April 14, 2021

Mathur Co-Leads Workshop on Intersectionality and Inclusion

Professor of English Maya Mathur

Professor of English Maya Mathur

Professor of English Maya Mathur co-led the workshop, “Intersectionality and Inclusion in the Early Modern Classroom,” with Elisa Oh of Howard University. The workshop took place during the annual conference of the Shakespeare Association of America, which was held virtually from 30 March to 4 April 2021. The workshop drew on Kimberlé Crenshaw’s theory of intersectionality to examine how the overlapping axes of our identities and those of our students shape our pedagogy.

Mathur Publishes Entry in the Encyclopedia of Global Shakespeare

Professor of English Maya Mathur

Professor of English Maya Mathur

Professor of English Maya Mathur contributed the encyclopedia entry, “Twelfth Night (Dir. Tim Supple, UK, 2003),” to the Palgrave Encyclopedia of Global Shakespeare, edited by Alexa Alice Joubin and published online by Palgrave Macmillan in 2020. The entry examines the role of immigration in the production history and reception of Tim Supple’s Twelfth Night, a television adaptation of William Shakespeare’s play that was first broadcast in 2003 by the British television channel, ITV.

Mathur Publishes Book Chapter

Professor of English Maya Mathur

Professor of English Maya Mathur

Maya Mathur, Professor of English in the Department of English and Linguistics, published a book chapter entitled “Identities” in the volume, A Cultural History of Comedy in the Early Modern Age. The volume was published by Bloomsbury Academic. The chapter examines the literary origins of early modern comic characters and considers how their portrayal is informed by the sexual, economic, and religious mores of their time.

Mathur Presents Research on Shakespeare and Indian Cinema at Queen’s University, Belfast

Maya Mathur, Professor of English

Maya Mathur, Professor of English

Maya Mathur, professor of English, presented the paper, “Desiring Violas in Tim Supple’s Twelfth Night and Atul Kumar’s Piya Behrupiya,” at the conference, Women and Indian Shakespeares: Exploring Cinema, Translation, Performance. The conference was held at Queen’s University, Belfast, from 29 October – 1 November, 2019, and is the first gathering of international scholars to focus exclusively on representations of Shakespeare by Indian writers, translators, and directors from the nineteenth century to the present.

Mathur Presents on Shakespeare at MLA Conference

Maya Mathur, Associate Professor of English

Maya Mathur, Associate Professor of English

Maya Mathur, Associate Professor of English, presented the paper “Twelfth Night in Tragic and Comic Registers” for a panel on “Shakespeare and South Asian Cinema” at the 50th Annual Northeastern Modern Language Association Conference in Washington, DC. Her paper examined two cinematic adaptations of William Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night (1601), Tim Supple’s Twelfth Night (2003) and Atul Kumar’s Piya Behrupiya (2012), that are set partially or wholly on the Indian subcontinent. In the paper, she considers the changes that both directors make to Shakespeare’s play in order to address local contexts and concerns.

 

Mathur Contributes Essay to Shakespeare Collection

Maya Mathur, Associate Professor of English and Associate Chair of the Department of English, Linguistics, and Communication, recently had her essay “‘I Know Thee Not, Old Man’: Using Film and Television to Teach 1 and 2 Henry IV” published in the Modern Language Association Series Approaches to Teaching Shakespeare’s English History Plays, edited by Laurie Ellinghausen.

UMW Hosts Eighteenth-Century Conference

The 47th Annual Conference of the East-Central American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies met at UMW on Oct. 27-29. Marie McAllister (ELC) served as 2016 Conference Chair. Program Committee members were Ben LaBreche (ELC), Betsy Lewis (MLL), Will Mackintosh (HIST), and Maya Mathur (ELC). Marie Wellington (MLL) and Richard Hansen (emeritus, ELC) served as registration volunteers. The nearly one hundred attendees hailed from institutions in Virginia and neighboring states, and from schools across the country. Events included a keynote address by Catherine Ingrassia of VCU and walking tours of Historic Fredericksburg. LaBreche and Mackintosh also presented their scholarly work at the conference, and Wellington served on the Molin Prize Committee.

The conference was supported by the Wendy Shadwell ’63 Program Endowment in British Literature, the CAS Dean’s Office, and the ELC, HISP, HIST, and MLL Departments. Special thanks to our student aides and to the many wonderful staff members from Events, Setup, Catering, Copy Center, Admissions, University Center, Parking, CAS, ELC, HISP, HIST, and MLL who contributed their knowledge and assistance.

 

Mathur Presents at Shakespeare Conference

Maya Mathur, associate professor of English and Associate Chair of the Department of English, Linguistics and Communication, presented the paper “Family Dynamics in Vishal Bhardwaj’s Omkara” at the conference “Shakespeare and Our Times,” which was held at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Va., on April 14-16. Her paper examined representations of gender in Omkara, an Indian adaptation of Shakespeare’s Othello.

Mathur Presents on Shakespeare and Riot

Maya Mathur, associate professor and associate chair of the Department of English, Linguistics, and Communication, presented the paper “Riotous Genres” at the annual conference of the Shakespeare Association of America, which was held in New Orleans from March 24-26, 2016. Her paper was part of a seminar on “Shakespeare and Riot.”

Mathur Publishes Article on Late-Sixteenth-Century Play

Maya Mathur, associate professor of English, recently published an article entitled “Rebellion from Below: Commonwealth and Community in The Life and Death of Jack Straw.” The article appeared in Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 45.2 (May 2015): 343-365.