August 4, 2021

Gupta Discusses Global Minimum Corporate Tax

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta appeared on CGTN America, on “The Heat: Global leaders agree 15% minimum corporate tax.”

It’s called a global minimum corporate tax – designed to crack down on tax havens and impose new levies on large, profitable multinational corporations.

Details remain to be worked out, but according to the OECD, if enacted the plan could bring in about $150 billion in additional global tax revenue per year — and reshape the global economy. CGTN’s Toby Muse has a report.

To discuss: 

  • John Gong is an economics professor at the University of International Business and Economics in Beijing.
  • Joel Rubin is a democratic strategist and national security analyst. He served as a Deputy U.S. Assistant Secretary of State in the Obama administration.
  • Surupa Gupta is a University of Mary Washington political science and international affairs professor.
  • Arthur Dong is an economics and business professor at Georgetown University. Listen here.

Gupta Pens Article on Protests by India’s Farmers

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta penned an article for Inkstick Media entitled, “How India’s Farmers are Trying to make Modi Listen.”

For almost seven months now, Indian farmers have been protesting three laws that the Indian parliament passed in September 2020. They have blocked highways, organized a nationwide strike, and have continued with the protests through the current, deadly COVID-19 crisis.

Farmers’ protests are not uncommon in India. In 2018, over 40,000 farmers marched over a hundred miles to Mumbai in Maharashtra to demand better support for farmers from the state government. The current protests, however, have been remarkable for many reasons: The protests have occasionally become violent and have attracted widespread international attention from lawmakers and celebrities alike. After an initial offer to negotiate, the federal government, against whose laws the farmers are protesting, reacted by arresting a young climate activist and with a crackdown against protestors. Read more.

Gupta Discusses India’s Farmers’ Protests on Chicago Council on World Affairs Podcast

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Surupa Gupta

Surupa Gupta, professor of Political Science and International Affairs, discussed India’s farmers’ protests on the Deep Dish podcast hosted by Brian Hanson at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. India’s farmers have been protesting three laws that the Indian Parliament passed in September 2020: the laws open up farm produce marketing to various private sector actors, limiting the role and the reach of government regulations.

Gupta also published a piece on the strength of farmers as a political force in India in The Conversation, a non-profit, independent, open-access news source.

Indian farmers are a powerful force in Indian politics, and here’s why their protests matter (New Canaan Advertiser; Australian Times)

Vietnam plays marked role in defining regional peace, cooperation: Analyst (Vietnam Plus)

How a Joe Biden Presidency Could Change U.S.-India Relations (Time)

Gupta Speaks on the She-cession to Students in New Delhi

Surupa Gupta, professor of Political Science and International Affairs and director of UMW's Women's and Gender Studies program

Surupa Gupta, professor of Political Science and International Affairs and director of UMW’s Women’s and Gender Studies program

Some of the same technology for online webinars was available even before the pandemic started but for the most part, few people were organizing webinars with global participation before March 2020. That has changed: students from Miranda House and Gargi College, two highly selective liberal arts colleges in New Delhi reached out to Surupa Gupta, director of UMW’s Women’s and Gender Studies Program and professor of Political Science and International Affairs with a request to speak in a webinar titled “Peace and Persistence – Assessing the ‘She-cession’ and Leadership of Women in Pandemic.” Gupta shared the panel, held on September 8, with two professors from New Delhi. The students belong to a campus group called Global Youth, which, among other things, seeks to expose Indian youth to diverse global perspectives on a variety of issues.

Study Abroad Carves Career Path for Alumna

Emily Rothstein ’18 chose the University of Mary Washington for its study abroad opportunities. When she wasn’t trotting across Campus Walk – sometimes on horseback as a UMW equestrian – she was trekking across countries and continents. The voyages this globetrotter made as a student have led her to an international nonprofit job and now […]

Dynamic Decade: Women’s and Gender Studies Program Turns 10

Six years after graduating from the University of Mary Washington, Sam Carter ’14 still draws daily on some of the lessons she learned as an undergrad. “Everyone has a different cultural experience,” said Carter, a Women’s and Gender Studies major who’s now a digital director for the House Budget Committee majority staff. “It’s important that […]

Dynamic Decade: Women’s and Gender Studies Program Turns 10

UMW students listen as Women’s and Gender Studies faculty and alums gather together to celebrate the program’s 10th anniversary. Photo by Karen Pearlman.

UMW students listen as Women’s and Gender Studies faculty and alums gather together to celebrate the program’s 10th anniversary. Photo by Karen Pearlman.

Six years after graduating from the University of Mary Washington, Sam Carter ’14 still draws daily on some of the lessons she learned as an undergrad.

“Everyone has a different cultural experience,” said Carter, a Women’s and Gender Studies major who’s now a digital director for the House Budget Committee majority staff. “It’s important that we understand that.”

Carter was back on campus yesterday to celebrate the program’s 10th anniversary. Through this interdisciplinary major, students explore the intersections of gender, race, class, ethnicity and sexual orientation to gain an understanding of the breadth of human experience. Graduates use the perspectives they acquire in the classroom to inform careers in such fields as media, law, health, education and social work, and to influence and inspire future generations. Read more.