August 20, 2022

Cooperman Quoted in Virginian-Pilot on Virginia Beach Delegate Race

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman

Rosalyn Cooperman, associate professor of political science, was quoted in an article in The Virginian-Pilot about an incumbent Republican delegate in Virginia Beach who, according to the article, says his “Democratic opponent’s attack mailers have actually benefited his campaign — so much so that he’s reporting them as a $44,000 in-kind contribution in official records submitted to the state.”

“In reality, the stunt is a creative way to frame what’s shaping up to be a close race as Democrats try to flip enough seats to seize control of the General Assembly,” Cooperman said. “It’s political theater, to be sure.” Read more. 

Cooperman Discusses the Decline of GOP Women in State Legislatures

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman

Associate Professor of Political Science Rosalyn Cooperman was interviewed for an article in Governing examining the decline of Republican women in state legislatures after the 2018 midterms. Cooperman said that both Republicans and Democrats have historically struggled on gender representation, but while liberal groups have made an effort to support female Democratic candidates, there are few organizations that are committed to recruiting and supporting GOP women running for office. The article also mentions Cooperman’s research on party donor contributions that she did with Melody Crowder-Meyer, a professor at Davidson College. According to the article, “their research found that 72 percent of Republican donors ‘never heard of’ five conservative women PACs, but only 7 percent of Democrats said the same about liberal women PACs. And while 2 percent of Republican donors said they actively support the group of conservative women PACs, 36 percent of Democratic donors support liberal women PACs.” Read more.

Getting Women Elected is Just the First Step (Gender Watch 2018)