February 19, 2020

Gentry To Host Session at George Washington Regional Commission Event

Lance Gentry, Professor, College of Business

Lance Gentry, Professor, College of Business

Lance Gentry, a professor in the College of Business, will present a session with Rappahannock United Way President Janel Donohue, ”Understanding the Region: Who are we and what are our opportunities?” on Oct. 17 at UMW’s Stafford Campus. The session will be one of three free sessions presented by the George Washington Regional Commission as part of its new program, Good Jobs Here.

According to an article in The Free Lance-Star, Gentry and Donohue will “discuss some of the key demographics and opportunities related specifically to Planning District 16. This will include a look at new data on the region’s workforce, including those who commute, and some unique opportunities that the region has to develop and grow economically.”

“The session will also take a special look at the portions of the region’s population that are working but struggling, so they can be included in the program’s long-term plans for success.”

Read the entire article here. 

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses why a job might be the best fit, or not, for your personal life. Read WORK AND PERSONAL LIVES.

 

How often do you consider the personal side of your life when you consider job opportunities?

I have lived and worked in a variety of locales: a mid-sized city, two smaller cities, and one fairly rural college town. As a person who blooms where she’s planted, I have no issues assimilating into any of the communities. But that’s not true for everyone. Read more. 

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses the importance of being willing to change and improve in the workplace. Read IS YOUR ORGANIZATION RECEPTIVE TO CHANGE? ARE YOU?

CHANGE is inevitable. We know it, but we don’t have to like it.

I had a conversation with a person who has been in his position for less than a year. His manufacturing organization was not up to date on best practices in the industry. As we discussed the many changes that he and his supervisor had brought to the organization, I asked what I thought of as the key question: “How receptive were the employees to these new ideas?”

Read more. 

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses when it’s acceptable to move an employee to another division:

 

SUPPOSE a manager comes up to you and says “I know Lynne is bad at her job, but she’s a lovely person, so I’m transferring her to your team.”

How would you react?

I happen to know that this exact thing once occurred at a business that will remain nameless.

Read more. 

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson’s weekly column in The Free Lance-Star discusses change and taking risks. Read BEING UNCOMFORTABLE:

YOU’VE probably heard “do one thing every day that scares you” at some point in your life. I think about this phrase a lot. It’s really hard to do something that creates discomfort every single day, but you can certainly occasionally get out of your comfort zone.

Like many, I’m not a huge fan of heights. As a kid, we would visit Vulcan, a statue in Birmingham, Ala., near my hometown. After climbing what seemed like thousands of steps, you ended up on a circular landing where you could walk around the statue. There was only a 3-foot-high fence around the landing. I would press my back against Vulcan and inch my way around the statue. I did not want to get close to the edge and look down.

Read more. 

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

Read the latest column in The Free Lance-Star written by Lynne Richardson, Dean of the College of Business, titled The new manager. 

 

I HAD a conversation with a former student. We’ll call her Anne. Anne is in her mid-20s and was promoted about a year ago into her first managerial position.

Anne manages one person, a woman in her mid-40s. Let’s call her Susan. Oh, and Susan is best friends with Anne’s boss, Laura. Can you see that Anne might have a bit of a problem?

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

Read the latest column in The Free Lance-Star written by Lynne Richardson, Dean of the College of Business, titled Lose the Bureaucratese, Please!

 

I RECEIVED an email recently from a government agency. I didn’t think the email was mine, as this office doesn’t normally send me emails, but I began reading it to make sure.

The first paragraph was written in such bureaucratic jargon that I could not figure out what it meant. After re-reading it a second time, I still didn’t really understand what it was saying, but figured out to whom it should have been sent, and promptly forwarded it to the correct person.

This experience got me thinking about how many times we create documents that are difficult for the average person to read. Whether the document is an instruction manual or legal purchase agreement, writing so an eighth grader can understand the message is important.

Read more. 

New UMW MBA Program to Launch this Fall

The UMW MBA program will begin a new format starting in Fall 2019. Recently, SCHEV approved the implementation of the 36 credit MBA program. The design of the MBA includes foundation business courses at the graduate level and eliminates the previous undergraduate business prerequisite course requirements.  MBA applicants who have five or more years of progressive, professional work experience or possess a regionally accredited, advanced degree may apply to have their GMAT or GRE waived.  For information on the new MBA program please contact the Office of Graduate Admission at ext. 8000 or email graduate@umw.edu. Click here for full program information.

 

 

Richardson’s Column Stresses Importance of Coming to Work

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

In her weekly column in The Free Lance-Star, College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson addresses the prevalence of teleworking, working from home and showing up late, and the message it sends to others.

 

I’VE had several conversations recently about people not coming to work.

In one situation, the manager doesn’t arrive at work until much later in the day than his employees. The employees—and everyone else—notice. Except maybe the manager’s supervisor. Is he unaware?

In another situation, a new employee was hired into a smaller organization. Most of the people she works with, including managers and peers, ‘work from home’ most days. So she’s sitting in essentially an empty office a lot of the time.

Read more.

Richardson Column in The Free Lance-Star

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

College of Business Dean Lynne Richardson

Read the latest column in The Free Lance-Star written by Lynne Richardson, Dean of the College of Business, titled What do you want from your signage?

 

Today’s challenge is to look inside and outside your organization at your signage. I’m guessing many of you would give yourself a low score, if you’re looking at your place of business as your customers do.

About a decade ago, I arrived at a new university as dean of the business school. While I wasn’t a customer per se, I sure did have a hard time finding different rooms in the business school building. Why? There had been a renovation and addition to the building immediately prior to my arrival. While each of the conference and team rooms, faculty and staff offices, and classrooms had been numbered, they had not put up a directory anywhere in the building. And there were no directional signs.

Read more.