the University moved to virtual classes last month due to the coronavirus pandemic, UMW faculty had to adapt quickly. Some already had experience with online instruction, while others became students themselves, seeking advice from tech-savvy colleagues – as well as the Digital Learning Center, Center for Teaching and UMW Libraries. Armed with a variety of technology tools, they’ve been finding creative and engaging ways to educate, support and stay connected to students through the end of the semester and beyond.

Students are facing multiple challenges as they complete their coursework, said Janine Davis, an associate professor in UMW’s College of Education. Dealing with limited internet access, caring for sick family members and serving in essential jobs are among their chief concerns, she said, and they’re also managing a wide range of emotions.

“We have to give students some space,” Davis said, “but also let them know we’re here and we want them to succeed and be healthy.” Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses how we should reconsider our spending and saving habits in the wake of the pandemic. Read LIVING BELOW YOUR MEANS.

 

THE COVID-19 pandemic has devastated the financial lives of many Americans. Between jobs lost or hours dramatically cut back, many are facing financial ruin. The stock market was in free fall for a bit, but seems to have moderated a bit lately. While no one could have predicted the impact the virus would have on the economy, it has caused many of us to consider, or perhaps reconsider, our lifestyle.

Financial advisors recommend that we save enough money to be able to pay for our living expenses for three to six months. Our living expenses would include the “must haves” and not the “wants.” Your mortgage or rent, utilities, car payments, insurance premiums, food costs, and other items specific to your situation—such as baby formula or medicine—would have to be covered. Items such as new clothing, vacations, concert tickets, would not.

Another tip from financial advisors is to live below your means. Just because you can afford something doesn’t mean you should purchase it. A couple of examples come to mind. Read more.

Through Pandemic, Research Remains Top Priority at UMW

Held annually on campus, UMW’s Research and Creativity Day went virtual this year, due to COVID-19. The event allows students to share projects they’ve worked on all year.

Held annually on campus, UMW’s Research and Creativity Day went virtual this year, due to COVID-19. The event allows students to share projects they’ve worked on all year.

They put in the hours – late-night study sessions, one-on-one meetings with faculty members, conferences, presentations and projects. All year long, students have been working hard on one of the University of Mary Washington’s top priorities: undergraduate research.

A pandemic wasn’t about to stop the 14th annual showcase that highlights all of their efforts. Filled with posters in the form of PDF images and oral synopses on video, the UMW Research and Creativity Day Virtual Symposium covers everything from math and science to the performing and visual arts. The online event will be open tomorrow through Friday for questions and comments, and for all-around marveling over UMW students’ ingenuity and drive.

“It’s a time for all of us to pause to celebrate our students’ hard work, their creativity, and the knowledge they’ve produced,” said Assistant Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences Betsy Lewis. “When it was clear we wouldn’t be able to do this face-to-face on campus this year, I really wanted to find a way to replicate that sense of community and celebration.” Read more.

College of Business Holds Honors Night Via Zoom

The College of Business held its Honors Night on April 16, via Zoom.

The College of Business held its Honors Night on April 16, via Zoom.

The College of Business held a virtual Honors Night on Thursday, April 16. Students were inducted into the Beta Gamma Sigma honor society, and four were surprised with Outstanding Student Awards in each of COB majors/programs, and one was named the Rappahannock Rotary Ethical Student of the Year.

The recipients were:

Carley Vaughn, Patricia Lacey Metzger Memorial Award:  Accounting
Savannah Powers, Outstanding Student in Business Administration/International Business
Quintin Ricci, Outstanding Student in Marketing
Eric Boynton, Outstanding MBA Student
Dennis Ferry, Rappahannock Rotary Ethical Student of the Year

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star focuses on the value of treating each person in an organization with respect. Read SHOW RESPECT FOR ALL.

I love this story.

Walt Bettinger, CEO of San Francisco-based Charles Schwab, occasionally takes job candidates out for breakfast as part of the interview process. He arrives early and takes the manager aside, asking him to have the waiter mess up the candidate’s order. He assures the manager that he will leave the waiter a good tip, but he definitely wants the restaurant to get the order wrong!

Why, you might ask, does Mr. Bettinger do this? He wants to see how the candidate reacts to the situation. Is the candidate understanding or does he get angry or frustrated? The CEO believes it helps him determine how the candidate will deal with adversity if hired by Schwab—and we know there will be situations that don’t go the way we want in business.

This reminded me of other stories I’ve heard from people I know. We all know gatekeepers. These are the people, with various titles in an organization, who determine the flow of information among employees. Many times these are front line people with titles like receptionist or administrative assistant.

Let’s say I’m in sales and approach the receptionist at the front desk. I have an appointment with the purchasing agent and am here to check in. But I choose to be rude to the staff member, treating her with disdain and acting as if she’s not important. How long do you think I will have to wait before she lets the purchasing agent know I am waiting? Probably longer than I want. She’s got the power! Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s latest column deals with being flexible with working, teaching and learning remotely. Read PIVOT QUICKLY.

 

I love change.

But I know the world does not embrace change the way I do, so it’s been amazing to see how, when under the gun, people pivot within days to change how they deliver their work.

Unless you work in grocery or a hospital, or drive trucks, you are probably teleworking or have dramatically changed how you deliver your product.

Has it been fun? No. But it’s been necessary, and we’ve seen people step up and—dare I say—surprise themselves at how they’ve been able to pivot quickly. While the delivery of their product or service may not be the same quality or meet the same set of expectations as before COVID-19, it’s been pretty darn good. And that’s been fun to watch, even if it hasn’t been fun to execute.

Look at K–12 and higher education. Both are educating students online now. Yes, parents have picked up much of the K–12 responsibilities, but the teachers are helping them by creating expectations and sharing lesson plans. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s latest column deals with the ‘new normal’ of staying home. Read LIVING AND WORKING IN A NEW, VIRTUAL REALITY.

 

While watching television one night, I saw a commercial for home grocery delivery.

“Soon, we won’t have to leave our house for any reason,” I said to my husband.

We can get our entertainment at home, and professional development and education through our computers. While going to the gym is nice, some of us have home gyms or use videos or online exercise classes. I can download books through free services from my public library or have a subscription service provide me with everything I want to read. Our news is delivered online. I can use TeleMed for many medical needs.

Then there’s food delivery. In addition to the tried-and-true pizza delivery options, we now have companies like GrubHub and DoorDash. Retailers allow you to order online and have products delivered to your door. Need some clothing? It’s just a click away. You can stay home and enjoy your worship service online or on television, too. Some organizations have allowed employees to telework, at least occasionally, for years. And now you can get your groceries delivered? Why would I ever need to leave home?

Fast forward a couple of months, and we are living this reality. I certainly never expected to have to stay home, but we’re doing it. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses the importance of body language. Read NONVERBAL SIGNALS SPEAK VOLUMES.

 

Did you know research shows that your body language, or nonverbal messaging, speaks louder to people than the words you say?

Some believe 55 percent of communication is nonverbal. Within that remaining 45 percent, only 7 percent of communication is attributed to the words. The remaining 38 percent comes from tone, pitch, loudness and other attributes related to how the words are said.

Here’s an illustration I use in my professional selling class, one that everyone can relate to. Read more.