September 25, 2020

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses why you should LISTEN TO YOUR GUT.

 

WE ALL have gut feelings. But how often do we follow them?

I’m amazed at how people do something that will probably not be in their best interest and later say they knew it was a mistake. It’s an epidemic of not listening to our instincts.

It could be a high-profile decision that will probably not play well in the court of public opinion. I’m thinking specifically of the Houston Astros and their sign-stealing scheme. Stealing signs in baseball is nothing new, but using technology is totally out of bounds. So the owner of the team fired both the coach and the general manager immediately, and two other Major League managers, both previously affiliated with the Astros, lost their jobs as well. Read more.

College of Business Presents Money Matters, Tuesdays in March

Adulting is HARD, and one of the hardest parts is learning money management. That’s why the College of Business is introducing a new program called Money Matters to teach students (and faculty and staff!) some of the basics! Topics include budgeting, saving, loans, insurance, taxes, and more. These sessions are free to attend and led by UMW faculty and alumni.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses how SHOWING APPRECIATION MATTERS.

ADAM GRANT, author of the bestselling book “Give and Take,” says, “A sense of appreciation is the single most sustainable motivator at work.”

The key word in that sentence is “sustainable.”

In psychology, we talk about extrinsic and intrinsic motivators. Extrinsic motivators include things like salary, benefits, titles, and appreciation. Intrinsic motivators are internal to the person and include work ethic and pride. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses ETHICS IN THE WORKPLACE.

I recently had one of the most energizing and challenging experiences I have had in my 30-plus years in higher education. Two of my colleagues and I taught—or perhaps the more appropriate word is facilitated—a business ethics course.

Our backgrounds were similar, yet very different. One of my colleagues is a philosophy professor and the other is an accountant. My expertise is marketing. So we brought quite a variety of experiences and perspectives to the classroom.

The philosophy professor shared the ethical theories of utilitarianism, deontology, and virtue ethics with us, giving us an excellent foundation from which to talk about business ethics. Her challenge to the students was to figure out for themselves what they valued by the end of the class. I’m not sure most of them understand what she meant by that at first, but they figured it out as the course unfolded. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

Most of the people we know have amazing networks.

Your own network consists of relatives, friends from childhood, friends from school, and work colleagues. Then there are those from your faith-based organization, your volunteer work, and your interest groups. You know a lot of people. We all do.

But have you ever thought of this group from a strategic standpoint? And I don’t mean strategic only from your perspective. You can be a strategic connection for others, too. Members of your network can help you connect to a job. But you too can be a connector for people. Read more.

UMW-Dahlgren Partnership Addresses Critical Needs

And a handshake makes it official. President Troy Paino and Capt. Casey Plew finalize the partnership after signing documents of agreement. To the left is UMW Provost Nina Mikhalevsky, and NSWCDD Acting Technical Director Darren Barnes is on the right. Photo by Robert A. Martin.

And a handshake makes it official. President Troy Paino and Capt. Casey Plew finalize the partnership after signing documents of agreement. To the left is UMW Provost Nina Mikhalevsky, and NSWCDD Acting Technical Director Darren Barnes is on the right. Photo by Robert A. Martin.

Individuals who work at the Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD) contribute toward a lofty goal: develop technology that improves the U.S. military’s ability to fight, win and bring troops home safely.

The institution of higher education located in closest proximity to Dahlgren – University of Mary Washington (UMW) – wants to contribute toward NSWCDD’s goal.

The first step has been taken.

NSWCDD employees – 40 percent of whom have advanced degrees – now have a chance to improve their skills and, possibly, achieve yet another degree. All they have to do is leave the office and drive across Highway 301 to Mary Washington’s Dahlgren Campus.

UMW’s College of Business, in collaboration with Continuing and Professional Studies, has enrolled its first cohort of Dahlgren leaders in a project management certificate program. Those admitted for the program are qualified, if interested, to pursue a master’s in business administration after December 2021 when they earn their certificates. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses EQUAL PAY FOR EQUAL WORK.

I had a conversation with a young person who began her first job less than a year ago. The topic was pay in the workplace.

There are four young women at her workplace. One makes a salary about 60 percent more than the others and is, according to the person I spoke to, doing essentially the same job. How does my young friend know this? Because of the structure and work done in the organization, they can know the salaries. So while the salaries are not public, they are internally known. These female employees are all white and under 30.

So we know there is generally a pay differential between men and women. We also know there is a differential between ethnicities, even within genders. While we would probably agree that is unacceptable, the facts are well documented. But why would an organization pay people such dramatically different salaries to do the same work? Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses TAKING THE HEAT FOR DOING THE RIGHT THING.

A FEW YEARS into my first job as a dean, I had to make a personnel decision that I knew was not going to be well received by the general public. It was not a hard decision to make, as the person had done some pretty bad stuff. Suffice it to say, the university attorney and president agreed that the action had to be taken. We were not firing the individual, but were removing supervisory authority.

I expected, however, that once the word got out, I would be vilified in the community. How dare I take this action? Why would I do such a thing to this person? The individual was such a resource. And on and on. Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses how to manage employees that refuse to follow the rules. Read THE RULES DON’T APPLY TO ME.

Every organization has rules. Maybe in your organization they are called protocols or processes or workflows. But they exist.

And they exist, most of the time, for a good reason. In hospitals and manufacturing organizations, safety is a common driver for why things are done certain ways. Ensuring that a person receives the right prescribed medication is important. And if an employee is working on a factory floor surrounded by equipment that could hurt someone if used improperly, teaching how to effectively use the equipment and having expectations about performance are critical.  Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

UMW College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses the advantages of having fewer employees. Read A SMALL TEAM CAN BE ENOUGH.

 

A FRIEND’S volleyball team recently won a national championship. As I watched the elite eight, the commentator kept reminding us that the team had only 10 players. That is a fairly small team in volleyball circles, where most teams have at least 15 players.

Despite having only 10 players, his team ultimately won the national championship and had a perfect record for the year in doing so. So it got me thinking.

The size of the team doesn’t really matter—in sports or in the workplace—if you have the right people. Read more.