November 29, 2022

‘Panic-gogy’: Teaching Online Classes During The Coronavirus Pandemic (OPB.org; NPR)

Broome’s Online Learning Collective Mentioned on NPR

College of Education Associate Professor John Broome. Photo by Norm Shafer.

College of Education Associate Professor John Broome. Photo by Norm Shafer.

College of Education Professor John Broome’s Online Learning Collective, a Facebook group launched last week that now boasts over 16,000 members, was mentioned in an NPR story about the challenge of transitioning in-person courses to online. The article also features former UMW Digital Studies instructor Sean Michael Morris.

“Everyone’s freaked out,” says Sean Michael Morris. He’s in the School of Education and Human Development at the University of Colorado, Denver and the director of Digital Pedagogy Lab, an organization focused on digital learning, technology and social justice. He’s one of the curators of Teaching Online With Care, a crowdsourced document collecting ideas about this transition. There’s also a Facebook group with 15,000 members started by John Broome at the University of Mary Washington, called “Online Learning Collective.” Read more.

Professor Wins Grant to Pen Open Education Textbook

It’s a dilemma faced by many students on financial aid. Funds often don’t hit accounts until a few weeks into the semester, so students can’t purchase textbooks, and they risk falling behind. Melissa Wells, an assistant professor in UMW’s College of Education (COE), knows this scenario all too well. That’s why she’s designing an Open […]

John Broome: Courageous Conversations

College of Education Associate Professor John Broome keeps his worst student course evaluation from his first year at UMW displayed in his office, right beside his teaching award. For him, it’s a constant reminder that he should always strive for improvement as an educator.

College of Education Associate Professor John Broome. Photo by Norm Shafer.

College of Education Associate Professor John Broome. Photo by Norm Shafer.

Broome believes that American educators need to focus their attention on being better teachers to children from all backgrounds. In the classroom, he and his students engage in discussions about race and racism, equity, privilege, implicit bias, youth trauma and poverty to understand the complex web of issues affecting schoolchildren across Virginia and the United States.

“When you have students impacted by these factors, then teaching, learning and classroom environments look different. You have to meet your students where they are with positive expectations for their ability and growth,” said Broome, who has a Ph.D. in education from the University of Virginia, an M.Ed. in curriculum and instruction from George Mason University and a B.A. in government from The College of William and Mary.

That’s why Broome, whose research focuses on social justice, critical race theory and civic education, was eager to participate in Courageous Conversations, a new video series featuring UMW faculty discussing diversity and inclusion. But he wants his students to think of these topics not as courageous but normalized and present in every classroom.

“We need to work toward having a more open, honest dialogue about the lived and historical experiences of all peoples in our country,” said Broome, who has taught secondary social studies in public and private schools across Virginia. “When more than half of students in our country are Black, Indigenous and People of Color, all students should not just learn more about these histories, but from their own voices as well.”

 

 

Q: Are there are any projects you enjoy having your students do?
A: My students enjoy the culture quilt project, in which they divide a poster board into 16 squares like a quilt. They use pictures, words and phrases to explore their family histories, their professional and personal cultural selves and other cultures that are unfamiliar to them. It’s an opportunity for students to self-interrogate, understand who they are and become more accepting of others.

Q: How did you come to direct the Hungry Brains! program at Hazel Hill?
A: I’ve been involved since 2012. It’s an after-school program for economically disadvantaged K-8 students in downtown Fredericksburg that is entirely UMW student-run. It empowers student leadership responsibilities while addressing the academic needs of children in this community. We’ve also helped with fundraising. On Valentine’s Day 2018, my students and I sold candy-grams on UMW’s campus so that Hazel Hill students could open their first savings accounts as part of a financial literacy project. I’ve raised money to help build their library and purchase new technology for the Center.

Associate Professor of Education John Broome with his class. Photo by Norm Shafer.

Associate Professor of Education John Broome with his class. Photo by Norm Shafer.

Q: You encourage your students to use culturally responsive teaching practices. How does that improve learning in the classroom?
A: This centers culture in all aspects of learning. It includes having high expectations of all students; being more student-centered; becoming more culturally competent; building the relationships between schools, families and community; learning the contexts of diversity and cultures; and reframing the curriculum. My work is mostly on the curriculum and what it means when students don’t see their multiple identities reflected in what they are learning.

Q: What is one piece of advice you give to aspiring educators to make their classrooms more inclusive?
A: How you teach is often more important than what you teach. You never know what is going on in the life of a child.

Q: Who or what inspires you?
A: My wife inspires me. She was a first-in-family college graduate from a small town in Oregon. Multiple degrees later, she is a dean at another university. She’s absolutely brilliant.

Q: What would you be doing if you were not a professor?
A: I would be an international travel and food writer, a chef or an electronic dance music DJ. In addition to going to EDM shows regularly in D.C. around the United States, my wife and I are traveling to festivals in Holland, Finland and Belgium this year.

Q: What would people be most surprised to learn about you?
A: In college, I had a pet duck named Clyde, who snored when he slept on you. It was adorable.

Q: Are there any mottos that you live by?
A: “I love America more than any other country in this world, and, exactly for this reason, I insist on the right to criticize her perpetually.” ~James Baldwin

Q: What books are you reading right now or have you read recently that inspired you?
A: “We Want to Do More Than Survive: Abolitionist Teaching and the Pursuit of Educational Freedom” by Bettina L. Love, an associate professor at the University of Georgia.

 

John Broome Presents at National Education Conference

John P. Broome, associate professor in the College of Education, co-presented, “White-ish: An Investigation of the Educational Resources of the National Women’s History Museum,” with Dr. Lauren Colley (University of Alabama) at the College and University Faculty Assembly of the National Council for the Social Studies 2018 National Conference in Chicago, IL. This work explores the teaching materials provided by the national museum and coded for the representation of diverse women through the tenets of Critical Race Theory, White Social Studies, and Intersectional Feminism. Findings included  patterns of inherent whitenss in their materials; consistent with research on marginalized women in curriculum and textbook studies. Using Gay’s (2018) culturally responsive teaching, and the “symbolic curriculum”, we provide insights and examples for the inclusion voices of diverse women through primary sources in K-12 classrooms.

Dr. Broome also served as “Discussant” for the session entitled, “Social Studies Education and Race, Part II: Critical Conversations in Teacher Education”. His talk, “Considering Trauma: Race/ism, Critical Theory, and Social Studies Teacher Education”, synthesized the four papers presented, and provided considerations into how teacher educators: 1) develop and execute critical race-based activities, 2) prepare future teachers to discuss race beyond colleges of education, and, 3) consider the limitations of theory and publications when capturing the process.

Dr. Broome’s research interests focus on the intersection of social studies and race/ism, equity, and whiteness. He earned his B.A. in Government from The College of William & Mary, a M.Ed. in Curriculum & Instruction (Secondary Social Studies) from George Mason University, and a Ph.D. in Education (Social Studies Education) from the Curry School of Education and Human Development at the University of Virginia. Before joining UMW, Dr. Broome taught secondary social studies in public and private schools in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

Broome Contributes to Award-Winning Book

John P. Broome, associate professor of education in the College of Education, co-authored “Before You Click ‘Share’: Mindful Media Literacy as a Positive Civic Act” in the recently published book, “Critical Media Literacy and Fake News in Post-Truth America“, published by Brill. This book recently won the “2019 Divergent Award for Excellence in 21st Century Literacies Research” by the Initiative for 21st Century Literacies Research.

His chapter, written with Dr. Jason Endacott (University of Arkansas), Matthew Dingler (University of Arkansas), and Seth French (University of Arkansas), provides classroom strategies for developing media literacy skills that emphasize substantiation and critical reflection on bias. These skills are then situated within the context of information sharing as a civic act, prompting students to consider the potential democratic consequences for clicking the “share” button.

Dr. Broome’s research interests focus on the intersection of civic learning and social justice in schools with a focus on race, equity, and privilege. He earned his B.A. in Government from The College of William & Mary, a M.Ed. in Curriculum & Instruction (Secondary Social Studies) from George Mason University, and a Ph.D. in Education (Social Studies Education) from the Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia. Before joining UMW, Dr. Broome taught secondary social studies in public and private schools in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

Davis, Clayton and Broome Publish Article

Janine Davis, Courtney Clayton and John Broome’s article titled “Thinking like researchers: Action research and its impact on novice teachers’ thinking” was recently published in Educational Action Research. Full article can be found at http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/dxsxQffQmWmfXxZhFXti/full

Teaching Civics in an Age of Trump (The Christian Science Monitor)

John Broome Co-Authors Op-Ed on Virginia Social Studies

John Broome, associate professor in the UMW College of Education, was among 17 Virginia professors  who contributed to Testing Times: Teaching history, social science creates informed citizenry an op-ed featured in the Richmond Times-Dispatch.

COE Faculty Present at AERA Conference

Janine Davis, Courtney Clayton, and John Broome, all assistant professors in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, presented their research at the annual conference of the American Educational Research Association on “The Power of Educational Research for Innovation in Practice and Policy” in Philadelphia on April 6, 2014.  Their study investigates the ways that action research impacts professional identity among preservice teachers.

AERA is concerned with improving the educational process by encouraging scholarly inquiry related to education and evaluation and by promoting the dissemination and practical application of research results. AERA is the most prominent international professional organization for educational researchers, with the primary goal of advancing educational research and its practical application. Its more than 25,000 members are educators; administrators; directors of research; persons working with testing or evaluation in federal, state and local agencies; counselors; evaluators; graduate students; and behavioral scientists.