May 24, 2022

Class of 2022: Stellar Student Stories, Part 2 of 3

The Class of 2022 began freshman year like any other, swept up in longstanding University of Mary Washington traditions like Move-In Day, Eagle Gathering and Honor Convocation. That all changed when they were sophomores. Classes went online, study abroad trips were postponed and everything – activities, internships and volunteer experiences – became virtual. But these […]

UMW Dedicates Mural Honoring First African-American Alumna

Dr. Venus Romance Jones. It’s no wonder University of Mary Washington senior Timbila Kabre said she had “fallen in love” while researching the late physician bearing that name, who in 1968, became the first African-American woman to graduate from Mary Washington. “Dr. Jones’ hard work, passion and love for others … is absolutely inspiring,” she […]

Lewis Quoted in Free Lance-Star Editorial on Vaccines

Professor and Chair of Biological Sciences Lynn Lewis

Professor and Chair of Biological Sciences Lynn Lewis

Professor and Chair of the Department of Biological Sciences Lynn Lewis weighed in on an editorial in The Free Lance-Star entitled “Science, personal choice must work together.”

Lynn Lewis, Ph.D., has a better feel than most for using science in making policy. She’s professor and chair of biological sciences at the University of Mary Washington, and she’s involved with advising school leaders on the policies UMW should follow on the pandemic.

“Science is not static,” she says. “There are always questions, and things are never known beyond a shadow of a doubt.”

So when guidelines switch from vaccinated people don’t need a mask to you must mask regardless of vaccination status, it’s because the information we have has shifted. “It’s not that you’re getting conflicting information,” she says, “it’s that things on the ground have changed.” Read more.

China-bound Graduate Focused on Global Goals

Bailey Johnson ’21 has a gift for being where she needs to be to meet her goals. Starting in August 2022, that will be Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. There she’ll join the newest class of Schwarzman Scholars, pursuing a master’s degree in global affairs. Johnson is among 151 scholars in nearly three dozen countries, […]

Antwi Interviewed on Spotted Lanternfly on NorthJersey.com

Assistant Professor of Biological Science Josephine Antwi

Assistant Professor of Biological Science Josephine Antwi

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences Josephine Antwi was interviewed on NorthJersey.com/The Record about the invasive spotted lanternfly.

“The key right now, is to keep them from spreading and to keep their numbers down in areas where they currently occur,” said Josephine Antwi, an entomologist at the University of Mary Washington in Virginia. “By destroying egg masses in the winter, we keep the number of the following generation down.” Read more.

Antwi Interviewed by Washington Post on Spotted Lanternfly

Assistant Professor of Biological Science Josephine Antwi

Assistant Professor of Biological Science Josephine Antwi

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences Josephine Antwi was interviewed by The Washington Post’s Capital Weather Gang about the invasive Spotted Lanternfly, which has been spotted across the East Coast and has the potential to wreak havoc upon trees, plants and agricultural crops like apples, grapes, stone fruits and hop plants.

Despite having wings, the adults don’t fly far. The bugs are often spread by vehicles. Residents in quarantined counties are urged to inspect vehicles and goods for transport to ensure that the insects and their egg masses are not hitching a ride.

“If females lay eggs on a substrate that eventually moves (e.g., automobiles or goods), then they quickly spread that way,” Josephine Antwi, a professor of biology at the University of Mary Washington in Fredericksburg, wrote in an email. Read more.

Science Symposium Showcases Research That’s Making a Difference

University of Mary Washington junior Karissa Highlander has spent the summer researching an infectious illness. But not the one scientists have been focused on for the past 18 months. Instead, Highlander, a biomedical sciences major, has been working on new treatments for tuberculosis. Though rare in the United States, antibiotic resistant strains of the deadly […]

Urban Forester Finds Love of Nature at UMW

The 11,000 to 12,000 trees shading the streets and parks of Lynchburg, Virginia, are a lot to keep up with. But Sarah Hagan, a 2011 University of Mary Washington graduate, has charge of them all, from roots to crowns. As Lynchburg’s urban forester, Hagan oversees trees individually but also as an interdependent whole – the urban […]

Students Wild for Smithsonian Endangered Species Program

Sophomore Liliana Ramirez (pictured here) and junior Maddie Lichter are the first two students to participate in a partnership between UMW and the Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation.

Sophomore Liliana Ramirez (pictured here) and junior Maddie Lichter are the first two students to participate in a partnership between UMW and the Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation.

Liliana Ramirez and Madelyn “Maddie” Lichter know that residence hall life can be a bit like living in a zoo. So these University of Mary Washington students felt prepared for all the wildlife sounds and smells they’ve experienced over the last several months.

Both pursuing UMW’s new conservation biology major, Ramirez and Lichter are pioneer participants in a new partnership between Mary Washington and the Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation. The pair has spent the last semester engaged in a new kind of “domestic study abroad experience,” conducting hands-on research on endangered animal and plant species at Front Royal’s Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, nestled at the foot of the Blue Ridge Mountains on 3,200 acres of forest, grasslands and pasture along the Shenandoah River.

“We hear wolves howling, and whooping cranes going at it. Last night, I heard something that sounded very zebra-like,” said Ramirez, mimicking the noise she heard while falling asleep in the residence hall. The building is one of three on campus, which also includes a dining common area and an academic center with state-of-the-art classrooms and research labs. Read more.

Lamphere Offers Insight for Viral Turtle Photo

Assistant Biology Professor Brad Lamphere

Assistant Biology Professor Brad Lamphere

Assistant Professor of Biology Brad Lamphere, an expert on the ecology and evolution of freshwater fishes, offered up his insight on turtles to The Free Lance-Star after a photo of three turtles stacked on top of each other in the Rappahannock Canal went viral, garnering millions of views worldwide.

Brad Lamphere, an assistant professor of biology at the University of Mary Washington, said turtles enjoy basking on dry things in water.

“Sometimes the dry thing is another turtle,” he said. “I’ve seen a double-decker before, but not a triple.” Read more.