October 1, 2022

Gupta Compares Post-Partition Economic Performance of India and Pakistan

Associate Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta

On the occasion of the 75th anniversary of the birth of India and Pakistan, The Conversation invited Surupa Gupta, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, to write a column comparing the legacy of British colonialism and the economic performance of India and Pakistan in the post-1947 period. While Pakistan’s growth rates outstripped India’s till the 1980s, Gupta argues that the script was flipped after 1991 when India undertook liberal reforms. India’s democratic system put pressure on its politicians to deliver higher growth. Even though Pakistan adopted some of the same economic policies, frequent changes in its government and its political system, coupled with its military spending, contributed to a lower growth rate and frequent economic crises.

Read the article, titled “India’s economy has outpaced Pakistan’s handily since Partition in 1947 – politics explains why,'” in the Times Union, The Herald PressPeru Tribune, Chronicle Tribune, The Times, Asia Times, Yahoo News, SheThePeople and more.

India’s economy has outpaced Pakistan’s handily since Partition in 1947 – politics explains why (Times Union; The Herald Press; Peru Tribune; Chronicle Tribune; The Times)

Gupta Shares Expertise on India With East-West Center

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta contributed to an article titled “India and the Indo-Pacific Economic Framework” for the East-West Center. “Even though India has emerged as an active and engaged member of the Quad, its decision to join IPEF — a US-led framework for economic cooperation in the Indo Pacific — was not a foregone conclusion.” Read more.

India and the Indo-Pacific Economic Framework (East West Center)

Gupta Delivers Guest Lecture at the Foreign Services Institute

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta

Surupa Gupta, professor of Political Science and International Affairs, delivered a guest lecture on Tuesday, April 26, at the Foreign Service Institute. The lecture, titled “Covid-19 in South Asia: State Responses to the Pandemic,” was delivered online to a group of US diplomats headed to Bangladesh, India and Pakistan.

Commentary: Indira Gandhi: Creator of the modern Indian state (The Free Lance-Star)

Gupta Pens Editorial on Indira Gandhi for Great Lives Lecture

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta penned an editorial for The Free Lance-Star entitled, “Indira Gandhi: Creator of the modern Indian State” in advance of her Great Lives lecture on India’s first and only woman prime minister, which was held on Tuesday, Feb. 22. The program can be accessed through the program website at umw.edu/greatlives.

INDIRA GANDHI is known as India’s first and only woman prime minister, and the world’s second democratically elected female head of government. These titles, however, mask a complex and fascinating personality. Gandhi, as prime minister, emerged as one of the most consequential and polarizing figures in Indian politics.

Derided initially as a “dumb doll,” Gandhi surprised her followers and detractors as a canny politician with a strong sense of realpolitik and an authoritarian bent. Her decisions helped both restore and tarnish India’s image in world politics.

She turned India from a food-scarce to a food-surplus country; her bold move to help establish Bangladesh strengthened India’s credentials as a major Asian power; and yet, her declaration of political emergency in 1975 delivered the first frontal attack to India’s democratic institutions since that nation gained independence from British colonial rule in 1947. Read more.

Gupta Discusses Global Minimum Corporate Tax

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta appeared on CGTN America, on “The Heat: Global leaders agree 15% minimum corporate tax.”

It’s called a global minimum corporate tax – designed to crack down on tax havens and impose new levies on large, profitable multinational corporations.

Details remain to be worked out, but according to the OECD, if enacted the plan could bring in about $150 billion in additional global tax revenue per year — and reshape the global economy. CGTN’s Toby Muse has a report.

To discuss: 

  • John Gong is an economics professor at the University of International Business and Economics in Beijing.
  • Joel Rubin is a democratic strategist and national security analyst. He served as a Deputy U.S. Assistant Secretary of State in the Obama administration.
  • Surupa Gupta is a University of Mary Washington political science and international affairs professor.
  • Arthur Dong is an economics and business professor at Georgetown University. Listen here.

Gupta Pens Article on Protests by India’s Farmers

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta penned an article for Inkstick Media entitled, “How India’s Farmers are Trying to make Modi Listen.”

For almost seven months now, Indian farmers have been protesting three laws that the Indian parliament passed in September 2020. They have blocked highways, organized a nationwide strike, and have continued with the protests through the current, deadly COVID-19 crisis.

Farmers’ protests are not uncommon in India. In 2018, over 40,000 farmers marched over a hundred miles to Mumbai in Maharashtra to demand better support for farmers from the state government. The current protests, however, have been remarkable for many reasons: The protests have occasionally become violent and have attracted widespread international attention from lawmakers and celebrities alike. After an initial offer to negotiate, the federal government, against whose laws the farmers are protesting, reacted by arresting a young climate activist and with a crackdown against protestors. Read more.

Gupta Discusses India’s Farmers’ Protests on Chicago Council on World Affairs Podcast

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta

Surupa Gupta, professor of Political Science and International Affairs, discussed India’s farmers’ protests on the Deep Dish podcast hosted by Brian Hanson at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. India’s farmers have been protesting three laws that the Indian Parliament passed in September 2020: the laws open up farm produce marketing to various private sector actors, limiting the role and the reach of government regulations.

Gupta also published a piece on the strength of farmers as a political force in India in The Conversation, a non-profit, independent, open-access news source.