January 27, 2021

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s column in The Free Lance-Star is entitled, “WHY IS THE ANSWER ALWAYS NO?”

YOU APPROACH a colleague with a request to do something in a new way. Your colleague responds immediately: “No. That’s not possible.”

Of course, it may not be possible, but perhaps it is, and your colleague just doesn’t want to investigate how it might be done. They want to keep doing it “the way it’s always been done.”

I have worked in four public institutions, each in a different state. While there are some state rules, along with some protocols from the governing groups for each state, many of the rules are just ingrained practices that each institution created. Read more.

Majid Interviewed by Wallet Hub on Car Insurance Marketing

Associate Professor of Marketing Kashef Majid

Associate Professor of Marketing Kashef Majid

Associate Professor of Marketing Kashef Majid was recently interviewed for a feature on WalletHub.com on car insurance. Majid provided insight into the ways COVID-19 has impacted car insurance companies and how these companies target consumers through celebrity endorsements.

How do you think COVID-19 has affected consumer demand for car insurance?

At a large scale, COVID-19 has harmed the economy which would trickle into demand for cars and subsequently insurance. On a more micro-level what this has done is made people more cognizant about how much they are paying for car insurance so I would expect more consumers to reevaluate how much they are paying for car insurance. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s column in The Free Lance-Star asks managers to consider their organization’s application process. Read APPLY TO YOUR ORGANIZATION.

MANY MANAGERS complain they cannot recruit good people. Perhaps the good people don’t want to work for your organization and don’t apply, and it might not be for the reason you think.

Have you considered lately how hard it is to apply for a position in your workplace? I’m talking about the application process.

The majority of organizations today ask candidates to apply via a website. The applicant is required to upload their résumé, which is a reasonable request. But then they’re asked to essentially replicate the résumé in boxes, including information such as why they left the employer and their ending salary. If you’re a person of a certain age who has held at least 3–5 jobs, it can take several hours to populate the document with information that is most likely on your résumé. Why?

Several years ago, I was on a conference call with human resources directors from a variety of organizations and we discussed this very issue. Read more.

Also read Richardson’s other recent columns, WE LEARN FROM FAILURE, NEVER LET ‘EVERYONE’ DRIVE YOUR DECISION and THE POWER OF ENCOURAGEMENT.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s latest column in The Free Lance-Star discusses the importance of preparing employees to back each other up in their roles and responsibilities. Read WHEN REDUNDANCIES ARE GOOD.

I had been in my first dean position about two months. There were three staff members in my office supporting the administrative team. One of the members, Joyce, was on vacation for the week when I asked one of the others, Laura, if she would take care of something for me the next day. She immediately said, “That’s Joyce’s job,” and pulled out a two-page document of responsibilities in the office.

It was a “who does what” list. She showed me that Joyce’s name was beside the item I had asked her to do. I was a bit astonished. While I appreciated that they had figured out all of the tasks, I was a bit concerned that work would not get done when the responsible person was out. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s column in The Free Lance-Star explores leadership. Read LEADING FROM THE TOP, MIDDLE AND BACK.

 

IN 2000, I attended a conference in Scottsdale, Ariz. One of the highlights of the conference—and of any conference I have ever attended—was the opportunity to climb a mountain. We climbed Camelback Mountain.

Before climbing the mountain, however, we had a presentation from an experienced mountain climber and speaker who was involved in leading excursions to Mount Everest with Executive Master of Business Administration students at a high-profile institution. While they didn’t scale the summit, they did challenge the mountain.

Our speaker used mountain climbing as a metaphor for leadership and teamwork. He inspired us to see the commonalities. Read more.

Marketing Class Partners with Students Across the Globe

UMW students aren’t able to study abroad due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. But this fall, an international marketing class is engaging in cross-cultural learning by partnering with students at a university in the Czech Republic to better understand global consumerism.

UMW students aren’t able to study abroad due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. But this fall, an international marketing class is engaging in cross-cultural learning by partnering with students at a university in the Czech Republic to better understand global consumerism.

Studying abroad is as much a part of University of Mary Washington culture as bench-sitting or playing Frisbee on Ball Circle. One-third of each graduating class – about 300 students – spends time learning overseas.

Not this year.

As COVID-19 continues to sweep the globe, international travel – like commencements, reunions and all large gatherings – has been put on hold.

But the pandemic hasn’t halted cross-cultural learning at Mary Washington. This fall, an international marketing class taught by College of Business Associate Professor Kashef Majid has partnered with a university in the Czech Republic to better understand global consumerism and how certain brands and behaviors can transcend cultural differences. Connecting on Zoom, students have discussed everything from fashion fads to technology trends, discovering similarities and differences between young adults living on opposite sides of the world.

“You can study marketing trends in foreign countries all day long,” said senior Ginny Summers, “but in order to succeed in business, you need to be able to have a respectful conversation with someone from a different culture.” Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s column in The Free Lance-Star explores ways women and men are treated differently during the interview process. Read RETHINKING RECOMMENDATION QUESTIONS.

DURING the last decade or so, we have been made aware of the disparities between men and women in senior roles in organizations. We have also read many articles and shared anecdotes about how men and women manage and lead differently. And who can forget “Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus” to explain differences between the genders?

The status quo has been challenged over and over. But we still have work to do.

For example, a female friend in a senior role at another university shared a story with me. Susan served as a reference for another woman. That woman, let’s call her Dana, was a finalist for a senior position at another university. Susan received the reference call from a man named Dave. During the call, Dave asked many of the standard reference check questions and Susan ably responded. And then Dave asked, “Do you think Dana comes across as very likeable?” Susan replied, “Well, what exactly do you mean? Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson discusses when it’s time to consider getting a new job in “RUN TO A JOB, NOT AWAY FROM ONE.”

A recent conversation struck a chord with me. A young person I know is not happy, but also not unhappy, with her job, so we discussed whether she should leave. There are so many variables to consider.

My advice is to never quit a job until you have a new job, with one caveat: If you feel unsafe in your work, you should quit immediately. Read more.

Yoon Co-Conducted Study on Online Support Groups

Assistant Professor of Marketing Kelly EunJung Yoon

Assistant Professor of Marketing Kelly EunJung Yoon

Assistant Professor of Marketing Kelly EunJung Yoon, of UMW’s College of Business, co-conducted a study, led by the University of California, Irvine, into how participants in online support groups tend to hide demographic information, in an effort to form better connections with other members.

“Our findings indicate a striking discrepancy between people’s perception of self-disclosure effects and the reality in online support groups. Members tended to refrain from revealing when they were demographically different from their interaction partner or had overall minority status, believing it would hinder them from fitting in or relating well to others. But when members naturally engaged in communicating those details, the result was strong relationships that produced health benefits,” said Connie Pechmann, UCI professor of marketing and lead author of the study. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s latest column in The Free Lance-Star is entitled, “CONSIDER THE SOURCE.”

Say you just got some disturbing feedback through the back channels of your organization. According to this feedback, your latest decision was a knee-jerk reaction that was ill-informed. Based on what you’ve been told, you don’t have a brain in your head. If you did, how in the world could you think your decision was the right one? You are totally clueless.

You’re not feeling too good right now, are you? You’re probably doubting not only this decision, but every one you’ve ever made in your life.

But wait! What is the source of this feedback?

Why would that matter? Because you should always consider the source of feedback before beating yourself up—or, conversely, thinking you’re fabulous. Read more.